Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

& her barefoot heart

Page 2 of 105

Week 48 (1/9-15/2017) Recap

Block 7000 made by Diane Dresdner, 3.5″x 6.5″ = 9 cm x 16.5 cm

Week 48 was a full week that found many people making blocks while I was out of town moving our daughter. I did, however, still manage to get a few things done for and with The 70273 Project . . .

I made a presentation to my cousin’s Methodist Women’s group in Thomaston, Georgia, and I received invitations to do several other presentations in the near future. I’ll tell you more later.

I created two versions of a one-sheet handout for use at exhibits, programs, etc. that explains a little more about The 70273 Project.

I amended information on making quilts information, and updated links, and developed a new block tagging system that goes yet a little bit faster.

Wings of The 70273 (a small piece I made especially for the SAQA Trunk Show made from parts of a toddler boy’s shirt and a toddler girl’s party dress)) was received and sent on tour for three years.

For the first time, The Engineer came out of the post office with the mail in one of those big ole’ sturdy this-is-gonna’-take-two-hands-and-you-better-return-this-to-the-post-office-or-else boxes! Filling the box were blocks from:

Rosalie Roberts (ID/USA)
Kath O’Donnell (Camperdown AUS)
Hannah Holloway and her mom, Laura Wolverton: (IN/USA)
Isabella Holloway and her mom, Laura Wolverton: (IN/USA)
Laura Wolverton: (IN/USA)
Pat LaPierre (ME/USA)
Elender Ballard Akin (GA/USA)
Sharleen Jesperson (FL/USA)
Katie Smith (GA/USA))
Anonymous (GA/USA)
Frances Watson (GA/USA))
Emily Davison (GA/USA)
Gene Johnson (GA/USA)
Anonymous (GA/USA)
Becky Watts (GA/USA)
Glenda Stevens (GA/USA)
Anonymous (GA/USA)
Anonymous (GA/USA)
Anonymous (GA/USA)
Diane Dresdner (VA/USA)
Linda Smith (AZ/USA)
Linda Smith & Tari Vickery (AZ and CA/USA)

bringing out total block count to . . . 7084! Congratulations, y’all. One tenth of the people we commemorate have been, well, commemorated.

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Check back in a couple of hours for the next updated block count update on this, our first anniversary.
And if you lose your way, here are links to today’s other posts:
And here are the other posts on  today’s catch-up marathon:
Week 49
Week 50
Here’s a short link to use when sharing this post: http://wp.me/pwW64-2Bt

Happy One Year Anniversary

Enjoy a digital cupcake while you read.

One year ago today, I launched The 70273 Project, and thanks to you, it’s been a wonderful, glorious, magnificent year, and I have a few ideas of how we can celebrate . . .

~ Make a block or start a Middling today and post photos on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and on your blog (using #the70273project and tagging me so I don’t miss it), and when you’re ready to send it to me, be sure to note “One Year Special Edition” on the Provenance Form because special quilts will be made and special exhibits will be staged.

~ Make a donation to help cover shipping materials shipping and postage costs, office supplies, and a host of other necessities by mashing the “donate” button in the sidebar or by writing a check made payable to The 70273 Project, Inc and mailing it to me at POB 994 / Cashiers, NC / 28717.

~ Make it known. Tell people about The 70273 Project. Share posts on Facebook. Post photos in social media. Participate in The 70273 Project Monthly Mixers. Invite people to join the English-speaking Facebook Campfire group. or The French-speaking Facebook group. In fact, what say we get 70,273 people to like The 70273 Project Facebook page and 70,273 photos on Instagram using #the70273project?

Today I’ll be posting here on the blog throughout the day, each post bearing highlights of the past 5 weeks, each a stepping leading us up to the official current block count. (Hint: buckle up!)

If you’re already part of The 70273 Project tribe, thank you.
If you’re not, join us today and help commemorate 70,273 special people.

I’ll see you in about 3 hours with the first update.

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Copy and paste the short link to share this post: http://bit.ly/2lFeEjx
And here are the other posts on  today’s catch-up marathon:
Week 48
Week 49
Week 50

Story Time: Block #3771

Block #3771 Made by Margaret Williams

These X’s are made from the seams of a sweatshirt worn by my best friend’s father. He died a few years ago, and I was making a quilt for her mama from his clothing. Mr. Evans was a huge World War II history buff, and he would’ve loved this project.

Do your blocks have a story? Please share.

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A Letter from Christine Fitzgerald: Learning from Children

Coxhoe Quilters’ stall for The 70273 Project at Durham Cathedral. Photo by Chrissy Fitzgerald

Dear Jeanne,

As you know, Coxhoe quilt group worked with schoolchildren on Friday 27th January, Holocaust Memorial day, as part of a series of workshops. Three sessions later in the morning and we had a huge pile of blocks made. I must admit I was a little apprehensive about how it would go, and wondered if it was too big an ask to invite the pupils to sew blocks, rather than simply draw with fabric pens, which would have been quicker and easier.

Photo by Chrissy Fitzgerald

How wrong I was. The pupils listened to the excellent talk given by the museum’s fantastic, helpful education team and then when invited to start sewing, simply picked up the materials without hesitation and got stuck in willingly. Seeing the look of concentration on their faces – it was obvious that most of them were unfamiliar with basic techniques – brought a huge lump to my throat,and as another member of our quilt group mentioned, “goosebumps”. The stitches were huge, knots and the technique of threading needles were struggled with, and those who stitched with the squares in their laps were in imminent danger of stitching their clothing along with the blocks.

The material puckered, and I mentioned afterwards to the group that we could “straighten it out”. No, the answer came – leave it as it is: it is their work and we can work the feature into the quilting and piecing afterwards. How right they were; short of securing anything about to fall off, the quality of the work has a beauty to it beyond the finest workmanship.

It was a lesson to me in a number of ways: setting out to help teach on the day, I ended up learning more than I taught from these children. The way they willingly assisted, even though it was clearly out of their comfort zone: the persistance and diligence as they sended the scale and importance of what they were doing: and the value of standing back – except when asked to assist – and allowing the pupils to explore and create without “jumping in” the whole time and correcting. The unique visual impact that was the result of their creations, and is waiting to come together as quilts, is something the group is very excited and honoured to participate in.

The effort put in by everyone on the day to make this a success was overwhelming, and I feel honoured to be working with so many good, lovely, generous people.

As I contemplated the day’s victory over my control freak tendancies, I had a random memory from childhood: running up to my (Irish) mother and auntie, with two knitting needles stuck into what I now realise was just a huge tangle of wool. “LOOK!” I bellowed, “I’m KNITTING!”. My mother and auntie paused in their gossiping session and calmly regarded my, um, attempts. Auntie Pauline switched on her trademark full-beam twinkly smile and delivered her verdict.

Good girl yerself, she said.

I hope to make blocks with many other people this year, and will be taking a hint from that memory; the blocks will be their own creations, and I will help, but will be embracing the full spectrum of the beauty of creative work from all, and simply enjoying the moment.

With very best wishes from the UK,

 Chrissy

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Dear Chrissy,

The best teachers learn from their students. Thank you for sharing this day with us and for all you and the other Coxhoe Quilters are doing there. May we all be willing to let our child self come out to play more often.

Thank you,

Jeanne

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Children of all ages are cordially invited to help commemorate these 70,273 souls by  making blocks and participating in The 70273 Project.

A New Way To Make Blocks and Quilts: Middlings

Remember how I’ve always said that I want quilts of all sizes so we can fit into any venue that will have us? Remember how I’ve always said I want our displays to be a feast for the senses?
Remember how I’ve always said I want viewers to feel the full impact when viewing The 70273 Project quilts?

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project made by Margaret Williams

Well now, thanks to an idea seed planted by Lynn Krawczyk, I’m opening up a new way to make not just blocks, but quilts for The 70273 Project. It’s a whole new category of quilts called Middlings, and I asked a few elves to stitch up some to give you some ideas.

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project Made by Margaret Williams (GA/USA)

Most guidelines remain in place: background is white, pairs of red X’s, no writing or other embellishments to distract from the red X’s, but then . . . Middlings are quilts that measure 18″ x 22″ (46 cm x 56 cm) (yes, fat quarter size) when finished, and, as long as you remember the basics, you are free to get as creative as you want.

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project made by Margaret Williams (GA/USA)

And are you ready for this? You can also commemorate many more people because as long as the red X’s are presented as easily recognizable pairs, you can commemorate as many people as desired in one Middling quilt. In the quilt above, there are 119 pairs of red X’s which means that Margaret made 119 blocks which means that she commemorated 119 people. Yes, that’s right: each pair of red X’s counts as one block. I’m not kidding.

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project Made by Margaret Williams (GA/USA)

Guidelines for Middlings:
~ Background fabric must be white (representing the medical records, the only information assessing physicians used to make their life and death decisions).
~ Red X’s MUST be presented as easily recognizable pairs because each pair of red X’s represents one person.
~ Get as creative as you like and put as many red X’s as desired on the Middling, just remember to place the red X’s so that they are easily identifiable as pairs.
~ An amended Provenance Form includes a space for you to tell me how many pairs of red X’s are on your Middling. We’re gonna’ operate on the honor system, and I’m sure you can figure out why.
~ Finished size of Middlings is about 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm).
~ Bindings or facings (finished edges) must be white.
~ Backing fabric must be white (quilting cotton or bleached muslin is okay).
~ Middlings must come to me completely finished and ready to hang.
~ Middlings need a hanging sleeve attached to the top of the back.
~ There must be an official 70273 project label on the back of the quilt. When you’ve completed your Middling, contact me, and I’ll create the label for you and send it digitally. You’ll simply print and stitch.  I’ll be writing a post about that in the next few days, so check back for more details.

Important note: We are still making blocks and piecing them together to make Big Quilts. This does not replace blocks, it simply provides another option for those who are interested.

A few more Middlings in progress to send you looking for your sketch book:

A Middling for The 70273 Project Being Made by Maria Conway (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

A Middling in the making by Gisele Therezien (Channel Islands, UK)

Gisele writes: Prepping my Middlings background from a vintage doily & the edge of an old embroidered sheet donated by Mum which originally was part of her wedding trousseau 59 years ago, also have some vintage red lace which may fit in nicely. So we see that when it comes to stories and layers of meaning, size doesn’t matter.

Over the next several months, I’ll be revealing at least 3 more ways to make quilts for The 70273 Project over the next several months, so be sure you subscribe so you don’t miss out.

Your homework:
Check back for the shiny new Provenance Form.
Tell others about The 70273 Project.
Subscribe.
Start sketching!

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UPDATE 2/2/2017:

Good clarification questions, asked and answered:

Q: Is it ok to have cream color in the background?
A: Yes, provided there’s mostly white. Think of the creme/off white as an accent.

Q: Is it ok to have a textured background in cream or white i see that too?
A: Yes.

Q: i see that the middlings are finished with top quilting also
which requires batting. Can we do that too and what thickness of batting?
A: Yes, use batting. Doesn’t matter what kind, though most folks are using the 80/20 mix. You can find a little more about that on the Information for Piecers and Quilters page.

Q: Also what is the seam allowance for the larger size?
A: Just so long as the finished size is about 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm),  the seam allowance is up to you.

Q: Also i see a heart design out of the x’s which i love. So am i free to make any shape as long as it signifies pairs of x’s On white Or cream?
A: Yes! Isn’t that fun? You can use pairs of red X’s to make shapes, just remember that the red X’s must be stitched in pairs, so be sure to leave space between each pair like Margaret did.

Q: Can the red x’s just be on whole cloth or do they still need to be pieced?
A: The background of Middlings can be whole cloth or pieced, your preference, it just has to be about 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm) when finished.

Q: How will you catalog these?
A: Each pair of red X’s = one block (so be sure to tell me on the Provenance Form how many pairs are on your Middling) and my database is set up so that one block = one entry. That is, I must enter each block (or in this case paris of red X’s) separately. Here’s how the Middling process will go:

1. You make a middling
2. When finished, you email me and let me know.
3. I assign a quilt number, design the label and email it back to you.
4. You print and attach the label.
5. You send the Middling to me, with a Provenance Form (even if you’ve already completed one) telling me how many “blocks” (or pairs of red X’s) are on the Middling.
6. I enter each pair as a block (to update the block count and keep my records straight), giving you credit for each one. So you get credit for those “blocks” and for the Middling quilt itself.
Q: Do I need to complete a Provenance Form for each Middling, even if you already have a Provenance Form on file for me because I’ve sent you blocks?
A: Yes. I need a Provenance Form completed, signed, and sent with each Middling. If you send me 3 Middlings, I’ll need a Provenance Form pinned (safety pins, please) to each Middling because I’ve added the space for you to tell me how many blocks, or in this case, pairs of red X’s, are in each Middling. It will help me so much if I don’t have to count every pair of red X’s, so thank you for taking the time to do this.

February’s Monthly Mixer

 

Here are your prompts for February, and we have the creative one known as Pam Yates to thank for most of them! Feel free to share throughout social media land and post on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, and your blogs using #The70273ProjectMonthlyMixer and #The70273Project. It’d be muchly appreciated if you’d tag me, too, so I don’t miss it. I’m @whollyjeanne on twitter and instagram, and Jeanne Hewell-Chambers on facebook. It’s a fun way to acquaint others with The 70273 Project, and to get acquainted with other folks ourselves. I can’t wait to see the world through your eyes.

Here’s the text in case the graphic is unreadable:

February 2017 Monthly Mixer
1. Your red thread stash
2. A piece of red fabric you adore
3. Your favorite piece of red clothing
4. A handmade item you love
5. A pair of shoes that make you feel confident
6. A blast from the past
7. Something that sparkles
8. A red button
9. Something that makes you glad to be alive
10.Your favorite piece of jewelry
11.A face you love
12.Something red with a white embellishment(s)
13.An old Valentine
14.Love
15.A new Valentine
16.Something that’s red and edible
17.Something white with red embellishment(s)
18.A photo of a childhood friend
19.Something that makes your heart turn somersaults
20.What you look like when with somebody you love
21.A heart
22.Lace
23.A love letter
24.A sewing tool you cherish
25.A pair of red earrings
26.Something red in nature
27.A selfie of your lips
28.Red or pink flowers . .

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AND here it is in French, thanks to Nancy Carroll and Cecile . . .

70273 Interaction Mensuelle Fevrier 2017
1. Votre cachette de fil rouge
2. Un morceau de tissu que vous adorez
3. Votre pièce d’habillement rouge préféré
4. Quelque chose fait à main que vous adorez
5. Une paire de chaussures qui vous font vous sentir confiante
6. Quelque chose qui évoque le passé
7.  Quelque chose qui étincelle
8.  Un bouton rouge
9.  Quelque chose qui vous rend heureuse d’être vivante
10. Votre bijou préféré
11. Un visage que vous adorez
12. Quelque chose de blanc avec embellit par du rouge
13. Une Valentine ancienne
14. L’amour
15. Une Valentine nouvelle
16. Quelque chose rouge et mangeable
17. Quelque chose de rouge embellit de blanc
18. Une photo d’une amie d’enfance
19. Quelque chose qui fait chavirer votre coeur
20. Votre visage lorsque vous êtes avec quelqu’un que vous adorez
21. Un coeur
22. La dentelle
23. Une lettre d’amour
24. Un outil de couture que vous aimez bien
25. Une paire de boucles d’oreilles rouges
26. Quelque chose de rouge au naturel
27. Un selfie de vos lèvres
28. Des fleures rouges ou roses

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Other places to gather around The 70273 Project water cooler:
Shop with Amazon Smile and support The 70273 Project.
Subscribe to the blog (where all information is shared).
Join the English-speaking Facebook group – our e-campfire – where you can talk to other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.
Join the French-speaking Facebook group – our other e-campfire – where you can chat with other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.
Like the Facebook page where you can check in for frequent updates.
Get folks to help celebrate your birthday by making blocks and/or donating bucks.
Follow the pinterest board for visual information.
Post using #the70273project on Instagram. (Please tag me, too, @whollyjeanne, so I don’t miss anything.)
Tell your friends what you want for your birthday.
And if you haven’t yet made some blocks, perhaps you’d like to put some cloth in your hands and join us.
Or maybe you’d like to gather friends and family, colleagues or students, club or guild members, etc. together and make a group quilt.

May I Have The Envelope, Please

High School Sports Awards and  Letters: We’ll never know whether she would’ve lettered or not because her parents refused to let her play basketball because she would’ve had to wear shorts.

High School Clubs and After School Activities: “We didn’t have clubs back then,” she tells me when I asked what she did in high school, “but I was the first editor of The Hi Times, our high school newspaper, and the man who was Editor of the Atlanta Journal and Constitution was my advertising manager.”

Post High School Education: She didn’t go to college ’cause having only enough money to send one child to college, it was my mother’s little brother who has the college degree.

Jobs: Though her best friend, Harriett Dean, tried and tried and tried, my mother steadfastly refused to take a higher paying job in Atlanta, choosing instead to spend her career in her hometown of Fayetteville, Georgia. As secretary for the Baptist Church, Mother held all the power as it was she who selected the hymns we sang every Sunday.

When the county got big enough to hire a second person, my mother left the employ of the Baptist Church to become Clerk of the County Commissioners. She cleared out a little space for herself in the courthouse, and using the file cabinet that somebody gave her and the desk she brought from home, she set about helping Mr. Jimmy White (the county Ordinary) separate the files, dividing them into 2 piles: County Ordinary and County Commissioners. “It was a nasty job,” Mother told me, “some of those files were covered in tobacco juice.” After a few years, Mama Opal Howell lured Mother to work beside her at the Fayette County Board of Education where, with the exception of the few years she took off to build the business infrastructure while Daddy build the golf course, she worked till her retirement.

Service to the Community: Trustees from the jail – prisoners who’d proven themselves trustworthy enough to go out into the town and empty trashcans at the Fayette County Board of Education – were regularly “adopted” by my mother and the other women who worked at the Fayette County Board of Education, Mama Helen Voyles and Mama Opal Howell. After counseling the men on how to stay out of trouble, the women sent the Trustees out into the world in a new suit, fearing that prison stripes would be detrimental to their success. And though they’d sometimes look out the office window to see a Trustee being returned to his jail cell, these women never gave up hope that the next Trustee they took under their wings would be rehabilitated for good.

These days, if you fall ill, my mother will see that your family is fed in your absence, and if you’re in the hospital, not only will she drive your spouse to be by your side and back home again every day, she’ll see that your family is well-fed until your release from the hospital or till you’re back on your feet in the kitchen, whichever comes first.

As an Ambassador for The 70273 Project, Mother works tirelessly making blocks and delivering materials to others so they can make blocks.

Every year for the past I don’t know how many decades, mother plans, organizes, and hosts the Class of 1945 high school class reunion. They come together for a luncheon at Mother’s house, and though attendance was down to 6 last year, Mother is already looking forward to this year’s reunion.

I am button-busting proud that my mother devoted much of her working life to making the school system she is proud to call her alma mater a better place for all of us to learn, and that she spent all of her adult life working to make Fayette County the best place on earth to call Home.

~~~

These are some of the things I told the Fayette County High School Distinguished Alumni tonight when I nominated my mother, and it is with great pleasure that I tell you that in October, mother will be inducted into the Fayette County High School Hall of Fame.

International Holocaust Remembrance Day

 

Today and every day,
we remember.

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Join us?

If


If the Hong Kong flu hadn’t taken hold in the US,
If I hadn’t already spent my week in sick bay, wrestling the virus into the ground,
If they hadn’t closed the college because there was no more room to quarantine,
If I hadn’t been bored enough to go to the high school basketball game,
if my high school friend hadn’t been bored enough to go to the basketball game,
If we hadn’t gotten bored at the basketball game and decided to take our leave and head to  Underground Atlanta,
If a would-be boyfriend hadn’t passed out gone to sleep early and rendering him unable to follow through on his promise to call my daddy if I wasn’t back by midnight,
If we’d had enough money between us for one drink and two straws,
If she hadn’t remembered this guy she met the weekend before who was wearing a brown, floppy-brimmed leather hat and worked in Muhlenbrink’s Saloon,
If I hadn’t been thirsty enough to shove aside my intense crowd anxiety and join her to push our way to the bar through the throngs of drunk people listening to Rosebud,
If the guy drawing beers hadn’t borrowed the brown, floppy-brimmed leather hat from the guy mixing drinks at the other end of the bar,
If she hadn’t argued with the cute-as-all-get-out beer-drawing guy when he said he’d never seen her before in his life,
If she had listened to me and we had left right then,
If he hadn’t asked us to go to a party at the bouncer’s apartment when the bar closed,
If she hadn’t said “Yes” so quickly and enthusiastically,
If we hadn’t taken her car, leaving me no choice but to go along,
If the Sweet Spirit of Surprise hadn’t put the roommate in the car with her and me in the car with the beer guy,
If he hadn’t been so cute and charming and caused all kinds of climate conditions to change with the kaleidoscope of butterfly wings he set to flapping wildly when he kissed me . . .
I never would’ve met the guy who has never – not even once – had to call on his engineer training to turn my life’s lights on.

44 year ago today, my life changed forever when I met and instantly fell head-over-heels in deep, unwavering love with The Engineer.  Look at my long list called The Best Day Ever, and you’ll find January 27, 1973 at the very top.

A Reminder

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Remember.

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