The 70273 Project

with a side of Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

Tag: 70273 ambassadors

Upcoming Exhibit in Jersey, Channel Islands

A stone building with a sculpture of a man pulling a chain

From Monday, January 8, 2018 to Saturday, January 27, 2018
this building – TheJersey Heritage Museum
will be filled with quilts made by residents
of Jersey, Channel Islands, U.K.

70273 Project Ambassadors Kim Monins and  Gisele Therezien
have worked tirelessly for more than a year,
hosting block drives, piecing tops,
quilting and finishing quilts.

Gisele and her son, Ed and Kim and her husband, Steve spent all day Sunday, 1/8/2018 hanging the quilts.

and creating information centers to enhance
the experience for visitors.

Go visit if you can.
Treat yourself to what promises to be some amazingly beautiful quilts

and some gorgeous spots of Earth.

Thank you, Kim and Gisele, for all the time, energy, and expertise
you’ve invested in these commemorations
and for taking and sharing such beautiful photos.
I’ll be profiling each individual quilt in future blog posts,
so you might want to subscribe so you don’t miss a single thing.

Preparing Quilts for Durham Cathedral

quilts made of white bases covered with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables at Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

Quilts are being made to  hang in Rochester Cathedral from January 19 to March 12, 2018, and in another part of the U.K., quilts are being made to hang in Durham Cathedral from January 25 to 29, 2018.

white quilts of all sizes adorned with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables at Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

The ladies of Coxhoe quilters have been stitching and educating local students for a year, and last week they decided to take stock to see what still needs to be done, so all the quilts made locally were taken into Coxhoe Village Hall and draped from the stage and over chairs and tables. “What an amazing sight it was to see all those quilts together in one space,” writes Margaret Jackson, a U.K. Ambassador for The 70273 Project. “The expression on Chrissie Fitzgerald’s face said it all – if only I’d had a camera ready to record it!”

Margaret reports that they have most of the piecing, quilting, and finishing done now, but still have about four bundles of blocks to put together. Various members of the Coxhoe Quilters took a bundle so the quilts could be ready when it’s time to deliver the quilts to the cathedral. “Coxhoe quilters is a small group,” says Margaret, “and many of the members are relatively new to quilting, but they have pulled out all the stop to ensure Durham’s contribution to The 70273 Project is a beautiful success.”

quilts of all sizes, each with a white base adorned with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables at Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

The biggest challenge is the largest of the quilts comprised of 395 blocks and measuring 16 feet by 8 feet. It was made in nine smaller sections which have been joined into three rows of three sections each – something that will be done when the Coxhoe Quilters gather at the Village Hall on January 8. “We’re taking sandwiches,” Margaret says with a chuckle, “because it will be a BIG job.” There will no doubt be cakes, too, as Eva is very good at keeping her fellow quilters sustained.

“We are still flabbergasted by the response we have had,” says Margaret. “Everybody has been so generous. It is amazing how The 70273 Project draws in people who are committed to compassion and kindness.”

Two members of the Coxhoe Quilters deserve a special mention here: Marjorie Collins has contributed almost 200 blocks, and Julie Lovatt (Margaret’s hairdresser) has contributed over 150 blocks.

whit3e quilts embellished with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables in the Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

“Everything is going to plan,” Margaret says with confidence. “What an amazing sight it will be in the magnificent Durham Cathedral which has stood in Durham since AD 996. A fitting place to commemorate some of the 70,273 lives cut short.”

~~~~~~~

Marjorie, Julie, Chrissie, Mary, Margaret, and many other Coxhoe Quilters have commemorated many of those we honor. Please share these posts because you never know who’ll see it and want to become a part of The 70273 Project and go see the quilts at either Rochester Cathedral or Durham Cathedral – such is the magic of social media. I have over 7000 blocks waiting to be pieced and quilted. Interested? Let me know.

Endings

It’s Sunday, 05 November 2017.
Nobody applauds when the announcer declares the 2017 International Quilt Festival over.

Queen Becky gives us a lesson in how to fold the quilts,
how to roll and twist the tissue paper,
and where to place it to prevent creases when the quilts are folded.
She is an excellent teacher from whom I learn an awful lot.

The quilts and all who had a hand in creating them are treated with respect.
A clean sheet is placed between the quilts and the floor,

and everyone who touches the quilts wears clean, white gloves.

Sean and David Rusidill (Caroline’s amazingly polite and fun to be with sons), Judy Jochen,
and Shannon Timberlake join in the take down and store effort.

The Engineer (Andy) takes quilts off the walls, and
Linda Moore and Peggy Thomas (sisters) fold and box quilts as they come down.

Caroline Rudisill checks quilts off the inventory list

as they go into the boxes.

It would not have happened with out Peggy Thomas

and Tari Vickery,
both seen here in The 70273 Project Interactive Booth
where people took home 1000 block kits,
left financial donations, and made Friendship Blocks.

Peggy Thomas and Tari Vickery (The 70273 Project Ambassadors)
– what would I . . . what would The 70273 Project . . . do without them?

Mary Green, Ambassador for The 70273 Project
(seen here in front of her beautiful Middling made with beads)
worked in the Interactive Booth, as did . . .

Cindy Cavallo, Ambassador

Caroline Rudisill, Ambassador

Frances Alford, Ambassador
and folks whose photos must be on somebody else’s phone:
Elaine Smith, Ambassador
Linda Moore, Ambassador
Judy Jochen, Ambassador,
Shannon Timberlake.

Thank you all for making the effort not just to get to the Festival,
but to share your time with The 70273 Project. I am grateful beyond description.

Thank you to Queen Becky, who hung The 70273 Project quilts
in the Special Exhibit, making us look so good . . .

to Rose (she teaches special education) who helped hang quilts in the Interactive Booth . . .

to Becky who, because of health issues, wasn’t able to be at the Festival,
but for months and months before the Festival,  donned her best patience and wit
to guide me through the process,
even taking the time to call me on the phone
with the good news that The 70273 Project had been selected
as a Special Exhibit when she could’ve just sent an email.

to Deann who was on-site, always calm and patient and thorough in her answers and instructions,

to Terri, whose laugh never faded throughout the entire five days

to the people back home who assembled The Go Block Bags
(all 1000 bags were taken!) . . .

 to all y’all who weren’t there in person,
but were most definitely there in spirit – sharing posts,
telling others, sending encouraging, appreciative message, emails, and comments –

and to The Engineer . . .  Andy
the man who has unwaveringly honored
our vision and vow of togetherness
for 44 years now . . .

THANK YOU.

It definitely takes a village, and we have a village made of the  kindest,
most compassionate, smiling, big-hearted people I ever dreamed existed.


All good things must come to an end, and the International Quilt Festival is no exception.
Looking at the photos of empty walls now, I see visual foreshadowing . . .

We get home and take our elder Corgi Phoebe up the mountain on Wednesday,
cooking all her favorite foods and putting them in front of her,
sitting on the floor with her, petting her, talking to her, loving her.
She wants to go outside every 2 minutes or so as though she can’t make up her mind.
She stands over her water bowl as though it’s familiar,
but she’s forgotten what she’s supposed to do with it.

A business trip on Thursday, and on Friday, it’s time to make The Hard Decision.

As we wait on Jeff (our vet, friend, and well, extended family member),
a man comes in and walks right over to Phoebe who would ordinarily
be glad to see him because she has always known that everybody wants to pet her.
This man does want to pet her,
but today Phoebe doesn’t even raise her head
or look up at him.

We are ushered not into the usual exam room,
but into a more spacious room with colorful padded chairs.
There’s even a doggie bed . . . pink.
I know why we are here
– shoot, I’m the one who called Jeff and told him why we wanted to come –
and yet I am unable to let go of the hope,
that Jeff will enter to announce that an IV of fluids
and maybe 2 weeks of antibiotics and our Phoebe will be good as new.

That’s not what happens.

I sit on the floor with Phoebe.
She stands near the door,
and I ask her to move
for fear someone will smack her hard
when they don’t see her standing there.

She makes laps around the room,
walking in circles that take her
in front of the examining table,
in front of Andy,
in front of me,
then back by the examining table.
Around and around and around she goes.
Mindlessly.
Endlessly.

Jeff takes her out to put the catheter in,
and when he brings her back,
she’s content to lay on the bed she’s been avoiding.

We all sit on the floor now.
As Jeff administers the sedative/anti-anxiety drug,
I tell stories that start with “Remember when . . . “.

As Jeff administers the narcotic,
we each lay a hand on Phoebe
and send steady streams of love to her
through our touch.

The precious four-legged soul called Phoebe
who gifted us with her presence
breathes her last breath
to the sound of laughter and love.

From the high of the Special Exhibit at IQF
to the lows of witnessing the life of a member of our family come to a close,
life is a roller coaster, and we have been in the front seat.

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