Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

& her barefoot heart

Blocks Being Made Around the World

More block drives, y’all . . .

Susan Luff sends photos from today’s Block Drive and Workshop for The 70273 Project organised by Edina Geering and held in Culverstone Community Centre in Meopham. “An amazing amount of love has gone into making all these blocks – it was a pleasure to be able to help,” writes Susan. “It was also quite chilling and surreal as I was sewing today to imagine that I was sewing someone’s life.”

 

 

 

L to R: Susan and Edina

Our Edina fell and dislocated her toe, leaving her foot a colorful array of bruises. She will be at The Great British Sewing Bee tomorrow as scheduled, but she needs help, so if you’re going, please consider volunteering your time for at least a little while.

The amazing, dynamic Lucy Horner sends these photos from The Great British Sewing Bee today where more blocks were made and pledged:

 

 

Three Generations of Women Stitching Blocks for The 70273 Project

And over in Franklinton, Louisiana, Mary Teresa Green held a workshop for the Queen Bees Guild and sends these photos and words:

“Today I hosted a 70273 Block Making Party at one of my quilt guilds, The Queen Bees of Franklinton, LA,” Mary writes. “The members had a great time and took a lot of white squares and red fabric to make blocks. In Franklinton, Louisiana. One member who wasn’t able to make it to the meeting even texted me photos of two blocks she made ahead of time.  Everyone was very moved and motivated. The members will continue to make blocks and bring hand them in to me to send to you.  The Queen Bees  have two steadfast rules: leave your bad attitude at the door and you don’t have to do anything you don’t want to. Those rules make for a laid back group that is amazingly productive.”

 

 

 

 

 

So many people being commemorated with reverence and beauty. Please keep making blocks, Middlings, Long Skinnies, and block quilts, encouraging your friends and family to join in, and send me photos and stories. I’ve got some important news coming out over the next few days, so be sure you either subscribe to the blog or check back here frequently so you’re always in the know.

SaveSave

Making Blocks at The Great British Sewing Bee

The Great British Sewing Bee opened today, and thanks to the efforts of 70273 Project Ambassador Lucy Horner (who took and sent every one of these photos),  Edina Geering (you met her and her adorable and precocious granddaughter on Hever Castle weekend), and I don’t know who all else, The 70273 Project has a beautiful booth and plenty of block making supplies ready for the making. And oh the making that did happen today . . .

Patrick  Grant
– Great British Sewing Bee judge and menswear fashion designer –
stopped by today and promises to be back tomorrow to make a block.

Thank you for the shout-out Natasha McCarty
of Channel 78, The Sewing Quarter,
and for going back tomorrow to make a block.

So if you live in the vicinity (or even if you don’t),
get yourself over to The Great British Sewing Bee
sometime before it closes on 9/24/2017
to enjoy the sights;
meet Edina, Lucy, Berol, and Debs;
and make a block or three to commemorate
these special people we honor.

Who knows? You might even get to drive through
a rainbow on the way home,
as did Lucy, Edina, Berol, and Debs today.

~~~~~~~

There’s a lot coming up in The 70273 Project,
and here’s how to make sure you don’t miss a thing:
subscribe to the blog
join the English Facebook group
join the French Facebook group
like the Facebook page
follow along on Instagram
have a look at the Pinterest board

About Those Two Red X’s

Block #1, made by Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

They’re such a little thing,
a simple design, folks say,
and yet they’re incredibly hard to make.

When I sat to stitch the first block,
I had no trouble cutting out the base
or threading the needle.
I had no trouble cleaning toilets
or cleaning out the dishwasher
or going to the grocery store.
But I had much trouble
stitching two red X’s.
The fact that they represented
a life
did not escape my heart,
my brain,
or my hands.
Continue reading

Highlights and Recap: August 14, 2017 to September 17, 2017

Here are highlights of the weeks that were:

Week 79, August 14-20, 2017
Two people mentioned corporate matching programs and began investigating. Do you know of a corporation that offers grants or have matching funds programs? Let me know because there are expenses . . . especially shipping.

Week 80, August 21-27, 2017
Uta Lenk, The 70273 Project Ambassador from Germany and her son, Jan came to spend a few days with us. There was basketball, fast food, Sliding Rock, boat rides, antique stores, and, of course, stitching blocks. We had so much fun and can’t wait for them to come back.

I shipped three big boxes of quilts to Houston for our Special Exhibit at the International Quilt Festival. They arrived on the same day as Harvey. Yeah, really. More about that in a blog post coming to you soon.

Daughter Alison had emergency surgery.

Week 81, August 28-September 3, 2017
A week filled with mother-as-nurse duties with 70273 duties and responsibilities and infrastructure projects in between. I delivered another suitcase filled with quilts to Laurel Alford who graciously agreed to sew labels and hanging sleeves on.

A magnificent weekend across The Pond at Hever Castle where blocks were made and people were commemorated.

I am honored to be invited to spend Saturday morning, 9/2 with the Dixie Wing Angel Squad, telling them about The 70273 Project. They’ve decided to make enough blocks to make their own quilt, something I consider a Very Good Idea.

Week 81, September 4-10, 2017
Michelle Freedman (@stitchwellandprosper on Instagram) hosted a Block Drive at Modern Domestic on 9/4. People made blocks and watched Quilt #219 being quilted on the long arm.

Quilt 219

Bethany Sharpton and Chris Petersen from WXII 12 News came and interviewed me about The 70273 Project. Bethany also treated me to a solo-exhibit-of-her-quilts-for-one.

Week 83: September 4-10, 2017
Hurricane (Tropical Storm by the time she reached us) irma came; the power went, remaining out from Monday night till Friday morning.

The 70273 Project received a financial donation from Frances Holliday Alford, who makes a monthly donation. Thank you, Frances! You have supported The 70273 Project in every way imaginable. it does not go unnoticed or unappreciated.

Over and around all of these highlights, much work was going on – most of which I’ll tell you about in blog posts coming soon. Blocks were bundled, so let me know if you’d like to And quilts were registered and added to the official block count. Would you like to make your own quilt and register it with The 70273 Project? Or turn a bundle of blocks into a quilt? Perhaps you’d like to make a Middling for The 70273 Project? And remember that we still and always accept blocks, so get those needles threaded and go forth to stitch more commemorations.

And that’s not all: I still have many, many, many blocks and entire quilts waiting to be checked in and counted. This week, I spent my time checking in these complete, finished quilts (and I only mention the block makers because we’re counting the blocks. Full information will be included when I profile each quilt in its own blog post)

Quilt 14, a Middling by yours truly
Quilt 15, another Middling by moi
Quilt 58 (the extra blocks made by Margaret Williams to complete the top)
Quilt 59 (extra blocks created by Margaret Williams to complete the top)
Quilt 65 (blocks made by Sandy martin to complete the top)
Quilt 71 (blocks made by Brighter Skies, Elizabeth Budgeon, Savvy Christophides, Jane Coulter, Joyce duncan, Chrissie Fitzgerald, Margaret Grieves, Helen Grindley, Margaret Jackson, C. Knight, Shirley Gliver, V. Pearson, Linda Smalley, Ellen Smith, and Mary Turner)
Quilt 73 (blocks made by Mary Turner, Margaret Jackson, and others)
Quilt 105 (blocks made by Alexandrian Pattin to complete the top)
Quilt 111 (made by Cathrine Symchych)
Quilt 127 (from Nouvelle Aquitaine – blocks made by Nicole John, Magali Sallard, Francoise Sebilleau, Francoise Frontenaud, Francoise Lelionnais, Adrienne, maryLou Renault, and Annie Sellier)
Quilt 128 (from Nouvelle Aquitaine with blocks made by Nanette Andersen, C. Andersen, Town Andersen, Marie Alice Wilke, Nome Wilke, Raphael Wilke, Charlotte Wilke, Camille Wilke, Lunette Arrive, Micheline Monvoisin, Jacqueline Guichard, Taffathe Saldani, Francoise Lelionnais, Francoise Fresneau, Marie-Jeanne Pannier, and Nicole Brard)
Quilt 141 (blocks made by Makers from Belgium and members of Du Club de Leognan France)
Quilt 145 (a Middling by Cathy Busson)
Quilt 149 (blocks made by Eva Jackson)
Quilt 152 (a Middling made by Chantal Trouillot)
Quilt 153 (blocks by Christine Richter (Germany), Pia Magnusson (Sweden), Annette Lenk (Germany), and Hannah (Germany))
Quilt 156 (blocks by Anne Vignals and Anonymous Makers)
Quilt 159 (a Middling made by Danielle Birello)
Quilt 177 (a Middling made by Deirdre McConathy)
Quilt 178 (blocks made by Members of Club Aussillion – Danielle Albert, Genevieve Bacque, Sylvaine Benezech, Regine Cahuzac, Cecile Milhau, Michele Mouton, Suzanne Pons, Fina Rodriguez, Lillians Several, Yvette Trombetta, and Lesley Westlake)
Quilt 173 (blocks made by members of the Leisure Time Crafting and Brighter Skies Fundraising Group of Spennymoor, Durham, UK)
Quilt 179 (a Middling made by Cindy Cavallo)
Quilt 186 (a Middling made by Debra Steinmann)
Quilt 210, (a Middling made by Jane M. McCarthy)

Wanna’ know the current official block count? You don’t? Oh you jokesters, you.

As of yesterday, the current official block count is . . . . 24,166! (Scroll to the bottom of the page to see how our graph is filling up!) The Engineer tells me that we are slightly more than one-third of the way to our goal, so please, y’all, keep stitching and telling and sending.

SaveSave

SaveSave

WXII Coverage of The 70273 Project

L to R: Bethany, Andy (The Engineer), Moi, Chris

Thanks to Hurricane Irma, we have been without power, phone, and internet since Monday night. It just came back on, so this will be short because it’s still flickering and promising to go off again at any time. Just thought y’all would like to see the video and article Bethany Sharpton created for WXII 12 News. Go here to see it on their site and here to see it on Facebook. Please share to help spread the word and comment to show Bethany and WXII our appreciation.

 

 

SaveSave

SaveSave

WXII Came A-Calling

Q: How do people find out about The 70273 Project?
A: Through high tech social media and good old-fashioned grass roots spreading and every way in between.

Jeanne and Bethany with her first quilt. She had to borrow a sewing machine and rotary cutter. We’re talking total novice, y’all.

So once upon a time, there was a lovely lass named Bethany, a newspaper reporter on assignment. When Bethany commented on the lovely quilts, the tables were turned and she was asked if she was a quilter. Her answer that day was no, but soon enough, our Bethany took the advise of the woman she was interviewing and signed up for one of Denniele Bohannen’s classes, and the rest, as they say,  is her story.

Then the day came when Bethany landed a job just over yonder from me  in North Carolina, and today she and Chris brought the camera and microphone and spent the morning in The Dissenter’s Chapel & Snug (my studio) looking at The 70273 Project quilts, asking good questions, and listening to my answers and stories. I don’t know when I’ve had so much fun, y’all.

In her star quilt, there were bicycles for her mother, an avid cyclist . . .

and a nod to science (atoms) for her dad . . .

and newspaper for journalist self. I see a theme in Bethany’s quilts: black and what and read all over. Or for those of you who don’t remember that childhood riddle, journalistic communication. It’s part of Bethany’s life, and it’s part of her quilty signature.

Bethany and her Churn Dash quilt she made in another one of Denniele’s classes. Note the backing fabric. Just sayin’.

And you know what else? Bethany brought a suitcase filled with her beautiful quilts and treated me to a private showing-for-one exhibit of her quilts. Pinch me.

Chris wanted to get a shot of me making blocks on my sewing machine – a 44 year old beauty The Engineer bought for me with proceeds from winning two radio contests the first year we were married. Now for all you eagle-eyed stitchers and non-stitchers who like finding bloops in films, if you  see this story  on the WXII  web site, you’ll chortle when you note that I ran out of thread before I’d stitched a single leg of a single red X. “Keep stitching,” Chris said, so I stitched and stitched and stitched some more . . . without any thread in the bobbin!

You’ll be hearing more about Bethany and Chris in another blog post coming later this week, so stay tuned.  Thank you, Bethany and Chris, for this wonderful opportunity to let people know about The 70273 Project. It was so much fun, and I’m serious about y’all coming back with your families for a weekend. I’ll leave the light on.

More Blocks Made at Hever Castle

More than 100 people were commemorated yesterday
at the Hever Castle Quilt Show
– which is part of the Hever Castle Festival of Homemade and Homegrown –
and more Makers showed up today
to commemorate those we honor in The 70273 Project.
Like this smiling International Quilt Judge
seen here standing in front of the gorgeous quilt she made.
She came yesterday, pledged to make 25 blocks,
and returned today with 26 blocks in hand.
Then I want y’all to know, she sat down and
commemorated 6 more people.
And that’s not all. Before leaving,
she promised to tell her large 300+ member quilting group
about The 70273 Project and get them involved.

Edina Geering – the beautiful woman on the right
wearing the Team 70273 badge on her lapel – was back today.
Edina and Lucy Horner are responsible for this
wonderfully successful event,
and Lucy is, once again, the one who took these captivating photos.

People of all ages filled the booth throughout the day,
learning of The 70273 Project and making blocks.

Edina’s granddaughters, Abigail and Imogene
came to lend a hand today as did Lucy’s daughter, Gabby.

“It made me well up listening to them explain The 70273 Project
to people as they went round handing out leaflets,”
Lucy says of Abigail, Imogene, and Gabby.
“Gabby was brilliant at talking to people
and keeping everyone entertained!”

Meet Sally who came today
and brought – wait for it –
the FIRST QUILT she’s ever made!
Isn’t it amazing?
And it measure 5′ x 8′.

“Oh, and we met Anne Boleyn, too,” writes Lucy.
“Hever Castle was her childhood home.”
(I’ll bet Anne’s dress would have Scarlett O’Hara
drooling all over herself!)

Thank you to all who helped make the
Hever Castle Block Drive so wildly successful,
and thank you to
those who commemorated so many people this weekend.

Would you like to hose a Block Drive for a group or event in your area?
Let me know and I’ll send you everything you need.
And remember: tomorrow is the Block Drive
at Modern Domestic in Portland, OR.
If you can’t be there to make blocks
but would like to have blocks in the Modern Domestic quilt,
do what I’m going to do: mail your blocks to them.

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

Blocks Being Made at the Hever Castle Quilt Show

This weekend, thanks to Lucy Horner and Edina Geering – two dynamos if ever there was such a woman – blocks for The 70273 Project are being made across The Pond at the Hever Castle Festival of Homemade and Homegrown. Let’s drop in, shall we, using the delightful photos and words of Lucy Horner . . .


Such an amazing day at Hever Castle spent spreading the message and love of The 70273 Project. 70 blocks made, 100’s of people talked to, and some beautiful smiles captured in this all-inclusive Project. Our last block maker of the day was from Hamburg, and I loved that she was wearing the globe. We are there all weekend, so if you fancy a day out to the Festival of Homemade and Homegrown and the Hever Quilt Show, do stop by.

Such a beautiful spot! These quilts have such personality.
I love putting them under my arm and showing them the sights!

It’s a beautiful team effort.
This weekend was organized by the Mover & Shaker called Edina Geering,
and boy she really gets things going and keeps things moving! 

I love how hands-on Edina is!
This is Victor. He was fab. He was saying that he is in the Brighton School of Samba
and they have here tabbards for a gig
which are white with a red heart.
He was going to get his group to cut them up for blocks,
but I said “Woah. We need you and your samba band in your tabbards
celebrating The 70273 Project!”
He told me to email him some dates.

 

 

 

 Stewards are always standing by to make sure that visitors
touch the quilts with their eyes only.

Liliana (5)  and Rosie (3) with blocks they made
with Edina and Linda pictured in the background.

They’re wearing dresses their mum made for them.

 

Celebrate / Commemorate . . . it’s a balance.
I talked till my lips stuck to my teeth.
But these quilts are a noisy lot!
They were stopping people in their tracks.
We’d thrown one over the entrance gate,
and a lady said, “I saw it in the distance, and it shouted out to me.
I got shivers when I got up close to it.”
The voiceless sing a beautiful song.


Thank you, Lucy, Edina, and other members of
The British Isles Quilter’s Guild
who are on hand to offer instruction and encouragement.
And thank you to everybody who felt strongly enough
to risk doing something new and doing something imperfectly.
If you’re in the area and you read this in time,
skip on over there and make a block.
And hey, be sure to send me a photo.

~~~~~~~

Now if you’re going to be in the vicinity
of Portland, Oregon (USA)
on Monday, 9/4/17,
stop by Modern Domestic to meet Michelle Freeman,
make blocks for the Modern Domestic quilt,
and see The 70273 Project Quilt #219 under the long arm.

~~~~~~~

Are you hosting a Block Party? Let me know and send photos!

SaveSave

SaveSave

Quilt 219 Is Coming Together

The evolution of Michelle Freedman’s involvement in The 70273 Project:
1. We meet on Instagram where she is known as @stitchwellandprosper.
2. Michelle makes some beautiful blocks.
3. She asks me to send her a bundle of blocks to Piece and Quilt.
4. Michelle makes plans to host a Special Event at Modern Domestic (isn’t that a fantastic name?!) where people are invited to make blocks and see Quilt #231 being quilted on the long arm.
5. I ask Michelle to be a guest blogger.
6. She accepts, and sends these good words . . .

My 70,273 Journey, Part One.

The 70,273 Project snuck up on me and took me by surprise. What were these quilts that were at once beautiful to look at and tragic to bear? It was a story I didn’t know. It was a story I wanted to tell.

The red XX blocks first caught my eye on social media. My friend Lori was on a quilting retreat and sharing photos of blocks she was making there. I was curious about what she was up to. A few weeks later she popped into the shop where I work. When I asked her to tell me about about the blocks, she replied with the story of The 70,273 Project. I found myself fighting back tears and feeling shocked. Holocaust stories are never easy to hear, but this one was unimaginable. I needed to be involved.

I set up my first block sewing day this past July. My friend Cynthia stopped by and we made a few blocks together. Stitching these first XX blocks was meaningful but I couldn’t shake the feeling of being out of my emotional comfort zone. It was not easy to imagine that each block represented someone who was murdered for such a cruel reason. The more blocks I made, the more it felt like I was stitching up a wound that would never heal.

In the days that followed, I found myself waking up in the middle of the night from bad dreams. I wondered if this project was stirring up some of my deepest fears. I reflected on how I never felt completely comfortable with my Jewish heritage. Maybe I was a product of the times or maybe it was a form of emotional self-protection. Either way this had cracked open something I was used to hiding.

After the first block making experience I reached out to Jeanne and asked her if I could assemble a quilt top, and I decided to host a second Red XX block sewing day. Then Charlottesville happened. Stunned, grieved, sickened — I can not begin to describe how I felt watching images of what happened that day. People were using the words Nazi, Hitler, and Swastika in the present tense. It was surreal. I was angry. My fears escalated. I was in shock.

When the pieces for quilt #219 arrived, I took a deep breath. It was comforting to know there were people all over the world who were telling this story, making blocks, and making quilts. I spent time looking at each block and thinking about the person who made it. I imagined them sewing, painting, drawing, and looking for that perfect piece of red fabric to use for each X. I imagined the papers with the XX marks on them. I tried to imagine who those people were, people who’s fate was determined by medical records and indifference. It felt present, possible, terrifying…

The block numbers in quilt #219 range from 126 to 8,503. Some of the first blocks made for this project were going to be in this quilt! I sketched out a quilt map and found that I was one block short for the design. I read through the papers Jeanne had sent to see what I was supposed to do. Did each quilt have a space for a blank block? Was I supposed to make my own and add it? There were a few ideas to weigh. I gave myself space to make a decision as I assembled the top. When it came time to add in the missing block, I cut a piece of white fabric and stared at it. I asked it what to do. An image of a pregnant woman came into my mind. I knew who the block was for and left it blank.

The 70273 Project is not comfortable to talk about, nor do I want to be comforted. What I’d like is for you to join me in allowing this project to be in your life, to let it stir up feelings and start conversations, for you to make blocks or seek out what others have made for this project and ask them why. I can’t guarantee that you will enjoy the experience, and chances are it will feel uncomfortable, but I know it will be worth it.  

Please join me on Labor Day, Monday, September 4 at Modern Domestic to make blocks and quilt #219. The event is free, and machines, materials, and supplies are available (or bring your own.) Children are welcome with adult supervision.

Can’t join us this time? Mail us your finished blocks with the completes provenance forms here and become part of the Modern Domestic quilt we are creating for The 70273 Project:
Modern Domestic / 422 NE Alberta St. / Portland Oregon, 97211

~~~~~~~

Michelle Freedman lives and quilts in Portland, Oregon. She is a sewing educator and staff member at Modern Domestic and volunteers for the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF, and another things Michelle and I have in common). Follow her on Instagram @stitchwellandprosper or email her at designcamppdx@gmail.com, and please, if you’re in the vicinity of Portland, Oregon, put Monday, 9/4/17 on your calendar and plan to go by and make some blocks. If you’re not in the area and/or are unable to attend the Modern Domestic Block Drive on 9/4, you can still be part of the Modern ‘Domestic quilt by making some blocks and mail them to Michelle.

If I knew who to thank at Instagram for providing the opportunity to meet Michelle, I’d pen and mail the note this afternoon. Thank you, Michelle, for being such a committed member of The 70273 Project. I am especially moved by the “pregnant” block, and I’m so glad our paths have crossed.

~~~~~~~

Would you like for your business, group, or organization to make a quilt? Let me know, and I’ll talk you through it. It’s not hard, I promise.

Recap: Weeks 70 to 78 (June 12 – August 13, 2017)

Quilt #44 made by the Can’canettes in France

So much water has gone under the bridge since I posted last . . . where to start?

ACCOMPLISHMENTS
~ Prepared and submitted a proposal to be a  Special Exhibit at the International Quilt Festival in Houston, TX in November
~ Began a complete web site makeover for The 70273 Project, but what with family issues and commitments and that pesky thing known as the paying job, it is coming along at the speed of cold molasses
~ Applied for an Interactive Booth at the International Quilt Festival (more about this soon)
~ Began dividing up my work into Areas of Responsibilities, streamlining and documenting my systems, and recruiting people to take over leadership of various Areas of Responsibilities. More about that soon, too.
~ Created labels for umpteen quilts

The Temple in Lacaze, Fance

ACCOLADES
~ We were juried in to be a Special Exhibit at the International Quilt Festival. I’ll need help, so be watching for sign-up sheets.
~ At the end of the day of the exhibit, the Mayor of Lacaze informed me of his intention to have a permanent shield created that will become a permanent part of the Temple declaring that The 70273 Project exhibited here.

Judy Jochen at the second Peachtree City Library Block Drive on 8/5/2017

EXHIBITS AND TRAVEL
There has been much travel in the past 8 weeks:
~ June 17 found me in Georgia at the Peachtree City Library for their first block drive. It was a rousing success. Big thanks to Peggy Thomas for being there to help plan and present to Jill Prouty, Library Administrator and Rebecca Watts, Circulation Supervisor for embracing and supporting The 70273 Project.
~
The Engineer and I  were in France for in France from June 20 to June 27  for the first major European exhibit of The 70273 Project in Lacaze.
~ We visited Nancy June 29 to July 6.
~ On July 5 I was delighted and honored to tell members of the dynamic group known as the  Orlando Modern Quilt Guild (of which I am now a proud dues-paying member, I want you to know) about The 70273 Project.
~ The first Work Day for The 70273 Project at the Peachtree City Library on July 25, and again I thank Peggy Thomas for handling all things sewing-related; Wendy Darling for handling all things non-sewing related; Jill Prouty for letting us use a room; Laurel Alford for coming with her sewing machine to make and attach and amend hanging sleeves then taking some home to work on; Patti Atchley for coming and sewing on labels and taking quilts home to sew on more labels; Leslie Wade for bringing food when she came to help; Joan Veslmid, Mike Ray, and Sherry Stone Blackmon of Keller Williams Realty for showing up to help and learn more; Kelly Blackmon, Adele Klingshirn, Kim Mashburn for helping bundle blocks; and of course to The Engineer for schlepping things to and fro, fro and to. Everybody who came said they left knowing a lot more about The 70273 Project than they did when they arrived . . . which  means, well, there’s something fun coming up in the near future.
~ Peggy Thomas taped and posted the first FB Live for The 70273 Project  at the work day, two of them, actually!
~ The second Peachtree City Library block drive was held on August 5, and again, it was a rousing success. Many people who came and made blocks at the first block drive came back, and many new people came to sew blocks. Peggy Thomas was on hand again, as was Jan Ward from the first block drive and Patti Atchley (from the first work day) to make blocks and help.
~ All around these dates, we’ve been entertaining company or out of town finishing up our daughter’s move, helping her with a yard sale, readying a house to sell, and babysitting in Denver.

Quilt #225 made by Beatrice Dockter (This quilt is so soft, I wanted to sleep under it.)

QUILTS
Just today, I gave out Quilt #226! I don’t have all of them in my hands, but I have many in my hands and more arriving every day. Though it’s possibly an incomplete list, due to the fact that checking in blocks and quilts requires me to be home to fetch them from the post office, thank you to these good people for sending me quilts. If you don’t see your name here, don’t panic. It could very well mean that I simply haven’t had time to open your package and check your quilt in yet.
Esther Muh
Sylvie Corrager
Australian Quilt Association
Jan Stone
Elaine Fields Smith and Amy Castillo (I received 3 quilts from Elaine!)
Members of the Truckee Meadows Quilt Guild
Beatrice Dockter
Margaret Andrews (2 quilts, actually!)
Jane McCarthy
Peggy Thomas
Nan Ryan
Maria Conway
Debra Woods
Members of the Thimbleberry Lovers online quilting group
Kris Phillips and Debra Woods
Sharlene Jespersen
Sarah Lauzon
Alejandrina Pattin

Bundles ready to go

BUNDLES
Thank you to these good people for offering to Piece, Quilt, or both bundles of blocks:
Patti Lapinsky (3 bundles)
Cindy Cavallo (2 bundles)
Michelle Freedman (1 bundle)
Margaret Williams (5 bundles)
Debra Jorbert and Karol Evans (1 bundle)
Mary Sorensen (1 bundle)
Zonetta Glenn and Debra Jolbert (1 bundle)
Laura Brained (1 bundle)
Alejandrina Pattin (1 bundle)

Incoming Week 77

BLOCKS
Thank you to these good people for sending blocks (though the same caveat applies: if you don’t see your name, it could be that I haven’t been home long enough to check your blocks in):
Deborah L. J. MacKinnon (USA)
Suzy Jubin (Switzerland)
Layette Martin (France)
Chantal Sogno (France)
Christine Prades (France)
Marie-Claude Paris (Netherlands)
Nadine Gaudin (France)
Janette Resano (France)
Dominique Bernot (France)
Annie Rimbault (France)
Nicole Dufour (France)
Yolanda Dray (France)
Anonymous
Martine Priarli (France)
Marie Claire Vagnati (France)
Laetitia Brugere (France)
Dominique Deutsch (France)
Danielle Fayet (France)
Claire Schwartz (France)
Christianne Humbert (France)
Chloe Grice (France)
Cecile Dennis (France)
Kellye Rose (USA)
Judy Pirtle (USA)
Susan Getchell (USA)
Alida Palmisano (USA)
Mary Robak (USA)
Kathryn Wagner (Canada)
Emma Suleiman (USA)
Catherine Rozenknop (France)
M. Bonnot (France)
Christine Guillermer (France)
Marie-Jose Perin (France)
Alejandrina Pattin (USA)

BLOCK COUNT
Our current block count is: 19306!
Scroll to the bottom of the screen to see the graph and watch our cylinder as it fills.
And just think: there are still more quilts and blocks to be mailed, checked in and/or fetched from the post office! Give yourselves a hand and please accept my deepest gratitude that you’ve chosen to spent your time and talent commemorating these people who didn’t deserve to die because they are different.

« Older posts

© 2017 Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑