Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

& her barefoot heart

Day Three in France: Toulouse

23 June 2017
Friday

You know when you are greeted with . . .

Tari Vickery and Katell Renon


a carousel

a statue listening intently to a bird,

and a dog so tired from playing that he went to sleep with the ball in his mouth.
(That, or the area is known for its dog-on-dog crime.)
it’s gonna be a day filled with fun and love.
And it is.
It really, really is.

Perhaps it’s because we’re two sleeps away
from The 70273 Project Exhibit at Lacaze, France,
that I spy pairs of X’s throughout Toulouse.

 

(I’ve fallen head over heels in love with Toulouse blue!)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Glass panels

at the Orly airport

and light through my upside down glass
that made me think of Nancy’s drawings.

There is a sewing shop

the courthouse where Katell and Patrick were wed,

bicycles that made me smile

shades of blue that come with history and story
(I don’t know why the photo is wonky.
Just turn your head or your computer screen
cause I’ve wrestled with it long enough.
I need to go to bed!)

 

and real windows and painted windows on the same home
that make me think how some people behave.

And hearts. Oh my goodness, there are hearts everywhere in Toulouse.

on the sidewalk

and  in patches of moss.

There are hearts that, if you look at them one way,
might resemble roosters

There are teapot hearts that short and stout,
with feet and handles of love
and spew love out into the world through their spout.

And as we head to the parking lot, I spy this tote bag.

Then we close out the day
at the beautiful, comfortable, welcoming home
of Katell and Patrick Renon.
I am one lucky, grateful woman.
Oh yes, yes I am.

I’m also a woman who’s a day behind with posts
because the days are full here
and when night comes, I fall asleep before I hit the bed.
There will be more photos of Paris and Toulouse on
Instagram if you’re interested,
and I promise to do my best to catch up tomorrow,
even though tomorrow is a Very Big Day, you know.

Day Two in France: Paris

Day Two is a day of stories, friendship, quilts, and pairs of X’s . . .

This morning, dear Chantal showed up at our rented flat with the first Friendship Block for The 70273 Project. What is a friendship block, you ask? Well, it’s something I’d planned to wait to tell you about till July 1, but looks like I need to go ahead and tell you now since I’ve got and spilled the beans early.

We’re borrowing a page from the history books and creating Friendship Quilts to raise funds for The 70273 Project. You take a red marker and write your name, using your first name as one of the lines in the red X and your last name as the second line that crosses the first line in the red X. For the other red X, you can write the name of the person you dedicate your block to – maybe an ancestor, a friend, a family member, a student – or maybe you do like Chantal did and make a collaborative friendship block. Ask a friend or loved one or even me to use their name to make the second red X. Then you send the block with a financial donation that will be much appreciated and well used, I promise. If you live in the US, you will also receive a receipt for your income tax report. So that, my friends, is what a Friendship Block is. Friendship blocks will be used only in Friendship quilts, too, by the way, and they will be counted as commemorative blocks.

Our first stop was heaven. Or, as some of you might call it, a fabric shop. But not just any fabric shop. This is the fabric store little girl Chantal visited with her mother, and every time they went, young Chantal secretly wished that this would be the day her mother bought fabric to make a dress just for Chantal instead of another hand-me-down dress she would get when her sister outgrew it.

When I heard that, I knew what I wanted – nay, I knew what I just had to do: buy the fabric for Calder Ray’s sleeping quilt. And I did. Found some beautiful soft fabric in the blue that he loves. And what’s in Chantal’s bag, you might ask? Well, she bought herself some lovely fabric . . . to make herself a dress.

I love everything about this shop . . . the quilted floors,

The doll-size mannequins wearing the most smashing outfits. Chantal says she remembers them being here when she was a little girl coming with a special wish.

Though we took our time looking around, it was eventually time to leave, and let me tell youThe Engineer was sad to leave, too . . . because the store was air conditioned.

We visited the Chapelle du Saint-Sacrement, where Chantal was gracious enough to find shady inclines instead of full sun steps.

There are quilts everywhere in that church . . . at the door, I spy borders.

On the floor, I spy quilts..

On the altar, I spy a quilt.

On the floor, I spy a colorful quilt of stained glass reflections appliquéd onto the floor “blocks”.

In the ancient stained glass, I see a 9-block with much color and intrigue surrounding it.

I fall head-over-heels in love with these modern quilts . . . I mean windows . . . and Chantal and I take a seat in front of them and talk about not just the windows, but Nancy and The 70273 Project and quilting techniques.

In the ceiling, I find two X’s, and I imagine they are red.

And on our exit, I get another view of Paris.

On the nearby multi-function place, I see more X’s that, if you squint your eyes just right, can be red.

In the area where artist have long set up stalls, I spy a blue, white, and red 9-patch.

We enjoy a French pancake breakfast for a late lunch. It was delicious, and there was a heart in my sweet pancake. A heart. That’s what this trip has been filled with.

I wish y’all would look at the bottom of the chairs, something I didn’t see till just now . . . two more X’s.

it was cooler today, in part because of the spectacular clouds, in part because of the constant breeze, and in part because Chantal went out of her way to find shade for us to walk in. And it was another lovely day spent with the darling Chantal who gives us time from her busy schedule. I am so very grateful for that and for all she does to commemorate the 70,273.

Three more sleeps till the first major European exhibit for The 70273 Project. How will I manage to sleep with all the anticipation and excitement? Pfffft. I can sleep on the flight home.

It’s Wednesday So It Must Be Paris!

A pictorial diary of our first day in Paris . . .

The Engineer and The Artist, on the plane!

finally what i dream about: hours and hours of uninterrupted stitching time!

i love this view of Earth

and this one

Though it began in a very stressful adventurous manner, we arrive in Paris on time and even better, so did our luggage!

a heart on the bathroom floor in the Paris airport portends how this trip will unfold and long be remembered

Dear Chantal Baquin meets us at the airport and will spend our time in Paris with us. We are so very lucky to have her!

Chantal’s friend Peter came to drive us from the airport, giving us a tour of the city of Paris on our way. We are lucky to have him, too! Our trip starts with much friendship.

love the chairs in the Paris airport

After leaving the airport, we see . . .

traffic!

Arc de Triomphe

Arc de Triomphe detail

The Eiffel Tower from afar

The Eiffel Tower up close (It’s much bigger up close!)

The obelisk Napoleon brought from Egypt as a souvenir

A fetching tile mural

Moulin Rouge

The Louvre

The Louvre, old and new

a wall that on the left makes me think of a quilt

Notre Dame

a garden (with an available bench!) near Notre Dame where we rested and watched wedding photos being taken

statues

the siene river

 

It is HOT here in Paris. I glisten all day long. Scroll back up to see my hair at the beginning of the day, now see what it looks like at the end of the day. This, my friends, is the mark of a full and well-enjoyed day!

Under Two Flags

Napkins stitched by French women during World War I

When Germany entered northern France early in World War I, they showed no mercy. The countryside was devastated, and women struggled to survive while the men were off fighting in the war. One way French women put food on the table is through  their stitchery – detailed cross-stitch depictions of soldiers, flags, coats of arms, and other representations of the main Allied forces – that was sold in America through the Society for Employment of Women in France, with all the proceeds going back to the French women and their families.

Excerpts from a June 1916 letter from Mercy Richards Essig (Mrs. Norman Sturgis Essig), 1700 Locust Street, Philadelphia that accompanied some of these items paint a vivid picture of the women’s lives and their efforts at survival: “The women sit inside their houses under fire constantly, and embroider. When a shell is heard on its way they duck into the cellars until it bursts, and then come out again at once. The cellars are all marked—that is[,] the safe ones, with signs pointing to them and telling their capacity. The women who embroider are those whose men—sons, husbands, and fathers are at the front or wounded or killed . . .”

And that’s not all . . .

In 1914, Anne Morgan (daughter of John Pierpoint Morgan) spent a week visiting the Marne battlefields in France, and what she was so horrified by what she saw that she created the Committee for Devastated France (CARD) with offices in New York and chapters across the U.S., all dedicated to raising money to provide relief work in France. Activities of CARD were documented in the weekly bulletin called Under Two Flags. CARD offices were located in Château de Blérancourt that was later restored by Anne Morgan and turned into a museum dedicated to the friendship and cooperation between the France and the United States.

Today, The Engineer and I take a seat in the big chair in the sky and make our way to France where we will enjoy a current-day continuation of the rich, long-standing tradition of French and American women working together in friendship and caring. I can’t wait to call many women I already consider friend Sugar to their face and hug them in real – not digital – hugs. We will laugh together, and no doubt shed a few tears together as we attend the first major European exhibit of The 70273 Project in Lacaze, France on Sunday, June 25, 2017. You can read more about the exhibit and what hundreds of French volunteers did to commemorate another day when the United States and France worked together on the blog of my friend Katell Renon, who has worked tirelessly to coordinate the making and collection of the 55 quilts that will be included in the exhibit. Many have worked with great dedication to make this exhibit happen, and I will introduce you to them throughout the week, I am deeply honored and grateful like you wouldn’t believe to the women of France and to the Association France Patchwork for their dynamism, for their obvious deep feelings about the commemorations we undertake, and for the hospitality and kindness they have already extended. These women don’t dwell in the past, but they don’t forget it either, knowing that forgetting is the first paver in the road to allowing history to repeat itself – something that will not happen on our watch.

I’ve been brushing up on my French, and today I learned how to say “Pinch me”, something I expect I’ll be saying a lot to make sure this is really happening.

I’ll be posting from France here on the blog, on Facebook here and here and here, and on Instagram. I will also be taking lots of photos and gathering lots of stories that I will assemble in a catalogue of the exhibit when I get back to the States – a catalogue that will be available for sale to raise money to ship the quilts to their next destination and ultimately . . . eventually . . .  here to Heartquarters for photographing for the book and preparation for The Great Gathering and Launch.

~~~~~~~

Places to find more information about the rich tradition of French and American women working together:

http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/object-groups/women-in-wwi/introduction

http://americanhistory.si.edu/collections/object-groups/women-in-wwi/french-stitchery

https://www.theworldwar.org/explore/exhibitions/online-exhibitions/american-women-rebuilding-france

Many thanks to the Smithsonian Institute, to the National World War I Museum and Memorial, and these people for allowing me to use these images and for doing and sharing the research provided on their web site.

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Week 69: June 9-15, 2017 Recap

Week 69 – up and down the road we went. One night atop the mountain, then it was right back down. Highlights of the week include . . .

EVENTS:
On Saturday, 6/17/17, Peggy Thomas and I held a block drive at the Peachtree City Library in Peachtree City, GA. When Library Administrator Jill Prouty stopped by our booth at Fayette Woman Live last March to hear about The 70273 Project and make a block, she immediately invited us to hold a block drive as part of their summer theme, Build a Better World. We immediately said Yes.

Many blocks were made on Saturday – including blocks from people visiting Peachtree City from China, India, and Australia! Peggy and I proposed to Rebecca Watts, Circulation Supervisor, that they collect blocks throughout the summer and make a Peachtree City Library Quilt in the fall. Rebecca not only agreed, she asked if she could display some Middlings on the ends of the shelves. Guess what I said! Peggy is creating go bags of materials to make blocks, so when you stop by the library to grab your bag or turn in your blocks, take a minute to look at Middlings 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, and 52 made by Margaret Williams (Tucker, GA USA) and Middling #134 made by Maria Conway (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

BLOG POSTS WRITTEN:
Annie Labruyere paid a heartwarming visit to the vocational school Armand Malaise in Charleville-Mezieres, France, and she wrote about it in Episode 1 and Episode 2

Wendy Reed’s involvement in The 70273 Project has grown since she first heard about it. Here’s the latest.

Katell Renon (what would I do without her?) writes about another example of how French and Americans work together with creativity and dedication to ensure that history is not forgotten.

And in case you missed it, Katell writes of the upcoming-won’t-be-long-now First Major European Exhibit of The 70273 Project in Lacaze, France that she and many others have worked tirelessly to bring into being.

DONATIONS RECEIVED:
Frances Holliday Alford – Thank you!

The 70273 Project Quilt 141, made by Debra Woods

BLOCKS & QUILTS RECEIVED:
Quilt 134: Maria Conway: (Argentina) 202 commemorations
Quilt 141: Debra Woods (USA)  (31 commemorations)
Suzy Jubin (Switzerland)
Layette Martin (France)
Chantal Sogno (France)
Christine Prades (France)
Marie-Claude Paris (Netherlands)
Nadine Gaudin (France)
Janette Resano (France)
Dominique Bernot (France)
Annie Rimbault (France)
Nicole Dufour (France)
Yolanda Dray (France)
Martine Priarli (France)
Marie Claire Vagnati (France)
Laetitia Brugere (France)
Dominique Deutsch (France)
Danielle Fayet (France)
Claire Schwartz (France)
Christianne Humbert (France)
Chloe Grice (France)
Cecile Dennis (France)
Anonymous

Which brings our block count to: 18,078! 

Thank y’all for continuing to commemorate, and remember: June is Middling Month (though you can make a Middling any time, of course), so maybe you want to kick the summer off (depending on what part of the world you call Home) by stretching your creative wings.

On we grow as on we sew!

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Quilt #187, a Middling made by Laurie Dunn

The 70273 Project Quilt #187, a Middling made by Laurie Dunn

Laurie writes . . .

“What is a middling?”  I asked. “made from fat quarter size fabric.” (Really–those little bundles tied up at the fabric store unfold?)   A small quilt. Someone shared a picture.  I was getting it. Remember I am not a quilter.  

Quilt #187, a Middling by Laurie Dunn

I cut fabric the required size plus a half inch. I grabbed my embroidery hoop and the spool of red sewing thread I had been using and began to stitch pairs of X’s. Always in pairs. I absent-mindedly follow the curve of the hoop. When it got awkward, I moved the hoop. Continued and removed the hoop. Hmmmm. Looks like a heart, sort of. So I tried to continue the heart idea. XX of various stitches, various sizes. My January project.

I took my thread and my hoop to visit my 91 year old Dad. “Are you going to finish it by Valentine’s Day?” he asked as I was still working on it after his February 3rd birthday. A new deadline.

Jeanne asked me how it felt to make a Middling. I started with trepidation. I am not a quilter. This is taking a lot of time if it is not right. I set it aside, picked it up, took it to work when I watched the grandkids.

Quilt #187, a Middling made by Laurie Dunn

One of the Monthly Mixer challenges was “a picture of the smallest pair of XX you can find.” That somehow gave me the freedom to make very small XX pairs. And that led me to thinking of small individuals – how young were the lives we are remembering. Some of the individuals I work with are adults but are of very small stature for their age. Some of my pairs were prickly, some stout. My pairs marched and meandered . . . is that how “our” individuals entered the gas chambers?

Quilt #187, a Middling by Laurie Dunn

When I got my decidedly wonky heart shape finished, I counted 200 pairs. Then I added 14 more larger ones from fabric – just because that is how many fit. I cut the back and the filling (an old felted waterbed pad – my mother-in-law always used old blankets for batting in her quilts.) I stitched around the edges – pillow case style – a term I learned form fellow participants in The 70273 Project. My plan had been to machine stitch between the rows of pairs of X’s. Around the inside of the heart I went. Then the inside of the inside row. I could not do more, the rows seemed too close together. I sent a picture to Chloe Grice asking if she thought it was “right”. She said to post it, so I did, and y’all (another term I’m learning from this group!), y’all hit “like”. No one said to add more quilting.

Laurie Dunn and Quilt #187, a Middling

Took it to show my dad. He got a big grin. Later on that evening, he suddenly said, “Don’t do any more quilting.” I have always tried to obey my dad.

I keep looking at it, moving it from place to place. I still need to put a sleeve on the back. It is very much like a baby blanket, like a baby I’m not ready to send into the world quite yet.

~~~~~~~

Laurie, your Middling and your words are tender and quite touching. I am moved by the fact that as you say, you are not a quilter, and yet you feel so deeply about the people you work with and the people we commemorate that you simply cut the fabric, thread the needle, and start. You may  have been working on it since January, but you’ll finish it in June, which as you know, is Middling Month! Please hug your dad for me next time you see him, and tell him what I always ask you to tell him: that I thank him for his service and for the daughter who is now my friend.

Quilt #179, a Middling Made by Cindy Cavallo

The 70,273 Project Quilt #179 made by Cindy Cavallo

Dear Jeanne,

My name is Cindy Cavallo. I am a lifetime Reno, Nevada resident. I retired from University of Nevada-Reno in December of 2012, where I was an instructor of Interior Design for 11.5 years. I taught Residential Design, Housing, and Textiles, with Textiles being my first love. I learned of The 70,273 Project from my Quilt Guild – Truckee Meadows Quilters. I’ve been quilting on and off for the last 25 years. I’ve made many quilts, tried many blocks, and left many project unfinished out of lack of importance. I’ve wanted to “quilt with a purpose” for several years now, and The 70,273 Project seemed to speak straight to my heart!

One of the most moving experiences of my life was a trip to the National Holocaust Museum in Washington, D. C. I’m honored to be a part of this amazing movement – the remembrance of those whose lives were randomly cut so short. I think of what the world truly lost and imagine if the Steven Hawkings, Helen Kellers, the FDRs and Kim Peeks of the world were taken early – where would the world be today without their gifts?

The 70,273 Project Quilt #179, detail

My Middling (18.5″ x 22″) was made and finished in April of 2017 with fabrics from my stash. In my twenties I traveled to Europe. I collected fabrics and ribbons from France and Belgium, those are included in my quilt. The backing and some ribbon are from my mother’s collection. She passed at the age of 95 in 2015, and working with her things was a sweet reminder of her and learning to sew as a youngster on her old Singer! I wanted to use some traditional techniques (flying geese) and modern advancements of dye cutting fonts to recognize individuals. 33 lives are commemorated in all – each with love and the deepest respect.  

The 70,273 Project Quilt #179, detail

I honor family and friends who suffer from physical and mental diseases and realize they, too, would have most likely received the dreaded XX. Their love and compassion, not to mention individual talents, would have been taken from us. The very thought! Education is the only remedy for such atrocities. I want everyone to remember the past so we don’t repeat this mistake made by calloused individuals. I thank you for taking on the creation, responsibility, and the monumental task of The 70,273 Project. 

Kindest regards,

Cindy

~~~~~~~

Cindy, thank your beautiful Middling and for your touching words. I can’t tell you how many time a day I think what a big empty hole would be in my life were there no Nancy. It’s unfathomable, really. I look forward to our paths crossing in person one day so I can call you Sugar to your face. xo

~~~~~~~

Would you like to make a Middling?
Would you like to make blocks?
Would you like to Piece a top or Quilt a quilt or both? Just let me know.

Weeks 60-69 (4/3 – 5/11, 2017) Recap

The 70273 Project Quilt #10 brings home some new jewelry!

Good news: the reconstruction is as finished as it’s ever going to be, so I’ve dedicated myself to getting the blocks checked-in (among other things). You might want to fix yourself something to drink, cause we’re gonna’take this week by week, and there are a lotta’ weeks to cover . . .

My maternal grandmother’s paper scissors still sail right through paper like cutting through melted butter. I don’t know if they make ’em like this any more.

Week 60: 4/3-9, 2017 Highlights

  • The Engineer prepared and filed the income tax report.
  • Elaine Fields Smith and Pam Patterson had a booth at the Stephenville Native & Heirloom Plant Fair in Texas.
  • Received blocks from:
    • Kathryn Snow (GA/USA)
    • Deborah L. J. MacKinnon (WA/USA)
    • Sandra Readler (VT/USA)
    • Rebecca Hart (MO/USA)
    • Tree Kuhalich (SC/USA)
    • Sharon Brendle (WA/USA)
    • Vickie Turner (GA/USA)

Closeup of Quilt #10

Week 61: 4/10-16, 2017 Highlights

  • A post on the French Patchwork Guild blog
  • A post by Sandi Hazelwood on The Crafty Planner Blog
  • Computer meltdown (a.k.a. major angst)
  • Donations received from:
    • Frances Alford (financial – Thank you!)
    • Susan Burch (fabric – Thank you!)
  • Blocks received from:
    • Anon
    • Margaret Williams (GA/USA)
    • AnneVisart deBocarne (Belgium)

Week 62: 4/17-23, 2017 Highlights

  • Reconstruction from computer meltdown begins
  • Block drive at Fayette Senior Services; in Fayetteville, GA on 4/21
  • Received blocks from:
    • Tricia Stearns (GA/USA)
    • Sandy Snowden (England)
    • Betty Buford (UK)
    • Nancy Glynn (GA/USA)
    • Paula Anderson (GA/USA)</li>
    • Anne Rodriguez (GA/USA)
    • Carlotta Vagaro (GA/USA)

Making blocks in the Channel Islands, UK

Week 63: 4/24-30, 2017 Highlights

  • Sent Quilt #31 off to quilter Janet Eidem
  • Sent bundles of blocks to:
    • Janine Morrell
    • Francs Alford
  • Developed and posted new guidelines for registering a quilt with The 70273 Project
  • Another block drive in the Channel Islands, UK organized and facilitated by The 70273 Project Ambassadors Kim Monins and Gisele Therezien. Even the Parish Constable & Vicar showed up to participate!
  • Pam Patterson, Jiny, and Bob: met at post office for delightful (if short) visit and hand delivered blocks, fabric, and smiles.
  • Blocks received from:
    • Margaret Williams (GA/USA)
    • Kris Phillips (WA/USA)
    • Wendy Anton (England)
    • Pam Patterson (TX/USA)
    • Cathy Watkins (CAN)
    • Susan Burch and grands (GA/USA)

Screen shot from Instagram: Cera.Bee quilts #104 of The 70273 Project.

Week 64: 5/1-7, 2017 Highlights

  • Donation received from Teddy Pruett – Thank you, Sugar!
  • Sent bundles to:
    • Frances Alford, Quilt 151
    • Janine Morrell, Quilt 135
  • Blocks received from:
    • Rosemary Wellner and A Circle of Friends (NJ/USA)
    • Maria Conway (Argentina)
    • Marina Olivari (Argentina)
    • Beth Baray (NJ/USA)
    • Bev Betz (NJ/USA)
    • Betty Bryson (NJ/USA)
    • Pat Edwards (NJ/USA)
    • Pat Fox (NJ/USA)
    • Florence Grehlinger (NJ/USA)
    • Jean Hills (NJ/USA)
    • Arlene Schnaare (NJ/USA)
    • Dutch Wests (NJ/USA)
    • Linda White (NJ/USA)
    • Sherron Davis (NJ/USA)
    • Liz Johnson (NJ/USA)
    • Ann McCay (NJ/USA)
    • Annie O’Brien (NJ/USA)
    • Sandy Renninger (NJ/USA)
    • Linda White (NJ/USA)
    • Dianna Kelly (NJ/USA)
    • Sally Clark Massinio (NJ/USA)
    • Barbara Piquet (NJ/USA)
    • Cathy Skinner (NJ/USA)
    • Jeanne Hewell-Chambers (NC,GA/USA)
    • Deirdre McConathy (KY/USA)

The 70273 Project had a presence at the Traverse City, Michigan Human Rights Awareness Night thanks to 70273 Project Ambassador Suzanne McCarthy

Week 65: 5/8-14, 2017 Highlights

  • Suzanne McCarthy had a table at the Traverse City, MI Human Rights Commission event on 5/9, and some really good things have come from it.
  • A good post by Annie Labruyere on her blog
  • Spent the week at the beach with my family, so not home to receive blocks.

Week 66: 5/15-21, 2017 Highlights

  • Identification and reconstruction of information lost in computer meltdown still continues
  • The blog theme broke, so as a stop-gap measure, I spent time rearranging things so nothing is lost or unsightly, and in the meantime, I continue to work on the site makeover as time permits.
  • Blocks received from:
  • Quilt #3 hung in the Tree City Quilt Guild show in Gainesville, Florida.
  • Blocks received from:
    • Eileen Bradshaw (FL/USA)
    • Laver Austin (FL/USA)
    • Donna Lee (IL/USA)
    • Cindy Cavallo (NV/USA)
    • Anonymous
    • Debbie Burchell (CAN)
    • Glenna Kelley (FL/USA)
    • Jody Kelley (FL/USA)
    • Alta Paul (FL/USA)
    • Carolyn Katzoff (CO/USA) Collaborative blocks!*
    • Little Luna (VA/USA)

Special delivery from Tracey Selingo

Week 67: 5/22-28, 2017 Highlights

  • Designed shipping labels
  • Reconstruction continues. Sigh.
  • A good post by Rebecca Glotfelty
  • Blocks received from:
    • Margaret Williams (GA/USA)
    • Jan Stone (USA)
    • Tracey Selingo (PA/USA)
    • Dave Harman (UK)
    • Vanessa Black (GA)
    • Idalina DaSilva (CAN)

Week 68: 5/29-6/4, 2017 Highlights

  • A good post by Wendy Reed
  • A good post by Annie Labruyere
  • Blocks received from:
    • Andrea Schupbach (Germany)
    • Becky Lawyer (IN/USA)

Kim and Steve Monins from Jersey, Channel Islands, UK

Week 69: 6/5-11, 2017 Highlights

  • A good post by Jan Stone
  • Send a bundle of blocks to Patti Baymiller to piece
  • Delivered 5 bundles of blocks to Margaret Williams to piece and quilt
  • The 70273 Project Quilt #10 won herself some new jewelry (a.k.a. a Third Place Ribbon in the Group Quilts Category) at the East Cobb Quilt Guild Show.
  • The 70273 Project Ambassador Kim Monins and her husband, Steve came across the pond and paid us a visit. One night simply wasn’t long enough, though, even if they do talk funny. Hoping for more time next year.
  • Blocks received from:
    • Jean Gelsinger (MO/USA)
    • Long Beach Modern Quilt Guild (CA/USA)
    • Norma Hanlon (MN/USA)
    • Vina Missel (MI/USA)

There were many quilt numbers handed out and several quilts received.
I’ll tell you about those in future posts.

Okay, you might want to put your beverage down now
before you read any further, cause this is Big, y’all. This is Real Big . . .

Our current block count is – are you ready?

17,735

I’m not kidding – 17,735 people have been commemorated as of Sunday, 6/11/2017.
Y’all give yourselves a great big hug.
But wait . . . there’s more.

Block #17,568 made by Little Luna

I won’t name names, but some of you more mathematically inclined
may have already picked up on the fact that the magic 25% number
is 17,568, and now I present our block #17,568 made by Little Luna.
If her name sounds familiar, it’s because you’ve already met her.

Thank you to all of you who have stitched, who continue to stitch, and who will stitch.
To those who don’t want to stitch but do want to help commemorate,
perhaps you’d like to make a financial donation
by mashing the Donate button in the sidebar.
We have a lot of quilts to get home from around the world,
and other expenses are starting to mount,
so I promise we’ll put your money to good use.

We may have hit a milestone – a sizable milestone – and there are many more
to commemorate, so I hope this motivates you to recommit to
more stitching, to more telling, to more commemorating.
And hey, remember: June is Middling Month!

~~~~~~~

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Stitch.

Quilt 10 Gets New Jewelry

Hundred of quilts on display at the East Cobb Quilt Show June 8-10, 2017

The 70273 Project™ Quilt #10 on display at the East Cobb Quilt Guild Show 2017

The 70273 Project™ Quilt #10

The 70273 Project™ Quilt #10, detail

The 70273 Project™ Quilt #10, detail

The 70273 Project™ Quilt #10 with Margaret Williams, Piecer and Quilter

Today is the first time I’ve seen Quilt #10 since she was a mere bundle of blocks held together with a red ribbon. Margaret Williams finished piecing her, then submitted her for the East Cobb Quilt Show in Marietta, GA Our Quilt #10 was juried in (big honor), and The Engineer and I dropped by on the last day to see Margaret and #10.

Do you like her new jewelry? (And yes, the quilt part of the ribbon is hand pieced!) Drum roll, please: Our quilt #10 won a ribbon for Third Place in the Group Quilt category – another big honor!  Congratulations to Margaret Williams, Piecer, Quilter, and Finisher of Quilt #10 and to those who have blocks in Quilt #10:

Ada Hewell (US)
Adalee Beasley (US)
Andy Grimaldi (US)
Andrew R. Chambers (US)
Anonymous
Barbara Atwell (US)
Bev Wiedeman (US)
Bobbi Penniman (US)
Brenda Shimshick (US)
Caroline Rudisill (US)
Carolyn Katzoff (US)
Chase Hughes (US)
David S Leader (US)
Deborah L. J. MacKinnon (US)
Debra Steinmann (US)
Denniele Bohannen (US)
Elizabeth Belcher (US)
Emily May (Milly) Grice (FR)
Faye Cook (AUS)
Frances Holliday Alford (US)
Glenda Williams (AUS)
Hylke and Marjolein Lootens
Janet Eidem (US)
Janet Hartje (US)
Janice Foy (US)
Janine Morrell (US)
Jeanne Hewell-Chambers (US)
Jennifer Eastment (AUS)
Jennifer Lario Moya (AUS)
Jennifer Shimshick (US)
Kimberly Kuhns (US)
Kitty Sorgen (US)
Laurie Dunn (US)
Lee Durbin (US)
Linda Heron (CAN)
Linda Isaacs (US)
Linda Smith (US)
Lori East (US)
Margaret Williams (US)
Marsha Hardan (US)
Maryellen “Graz” Grysewicz (US)
Michelle Banton (US)
Michelle Hughes (US)
Mildred S (Millie) Long (US)
MJ Kinman (US)
Mona Masters (US)
Pat Gaska (US)
Pauline (AUS)
Robin Welsh (US)
Rosemary Claus-Gray (US)
Sarah Noelle Ballantine (US)
Sue Beermann (US)
Susan Getchell (US)
Susan Graham (US)
Susan Guild (US)
Susan Leader (US)
Susie Wheelis (US)

 

L to R: The Engineer (a.k.a. Andy), moi, Quilt #10, Margaret Williams, Susan Williams

Bonus: Not only did we get a personalized tour of the quilt show from Margaret, but we got to meet her delightful daughter, Susan.

L to R: The Engineer, Phoebe, Susan, and Margaret (in front)

And they got to meet our elderly Corgi, Phoebe, who was along for the ride because we are headed even further away on family business. It was a good and glorious day.

Notes: In the background, I’m doing a site makeover, creating galleries for each quilt. And this week’s update/recap post might be delayed. We’ll have to see how my time goes this afternoon. I’m at Mother’s house . . . which may or may not have something to do with it.

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Other places to gather around The 70273 Project water cooler:

Shop with Amazon Smile and support The 70273 Project.

Subscribe to the blog (where all information is shared).

Join the English-speaking Facebook group – our e-campfire – where you can talk to other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Join the French-speaking Facebook group – our other e-campfire – where you can chat with other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Like the Facebook page where you can check in for frequent updates.

Get folks to help celebrate your birthday by making blocks and/or donating bucks.

Follow the pinterest board for visual information.

Post using #the70273project on Instagram. (Please tag me, too, @whollyjeanne, so I don’t miss anything.)

Tell your friends what you want for your birthday.

And if you haven’t yet made some blocks, perhaps you’d like to put some cloth in your hands and join us.

Or maybe you’d like to gather friends and family, colleagues or students, club or guild members, etc. together and make a group quilt.

Quilt 169, a Middling by Margaret Andrews

The 70273 Project Quilt 169, a Middling by Margaret Andrews. 16.5″ x 22.5″. May 2017.

The base material is the fabric that is used for soles of footed pjs. That reminds me of the security we have, but that was denied the 70,273 victims. The lace along the left border is from my bedroom curtains, and represents the security (again), and the comforts of home, for me, and for the perpetrators of the injustices committed against the victims. I also chose these materials, along with the red wool felt for the larger pairs of Xs for the textural interest, thinking of those with visual impairment. Both the columns of red Xs ending in ❌❌ outlined teardrops and the quilting represent the tears of those of us involved in The 70,273 Project, as well as tears of the family members over the loss of their loved ones.

This Middling contains 440 pairs of Xs, representing 440 lives lost in this atrocity.

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Thank you, Margaret. Your beautiful stitched commemorations are made even more beautiful by your words.

June is Middling Month in The 70273 Project. Join us?

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