The 70273 Project

with a side of Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

Category: 70273 (page 1 of 20)

Preparing Quilts for Durham Cathedral

quilts made of white bases covered with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables at Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

Quilts are being made to  hang in Rochester Cathedral from January 19 to March 12, 2018, and in another part of the U.K., quilts are being made to hang in Durham Cathedral from January 25 to 29, 2018.

white quilts of all sizes adorned with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables at Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

The ladies of Coxhoe quilters have been stitching and educating local students for a year, and last week they decided to take stock to see what still needs to be done, so all the quilts made locally were taken into Coxhoe Village Hall and draped from the stage and over chairs and tables. “What an amazing sight it was to see all those quilts together in one space,” writes Margaret Jackson, a U.K. Ambassador for The 70273 Project. “The expression on Chrissie Fitzgerald’s face said it all – if only I’d had a camera ready to record it!”

Margaret reports that they have most of the piecing, quilting, and finishing done now, but still have about four bundles of blocks to put together. Various members of the Coxhoe Quilters took a bundle so the quilts could be ready when it’s time to deliver the quilts to the cathedral. “Coxhoe quilters is a small group,” says Margaret, “and many of the members are relatively new to quilting, but they have pulled out all the stop to ensure Durham’s contribution to The 70273 Project is a beautiful success.”

quilts of all sizes, each with a white base adorned with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables at Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

The biggest challenge is the largest of the quilts comprised of 395 blocks and measuring 16 feet by 8 feet. It was made in nine smaller sections which have been joined into three rows of three sections each – something that will be done when the Coxhoe Quilters gather at the Village Hall on January 8. “We’re taking sandwiches,” Margaret says with a chuckle, “because it will be a BIG job.” There will no doubt be cakes, too, as Eva is very good at keeping her fellow quilters sustained.

“We are still flabbergasted by the response we have had,” says Margaret. “Everybody has been so generous. It is amazing how The 70273 Project draws in people who are committed to compassion and kindness.”

Two members of the Coxhoe Quilters deserve a special mention here: Marjorie Collins has contributed almost 200 blocks, and Julie Lovatt (Margaret’s hairdresser) has contributed over 150 blocks.

whit3e quilts embellished with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables in the Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

“Everything is going to plan,” Margaret says with confidence. “What an amazing sight it will be in the magnificent Durham Cathedral which has stood in Durham since AD 996. A fitting place to commemorate some of the 70,273 lives cut short.”

~~~~~~~

Marjorie, Julie, Chrissie, Mary, Margaret, and many other Coxhoe Quilters have commemorated many of those we honor. Please share these posts because you never know who’ll see it and want to become a part of The 70273 Project and go see the quilts at either Rochester Cathedral or Durham Cathedral – such is the magic of social media. I have over 7000 blocks waiting to be pieced and quilted. Interested? Let me know.

Postcard from Across the Pond

Writes The 70273 Project Ambassador, Lucy Horner . . .

We will be filling the Nave of Rochester Cathedral with XX from Friday 19th January to Monday 12th of March.  Many thanks to Rochester Cathedral’s management committee for extending the time period to give more people chance to see it, and for extending the scope of the display area so that we can commemorate even more people.

On Wednesday 24th January, we will be gathering to remember, celebrate, thank, and raise a glass … more details to follow!

 Thank you to Grosvenor Shows for hosting us at the Autumn Quilt Show at Detling, and thank you to all of you who came, and sat and stitched our Middlings and commemorated more lives.
Edina and The A Team Facilitate a Block Drive for The 70273 Project in the UK

It’s so good to see Edina, back on her pins, and firing on all cylinders again with her A Team of helpers after breaking her foot a few months back.  This Project runs on Love, and everyone who helps with it makes sacrifices … whether it is their time, aching fingers … (or brains) … family time … ‘me’ time … or dipping into their coffers, but Edina really has given so much to The 70273 Project.  There’s no way that our South East contribution would be where it is without her. Thank you Edina! XX

a collage of people in the UK making blocks for The 70273 Project
More quilts and blocks being made in the U.K.
an assortment of people making blocks in the U.K.

Thanks to Francis Iles Galleries in Rochester, we will be swelling the coffers of The 70273 Project as they raise funds with their Art on a Postcard Sale.  Their Gallery Artists have donated original works that will be sold on the night of Thursday 30th of November from 6pm for £25 each, and proceeds will be split between The 70273 Project and The Cinnamon Trust.

The donation of people’s time in making blocks and commemorations is invaluable, but we also have a number of wonderful people to thank who have given us donations towards materials.  They are

Medway Council who have given us a £250 grant, Rob Flood – whose company ‘Feet on the Ground’ generously provided £200 for materials for the altar banners, Bev Bunn who donated money from her lemon-sherbert-loving Dad Vic’s funeral donations, Christine Tedman and Roy Clarke THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH … the cost of materials for the South East 70273 Project is running towards £1,000 so all donations are very much appreciated.

students at Waldegrave School in the U.K. make blocks for The 70273 Project
Nicole Davis, Head of Design & Technology, Fashion & Textiles at the Waldegrave School in the U.K., looks at the quilts and blocks made for The 70273 Project by students
Students at the Waldegrave School in the United Kingdom make blocks for The 70273 Project
Wearing the blue sweaters of their school uniform, students of the Walgrave School in the United Kingdom use needle and thread to stitch red fabric in the shape of two red X's to a base of white fabric
More Waldegrave students make blocks for The 70273 Project

And talking of heroes … we met Nicole Davies at The Great British Sewing Bee Live a few months back and she pledged to get her students at Waldegrave School, (where she is Head of Design & Technology, Fashion & Textiles) to make some blocks.   Being an absolute super star, she’s been as good as her word, and has made 5 quilts!!  Thank you to Nicole, and the pupils, staff and parents who have helped in this massive achievement. XX

Teenage students of the Waldegrave School in the United Kingdom smile as they use red fabric to make pairs of red X's that are then stitched on a white base to become blocks for The 70273 Project
A female teenager wearing a blue sweater sits beside a female teenage student stitching pairs of red X's onto white bases to commemorate some of the 70273 disabled people who were murdered by Nazis
A female student of the Waldegrave School stitches two red X's on a white base to make a block for The 70273 Project
A female wearing glasses and a black sweater sews two red X's onto a white base to make a block for The 70273 Project
A huge bouquet of gratitude to Lucy for these photos and all the time and energy she’s poured into The 70273 Project, to Edina, Wendy, Nicole, Veronica, Waldegrave students, Frances Iles Gallery, Medway Council, Rob Flood, Bev Bunn, Christine Tedman, Roy Clarke, Siobhan, Sharon, and so many others who I will hopefully get to meet and thank in person when I’m there in January.
~~~~~~~
I’ve been wearing my Idea Hat which  means there will be many new things happening in The 70273 Project next year. To make sure you don’t miss anything that’s happening around the world:
subscribe to the blog
subscribe to The 70273 Project XXtra Newsletter
join The 70273 Project Campfire (English facebook group)
join Le Projet 70273 (French facebook group)
like The 70273 Project facebook page

It’s Time for Another Block Update

Photo Description: A big log sits stalled at the top of the waterfall, covered with 15″ or so of now.

Thanks to the 13-15 inches of snow that covers the ground here, for the first time in I don’t know how long, i have checked in all the blocks in my possession. That will, of course, change when we can get out and go back to the post office in 3-4 more days, but for now, today I checked in blocks from these lovely people:

BLOCKS RECEIVED
Ann Hewitt (UK)
Margaret Jackson (UK)
Mindy Masters (TX, US)
Pamela Jeffries (, SC, US)
Julie Young (TX, US)
Anonymous
Trist Seiner (TX, US)
Diana Lewis (AR, US)
Carol Biller (OH, US)
Jan Burke (PA, US)
Sandee Reynebeau (CO, US)
Connie Harrison (TX, US)
Lori Brewer (OH, US)
Laurie Wilcox (CA, US)
Barbara Kielaszek (TX, US)
Lisa Taglia (MN, US)
Judy Brinker (MO, US)
Linda Nichols (NC, US)
Deborah Sheridan (TX, US)
Heather Harbour-Bedsaul (NC, US)
Rose Marie Yates (TX, US)
Jean Mehaffey (FL, US)
Karen Adams (CA, US)
Debbie Gard (CA, US)
Kathy McCarthy (CA, US)
Cathy Hall (CA, US)
Judy Clifford (CA, US)
Mary Rapaz (CA, US)
Beth Davidson (Ca, US)
Cecily Zerega (CT, US)
Libby Williamson (CA, US)
Karen Fahel (TX, US)
Debbie Metti (OH, US)
Sharon K. Morton (OH, US)
Rebekah Delafield (TX, US)
Elaine Smith (TX, US)
Elizabeth Ferry Perkins (TX, US)
Caroline Rudisill (TX, US)
David Rudisill and Sean Rudisill (TX, US)
Wendy Tuma (MN, US)
Connie Albin (MN, US)
Emma Brinker (MN, US)
Ruth Brinker (MN, US)
Barbara J. Drentlaw (MN, US)
Amanda Roberts (MN, US)
Lydia Tilstra (Mn, US)

QUILT TOPS
Quilt tops 252 and 254, Pieced by Edna Jamandre (Anybody ready to quilt?)

QUILTS
Quilt 206, Pieced and Finished by Wendy Tuma; Quilted by Connie Albin of Turnberry Lane Quilting
Quilt 214, a block quilt Pieced by Patti Lapinsky, Quilted by Beth Schmidt, Finished by Marge Cree
Quilt 279, a Middling made by Roberta A. Pabst (CA, US)
Quilt 280, a Long Skinny made by Roberta A. Pabst (CA, US)
Quilt 282, a Middling made by Beth Schmidt
Quilt 369, a Middling made by Members of the Orlando Modern Quilt Guild (FL, US)
Quilt 370, a Middling made by Sarah Lauzon

Block count at the beginning of this post: 29,728
Block count at the end of this post: 32,239

# of blocks checked in today? 2500
How long did it take me? 7 hours
Am I complaining? Not one little bit.

To those who are mentioned in this post, thank you.
To those who continue to commemorate, thank you.
To those who will raise your hand and offer to piece and quilt, thank you.
To those who make financial donations, thank you.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

Middlings Being Made at Marbridge

Lynn Woll is a woman who does what she says she’s gonna’ do. I meet Lynn at The 70273 Project Special Exhibit at the International Quilt Festival in Houston, Texas last month. She asks if she can interview me for Create Whimsy, her beautiful blog, and she does. She tells me she is going to make quilts with her sister and friends at Marbridge, and she does.

On December 2, 2017, Lynn takes fabric and other supplies to Marbridge where 12 people make 12 Middlings.

Photo Description: A man wearing a red sweater and a big smile adds fabric in the shape of pairs of red X’s to a base of white fabric.

 

Photo Description: A woman wearing a green t-shirt weaves strips of red fabric to make a pair of red X’s on a base of white fabric.

 

Photo Description: A man wearing a white t-shirt and a big smile cuts and arranges red ribbon in the shape of pairs of X’s to a base of white fabric.

 

Photo Description: Janet, Lynn’s sister wears a big smile, a Christmas headband, and a long-sleeved t-shirt with the word “Texas” on it as she arranges red fabric as pairs of red X’s to a base of white fabric.

Writes Lynn after the quilt-making afternoon:

“I had 12 residents participate and made 12 Middlings. We had so much fun today, and I love sharing your story with the residents of Marbridge. I explained about WWII and the Nazis and how they didn’t like people who were different from them and that 70273 people who doctors said were different were murdered, and we were honoring those people. The resident got it – a few even said, ‘People like me?'”

Thank you Lynn, Janet, and friends at Marbridge. I can’t wait to hear more stories and see your finished quilts.

Audio of Jeanne reading this blog post
~~~~~~~
I’m starting a monthly newsletter – The 70273 Project XXtra –  that will be filled with bits of information you might be interested in and might not see anywhere else. Maybe you want to subscribe?

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

Let’s Update the Block Count Why Don’t We

Before we talk numbers, this: beginning in December 2017, I’ll be sending out The 70273 Project XXtra  – a newsletter that will come out once a month filled with bits and pieces about The 70273 Project that you won’t see here on the blog, To subscribe, click right here. And hey, thanks for the name, Fiona Egan, Suzanne McCarthy, and Nancy Carroll.

Now about that block count update. I hope you’re sitting down . . .

Blocks:
Lisa Franzman (US)
patsy monk (US)
Janet Cates (US)
Elisabeth Miller (Germany)
Deb Bear (US)
Diana Vandeyar (Australia)
Kathy Odell (US)
Sharon Henry (US)
Anonymous
M. V. Wendell (US)
Nan Ryan (US)
Madeline Hughes (US)
Rosary Lomonaco (US)
Carol Oglesby (US)
Margaret Creek (UK)
Lori-Lyn Dunn (US)
Sandra Walker (Canada)
Rachel Williams (US)
Eve Trester-wilson (US)
Anita Barsalou (US)
Allison Ramboth (US)
Lindsay Norlen (US)
Lucy Poloniecka (UK)
Eileen DiPietro (US)
Patricia McNeely (US)
Jayne Elton (UK)
Sally Lindsay & Children & Grandchildren (US)
Janet Eidem (US)
Jeanie Crosthwait (US)
Maggie McCain (US)
Norie Mohs (US)
Jocelyne Feuguet (France)
Cabral Patchwork France
Club De La MJC de Claix (France)
Edna Jamandre (US)
Martine Molet-Bastien (France)
Patricia Barthelemy (France)
Association Filament (France)
Patch Patcha Ol’Hossegar (France)
Antoinette Kuborn (Belgium)
Claudine Oger (Belgium)
Brigitte Martin (Belgium)
Carmen Gayo (Belgium)
Nadia Van Comp (Belgium)
Agnes Camplon (Belgium)
Agnes Thys (Belgium)
Michelle Bellin (Belgium)
Club Patchwork Atelier Recreation Plan D’Orgon (France)
Vero Patch (Belgium)
Nicole Malcotti (France)
Nancy Bass (US)
Robin C. Perry (US)
Abbie Metti (US)
Debbie Burchell (Canada)
Sandy Dadck (US)
Liz Dougherty (US)
Theresa Elerman (US)
Dayna Harris (US)
Sacred Heart High School (Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK)
Sharleen Jespersen (US)
Beth Schmidt (US)
Dale Lauzon (US)
Sarah Lauzon (US)

# of Global Block Day / Blockapalooza blocks received: 3286 (included in blocks noted above)

Quilts (Future blog posts on each individual quilt will give more info and photos.)
#80 (France)

#81 from Chantal Baquin (France)

#130 from Chantal Baquin (France)

#131 (France)

#199, a Middling by Nan Ryan (US)

#235, a Middling made by Susan Long (US)

#248, a Long Skinny made by Love Sullivan with a block by Rosary Lomonaco

#281 (France)

# 306 with blocks made by Sarah Brookes, Kay Mills, Kay Coolbear, Marion Mackay, Judy Belgrave, Irene Miller, Sarah Russell, Susan Wright, Sigi Scrase, Ann Pibal, Elizabeth Niven, Alison Jones, Anne Groufsky, Errolyn Thane and Quilting Students, Anna Hicks, Fleur Morris and Stitch Sisters, Diane Harries, Anonymous, and Philippa Doyle (New Zealand)

#307 with blocks made by Philippa Doyle and Marilyn Daly (New Zealand)

#308 with blocks made by Susan Brookes, Trish Souness, Beth French, Viv Heiman, Rose Keen, Kay Mills, Kay Coolbear, Maria Cross, Pamela Lindon, Angela Tanzania, Adrienne Howard, Jacquelyn Bailey, Fyvie Murray, Vivienne Rathbone, Vera Sullivan, Carolyn Diamond, Sheryl Anicich, Catherine Watson, Debra DeLorenzo, Jill Nickel, Janet Wingrove, Beverly Featherstone, Jane Campbell, Anonymous (New Zealand)

#309 with blocks made by Marilyn Daly, Grace Wardell, Jill Bowman, Alison Elliot, Jude Ferguson, Anonymous, Claire Hodgson, Karen Simcox, Helen Hindmarsh, Sue Stephen, Christine Singleton, Pat Watkins, Celia Connor, Judy Johnson, Riet van Koeverden, Jocelyn Thornton (New Zealand)

#310, a Middling made by Bev Haring (US)

#311, a Mini made by Lori-Lyn Dunn (US)

#312, a Mini made by Lori-Lyn Dunn (US)

#313, a Mini made by Lori-Lyn Dunn (US)

#314, a Mini made by Lori-Lyn Dunn (US)

#315, a Mini made by Susan Grancio (US)

#316, a Mini made by Susan Grancio (US)

#317, a Mini made by Susan Grancio (US)

#318, a Mini made by Susan Grancio (US)

#319, a Middling made by Francoise N. Guyen (France)

#320, a Middling made by Francoise N. Guyen (France)

#323 made by Nicole Malcotti (France)

#324 made by members of Patchwork Surson (France)

#325 made by Delegation De France Patchwork D’Ille et Vilaine (France)

#326 made by Association Patchwork Apical Laüpere (France)

#331 made by members of Patchwork D’Issy Les Moulineaux et Vanves (France)

#332 made by members of St. Cast Le Guildo Côtes-D’Amour (France)

#333 made by members of Association Monisle en Patch (France)

#338, a Middling made by Debra Steinmann (US)

~~~~~~~

# blocks checked in on November 13, 14, 15, and 16 (Week 92): 4076
# quilts: 337 (I sure do need Piecers and Quilters)

Block count as of the beginning of this post: 25,652
Block count as of the end of this post: 29,728 

My heart explodes with gratitude to all who are . . .
~ making and sending blocks, finished quilts, Middlings, and Minis
~ hosting block drives in their communities, churches, libraries, and schools.
~  offering to Piece and Quilt
~ sending financial donations
~ volunteered at the recent International Quilt Festival
~ telling me their stories
~ stepping up to take on major responsibilities (I’m thinking of you, Peggy Thomas and Tari Vickery)
~ writing about The 70273 Project in social media
~ interviewing me for their blog
~ sharing The 70273 Project with quilt guilds and friends and other groups
~ keeping the spirit of The 70273 Project alive and well by being kind.

Y’all are The Best. Please don’t stop spreading the word and commemorating because enveloped in the commemorating we celebrate and champion those with disabilities who live today and move us closer and closer to a world where we talk not of abilities but simply of people.

~~~~~~~

Subscribe to the monthly newsletter The 70273 Project XXtra

Subscribe to receive blog posts

Join the Facebook group

Join the French Facebook group

Like The 70273 Project Facebook page

SaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

Spending Thanksgiving with Nancy

My vision of a daily diary quickly
disappeared in an unceremonial poof
as the days grew long and full. Here are the highlights  . . .
Animals are usually quite leery of Nancy,
scurrying to unimaginably small hiding places.
I was very proud of Mother’s cats
who didn’t run from Nancy,
but got up close with their curiosity.

Our daughter’s cats were not . . . well, they behaved
like cats usually behave around Nancy.

Our 1.5 year old grandson Calder Ray
(Handfull, I call him. I’ll explain later – it’s not what you think)
simply accepted Nancy as she is without  curiosity or question.
Here we see him plopping himself down
in front of her in the restaurant’s waiting area,
talking to her about getting comfortable
by taking his shoes off.
Nancy talks a lot about shoes – her shoes.

We made it to North Carolina  around 2 in the morning
(way past Nancy’s bedtime),
and that could be why she didn’t understand
that I wanted her to
sit on the toilet not the bathtub.
She wasn’t hurt,
and I did manage to grab both of her arms,
breaking her fall
so she didn’t hit her head.
But goodness, what a way to
kick off Thanksgiving week.

Nancy, who loves her bling and doesn’t usually
share her necklaces with anybody,
seemed quite willing to let Handfull
explore his feminine side with her new necklaces.

We interrupt this blog post to share a shameless adoring Grandmother
(I think I want him to call me Sugar) moment.

We take Nancy with us (almost) everywhere – to see Santa,
to the Christmas Tree
Lighting at the Village Green,
to breakfast in Highlands.
(But not to the grocery store because
her mobility is such an issue,
and she is unable to operate
a motorized cart,
and not to Asheville on Wednesday
because it was a long day
filled with much movement.
She spent the day with our friend Debbie
where she could enjoy some quiet time.)

Handful spent a lot of his exploding
vocabulary on Nancy last week,
showing her the waterfall outside the door,
then climbing up to chat
with her about this and that.

Nancy wasn’t interested in putting puzzles together
or drawing – perhaps because
of the constant commotion – but she seemed
to have a big time, as my Daddy would say, anyway.

On the drive down the mountain from
North Carolina to Georgia Saturday night,
Nancy made a Real Big Mess in the backseat,
something she found quite funny,
even 24 hours later.
Perhaps it’s because it’s unexpected
or maybe it’s because she does it so seldom,
whatever the reason,
when Nancy laughs, everybody around her laughs.

After picking her up eight days ago, we deliver Nancy
back to her home in Florida yesterday,
and after a 72-hour nap,
we’ll begin making plans for Christmas.

~~~~~~~

Were we living in Germany in 1940,
Nancy most certainly would’ve received two red X’s,
been called a “useless eater”,
and declared “unworthy of life”.
What a drab world it would be without Nancy,
Brad, Robby, Rachel, Kevin
and my other friends with disabilities in it,
and that’s one reason I’ll be making
more blocks, quilts, Middlings, and Minis for The 70273 Project.
Join me?

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

It’s Giving Tuesday & We Need Your Help

You’ve made blocks, pieced tops, quilted quilts. You continue to commemorate, and I am so deeply grateful to you for sharing your time, talent, energy, and materials to help commemorate the 70,273 people who were murdered. Perhaps you’ll be willing to help another way? Expenses for The 70273 Project have become too great for Andy and me to shoulder alone, so I’m hoping you’ll be willing to share this post and/or the Facebook fundraiser on your timeline and encourage your friends – especially those who profess to be non-stitchers but want to join in –  to contribute.

There are many expenses, and right now, our most pressing needs are shipping and storage.

The quilts of The 70273 Project have stories to tell –  stories of what unimaginable atrocities can occur when bullies are left unchecked. They also tell stories of inherited cloth used to make blocks; stories of lives touched by special needs students who taught their teachers so much; stories of loved ones with disabilities who bring such joy to the lives they touch; stories of people using a needle and thread for the very first time. The 70273 Project tells stories of people who are different contributing to a project that’s big enough to provide space for those differences in its unity of purpose. We are proving it can be done – that people who speak different languages; enjoy different likes and dislikes; have differing abilities can come together to commemorate those who died, celebrate and champion those who live, and educate all who will listen. In a time when the world needs kindness and compassion more than ever, we need money to ship the quilts around the world to tell their stories.

a few of the quilts – and that blue you see? don’t panic. it’s just the border of a pillowcase used to protect the quilts.

And we need space to store the growing collection of The 70273 Project quilts. When all is said and done, The Engineer figures we’ll have around 1200 quilts, and I have a teeny tiny little ole’ studio. I have a vision of one of those dry cleaning conveyor racks – you know, the kind that you push a button and the clothes (in this case, the quilts) move around the track till you locate the one you’re looking for –  as a way to store and retrieve the quilts. We need money to purchase the equipment and create a space to house it.

Tuesday, 11/28/2017 is #givingtuesday, and if you’re on Facebook – or you know folks who are – there are special opportunities that apply just for this one day allowing you to double the donations through matching funds.

Here’s some background info you might be interested in:
~ The 70273 Project, Inc. is recognized by the US government as a 501(c)(3) organization and is registered with Facebook as a non-profit.
~ On Giving Tuesday, 11/28/17, donations to nonprofits made through Facebook’s charitable giving tools will be matched up to $50,000 per nonprofit or $1,000 per fundraiser or donate button, until the $2 million in matching funds run out.
~ The matching begins at 8AM EST (5AM PST).
~ On Giving Tuesday, from 12 a.m. to 11:59 p.m., Facebook will forego the 5% fee it usually takes from donations made on Facebook, which means that 100% of all donations made through Facebook go to The 70273 Project.
~ You’ll see a banner on your fundraiser page after #GivingTuesday indicating the amount received in matched funds through your fundraiser.

Here’s how to set up a Facebook fundraiser on your timeline:
1. Visit  The 70273 Project Facebook Page.
2. At the bottom of the left sidebar, select “Fundraisers.”
3. Select the “+ Raise Money” button to the right of the word “Fundraisers.”
4. A pop-up box called “Create a Fundraiser” appears. Select “Get Started” at the bottom.
5. On the “Let’s Start With the Basics” page, make sure that “The 70273 Project, Inc.” is listed as who you’re raising money for.
6. Set the amount you wish to raise. (Note: Up to $1,000.00 USD will be matched.)
7. Assign an end date for your fundraiser. (Note: Only donations made on #GivingTuesday, 11/28/17 will be matched, and the matching continues until the $2 million allocated by the Gates Foundation has been depleted, so perhaps you’ll encourage your friends to donate early?)
8. Click “next”.
9. Title your fundraiser and tell why this matters to you.
10. Select “next.”
11. Choose a cover photo.
12. Select “create” and you’re off and running!

Peggy Thomas, Chief of Connections for The 70273 Project and creator of The 70273 Project Quilt #139 shown above,
created a fundraiser on her timeline. You’ll see it when you complete step 2. Feel free to use it as a template and make adjustments as desired.

Aaannnnddddd . . . if you don’t want to create a fundraiser for your Facebook timeline, you can tell your friends to simply visit The 70273 Project page, mash the “Donate” button, and contribute there.

Thank you for your continued support of The 70273 Project. I’ve got so much to tell y’all. There’s so much happening with The 70273 Project around the world – just wait till you hear. Tomorrow: Nancy and the rest of her Thanksgiving holiday then there are some new things coming up you’ll want to know about.

~~~~~~~

Other places to gather around The 70273 Project water cooler:

Shop with Amazon Smile and support The 70273 Project.

Subscribe to the blog (where all information is shared).

Join the English-speaking Facebook group – our e-campfire – where you can talk to other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Join the French-speaking Facebook group – our other e-campfire – where you can chat with other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Like the Facebook page where you can check in for frequent updates.

Follow the pinterest board for visual information.

Post using #the70273project on Instagram. (Please tag me, too, @whollyjeanne, so I don’t miss anything.)

And if you haven’t yet made some blocks, perhaps you’d like to put some cloth in your hands and join us.

Or maybe you’d like to gather friends and family, colleagues or students, club or guild members, etc. together and make a group quilt.

Or a Middling (art quilt) or a Mini (fabric postcard).

SaveSaveSaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSave

Endings

It’s Sunday, 05 November 2017.
Nobody applauds when the announcer declares the 2017 International Quilt Festival over.

Queen Becky gives us a lesson in how to fold the quilts,
how to roll and twist the tissue paper,
and where to place it to prevent creases when the quilts are folded.
She is an excellent teacher from whom I learn an awful lot.

The quilts and all who had a hand in creating them are treated with respect.
A clean sheet is placed between the quilts and the floor,

and everyone who touches the quilts wears clean, white gloves.

Sean and David Rusidill (Caroline’s amazingly polite and fun to be with sons), Judy Jochen,
and Shannon Timberlake join in the take down and store effort.

The Engineer (Andy) takes quilts off the walls, and
Linda Moore and Peggy Thomas (sisters) fold and box quilts as they come down.

Caroline Rudisill checks quilts off the inventory list

as they go into the boxes.

It would not have happened with out Peggy Thomas

and Tari Vickery,
both seen here in The 70273 Project Interactive Booth
where people took home 1000 block kits,
left financial donations, and made Friendship Blocks.

Peggy Thomas and Tari Vickery (The 70273 Project Ambassadors)
– what would I . . . what would The 70273 Project . . . do without them?

Mary Green, Ambassador for The 70273 Project
(seen here in front of her beautiful Middling made with beads)
worked in the Interactive Booth, as did . . .

Cindy Cavallo, Ambassador

Caroline Rudisill, Ambassador

Frances Alford, Ambassador
and folks whose photos must be on somebody else’s phone:
Elaine Smith, Ambassador
Linda Moore, Ambassador
Judy Jochen, Ambassador,
Shannon Timberlake.

Thank you all for making the effort not just to get to the Festival,
but to share your time with The 70273 Project. I am grateful beyond description.

Thank you to Queen Becky, who hung The 70273 Project quilts
in the Special Exhibit, making us look so good . . .

to Rose (she teaches special education) who helped hang quilts in the Interactive Booth . . .

to Becky who, because of health issues, wasn’t able to be at the Festival,
but for months and months before the Festival,  donned her best patience and wit
to guide me through the process,
even taking the time to call me on the phone
with the good news that The 70273 Project had been selected
as a Special Exhibit when she could’ve just sent an email.

to Deann who was on-site, always calm and patient and thorough in her answers and instructions,

to Terri, whose laugh never faded throughout the entire five days

to the people back home who assembled The Go Block Bags
(all 1000 bags were taken!) . . .

 to all y’all who weren’t there in person,
but were most definitely there in spirit – sharing posts,
telling others, sending encouraging, appreciative message, emails, and comments –

and to The Engineer . . .  Andy
the man who has unwaveringly honored
our vision and vow of togetherness
for 44 years now . . .

THANK YOU.

It definitely takes a village, and we have a village made of the  kindest,
most compassionate, smiling, big-hearted people I ever dreamed existed.


All good things must come to an end, and the International Quilt Festival is no exception.
Looking at the photos of empty walls now, I see visual foreshadowing . . .

We get home and take our elder Corgi Phoebe up the mountain on Wednesday,
cooking all her favorite foods and putting them in front of her,
sitting on the floor with her, petting her, talking to her, loving her.
She wants to go outside every 2 minutes or so as though she can’t make up her mind.
She stands over her water bowl as though it’s familiar,
but she’s forgotten what she’s supposed to do with it.

A business trip on Thursday, and on Friday, it’s time to make The Hard Decision.

As we wait on Jeff (our vet, friend, and well, extended family member),
a man comes in and walks right over to Phoebe who would ordinarily
be glad to see him because she has always known that everybody wants to pet her.
This man does want to pet her,
but today Phoebe doesn’t even raise her head
or look up at him.

We are ushered not into the usual exam room,
but into a more spacious room with colorful padded chairs.
There’s even a doggie bed . . . pink.
I know why we are here
– shoot, I’m the one who called Jeff and told him why we wanted to come –
and yet I am unable to let go of the hope,
that Jeff will enter to announce that an IV of fluids
and maybe 2 weeks of antibiotics and our Phoebe will be good as new.

That’s not what happens.

I sit on the floor with Phoebe.
She stands near the door,
and I ask her to move
for fear someone will smack her hard
when they don’t see her standing there.

She makes laps around the room,
walking in circles that take her
in front of the examining table,
in front of Andy,
in front of me,
then back by the examining table.
Around and around and around she goes.
Mindlessly.
Endlessly.

Jeff takes her out to put the catheter in,
and when he brings her back,
she’s content to lay on the bed she’s been avoiding.

We all sit on the floor now.
As Jeff administers the sedative/anti-anxiety drug,
I tell stories that start with “Remember when . . . “.

As Jeff administers the narcotic,
we each lay a hand on Phoebe
and send steady streams of love to her
through our touch.

The precious four-legged soul called Phoebe
who gifted us with her presence
breathes her last breath
to the sound of laughter and love.

From the high of the Special Exhibit at IQF
to the lows of witnessing the life of a member of our family come to a close,
life is a roller coaster, and we have been in the front seat.

Diary of a Week with Nancy: Day One

Saturday, 17 Nov 17
Fayetteville, GA
3:30 a.m.

The alarm clock goes off. The Engineer and I dress and make our way to the Atlanta airport. We are flying to Florida to fetch Nancy today and bring her home for Thanksgiving.

9:00 a.m.
Arriving at Nancy’s house, I ask her for a hug and get a two-armed hug instead of the usual lean-in-my-direction with her upper body. She’s ready to “go home for Thanksgiving.”

10:15 a.m.
Andy drops Nancy and me off curbside while he goes to return the car. As I toss the carry-on over my shoulder (I make it sound so light and easy!), freeing up one hand to roll the checked-bag while the other hand holds onto Nancy, Wayne Friday, a Southwest Sky Cap, leaves his station and walks over to the curb. He takes the suitcase then tells Nancy and me for us to stay where we are while he goes to get a wheelchair “’cause I can tell you need one.” He is gone several minutes, then returns smiling with a wheelchair in hand. As I struggle to get Nancy seated  in the wheelchair as expeditiously as possible so as not to hold Wayne or any other customers up, Wayne assures me he will wait as long as possible. He is calm, kind, and patient. I want him on my Committee of Jeanne.

He checks the three of us in, then pushes the wheelchair inside the terminal and down I don’t know how far to the elevator he says Andy will surely be taking. “This way,” he tells me, “you can see him right when he gets off the elevator and you won’t have so far to walk.”

“You can’t leave yet,” I tell him, “because I have absolutely no money for a tip, and if anybody ever deserved a tip, it’s you, Wayne Friday.” He chuckles and says, “Just keep flying Southwest. That’s more than enough.” When Andy gets off the elevator, just as Wayne promised he would, we walk back to Wayne so I can leave $10.00 in his hand. It’s not nearly enough, but all the cash we have. That with the letter I intend to write will have to do.

11:05 a.m.
We arrive at gate 120 and position Nancy’s wheelchair just behind the sign that says “Preboard Area.” Twenty minutes later, two women come – one pushing her wheelchair, the other walking hers – and get in line behind Nancy, but only for a few minutes, preferring to sit directly in front of the gate agent’s desk instead. He tells them that while they don’t have to go back to the Preboard Area, they will need to move because there’s a plane landing in a few minutes and people will need to go right through where they are sitting. Perhaps fearing they’ll be forgotten, they don’t budge.

11:35 a.m.
I take Nancy to the bathroom where women don’t wait for me to ask for help. They simply see what I need, and they do it, all the while offering me reassuring words as I apologize for inconveniencing them. I didn’t know until we had everything off that Nancy wears two pairs of disposable underwear, and I only brought one. There’s nothing to do but go back, fetch another pair, then find our way back to the bathroom.

On our second trip to the restroom, a plane has arrived, so there’s a line. The woman in front of me holds the hand of her young daughter, and when it’s finally her turn, it’s the handicap stall that becomes available. “You go ahead,” she tells me with a smile as she steps aside to let me pass.

Now our first trip was to the handicap stall at the far end of the bathroom where there is a sink and room for the wheelchair and my mother’s family. This stall is mere steps away. It is much smaller, and when I finally manage to get me, Nancy, and the wheelchair inside, I am sitting on the toilet with my feet on the arms of the wheelchair, the feet of the wheelchair touching the toilet, and not nearly enough room to close the door. Though it disrupts the flow of things, I open the stall door, stand Nancy up, then push the wheelchair out. I catch the eye of a woman and ask if she’ll roll the chair over to the little cubby I spy. It’s a small bathroom, and to leave the wheelchair just outside the door would mean nobody could enter or leave the entire bathroom. “Of course,” she says with a smile, and when I open the door to leave, I’m greeted by the same smiling face. “I thought you might need help again, so I waited on you,” she tells me. I resist the urge to  kiss her.

On the way back to the gate area, we twice navigate our way past a woman who is leaning on her baby’s stroller, texting while she walks in leisurely, mindless circles, oblivious to the presence of anybody else. Three men stand in the middle of the aisle – also texting – their carry-on luggage on the floor beside them. For a moment, I wish the wheelchair came with a “wide load” sign, flashing lights, and maybe even the back-up beep of a golf cart. We must get past them to get back to Andy. I scout out options for other routes, there are none. In response to my, “Excuse me, please,” one grumbles, one signs audibly, and the other does nothing.

1:00 p.m.
I find the spot for my boarding assignment A55, leaving Andy (who has a higher boarding assignment in the C group) to board with Nancy. Eric, the gate agent, motions for them to board first because we were the first ones in line to Preboard. He notices, he remembers, he boards in order of arrival. I’ll write two letters to Southwest – Eric gets his own.

1:25 p.m.
Comfortably situated in the first row of seats, we get to hear and see Flight Attendant Bingo (“After four girls, BINGO, we have a boy!”), and that right there is worth the price of admission. He is firmly in control of this flight with reins we are happy to leave in his hands because he is so darn fun and pleasant. Friendly, really, affable. He greets every person – not every fifth person, not every time he happens to look up, but every single person –  as they board the plane as though welcoming us to a party at his home. He notices the bling of princess attire (we are in Orlando, you know), the hats of fellow veterans, reads the t-shirs on the young boys. This is going to be a good flight.

3:15 p.m.
We arrive in Atlanta, and because Nancy moves at the speed of frozen molasses, we wait to let just others get off first. Every passenger makes a point to smile and say “Thank you” to Bingo as they leave. It changes the air we breathe, all that gratitude. Yes, Bingo set the tone for the fight, and he is pitch perfect. I’ll write three letters.

Bingo frequently glances out the door to assure us there’s a wheelchair waiting for us. He even offers to hold up the line so we can get off, and we tell him we’d prefer to wait a little longer so as not to back things up. Finally it is time for us to get off, and just as Nancy’s foot crosses the threshold separating airplane from jetway, we spy a woman take her seat in the waiting wheelchair while her husband gets behind her to push, and off they go in a great big hurry. Bingo hollers after them, but they don’t even look back. We get Nancy completely off the plane and stop. It’s the only thing we can do. As they exit the plane, the pilots tell us they’ll make sure somebody brings back a wheelchair. Nobody does.

A female gate agent comes out and says Nancy will have to walk because there are no more wheelchairs. “It’s a long walk,” I tell her, “this could take a while.” I turn around so I can take both of Nancy’s hands in mine and walk backwards down the jetway, guiding her and alerting her to inclines and speed bumps. Though I know she’s anxious for us to get off the jetway so they can have an on-time departure, the gate attendant never says so, slowing her pace to match ours, holding onto Nancy’s left elbow as we make our way towards the terminal. Eventually, we make it to the gate area, and voila – there’s a wheelchair waiting on us . . . in the gate area . . . at the end of a l-o-n-g jetway.

On the train, off the train and into the l-o-n-g line for the elevator that will land us at baggage claim, we find ourselves behind the woman and man who took Nancy’s wheelchair. The man (her pusher) makes his way to the front of the line and informs people that his ride is waiting on them upstairs, and when nobody will let him break to the front of the line, a miracle occurs: the woman stands, hoists her bag, and the two of them walk back to take the escalator to baggage claim, leaving the vacated wheelchair sitting empty in line.

5:30 p.m.
We pick up our daughter, get a quick bite to eat, then drop Andy and Nancy back at the house to enjoy (I use the term lightly, as it turns out) the second half of the Georgia Tech game while we run an errand. Once back, I sit and try to write this post, but my brain is screaming for sleep, threatening to post unintelligible nonsense, so I prepare the photos then sit and stare at the screen until 9 p.m. when we can give Nancy her bedtime meds and call it a day.

SaveSaveSaveSave

SaveSaveSaveSave

Day 3 of the International Quilt Festival

As I write this, I am feeling sad that today is the last day. Yesterday was another remarkable, indescribably astonishing and magical day with so many people coming back to the booth to be with the quilts or to talk some more. Many people came back, bringing others they wanted to show it to. There’s just too much to tell you right now because I am hoping to get this posted in time to have breakfast and a shower today (something that hasn’t happened since Wednesday!). I also want to get back to the convention center and have time to be with the quilts myself as today at 4, we will lovingly take them down and send them to their next destination. I have so much to tell y’all, but for now, some photos from yesterday. There were people . . .

At The 70273 Project Interactive Booth in the 100 Aisle, things are constantly bustling as people make Friendship Blocks using markers on fabric and the handy-dandy template Elaine Smith created. Many bouquets of thanks to those who volunteered at the IAB over the course of the Festival: Peggy Thomas, Tari Vickery, Linda Moore, Caroline Rudisill, Elaine Smith, Judy Jochen, Shannon Timberlake, Frances Alford, Cindy Cavallo, and Mary Green. Visitors can make Friendship Blocks and/or take a Go Bag filled with everything you need (except scissors and a needle) to make a small block. All blocks made at the Festival will go into a special Festival 2017 quilt, and of course, each pair of red X’s commemorates one life.

These two treasures – Tari Vickery and Peggy Thomas – have been here every minute of every day. The Engineer and I could not have done it without them. Yesterday they came over to the Special Exhibit to help talk to people – yes, it kept 5 of us busy because there were that many visitors!

I finally got to meet Caroline Rudisill in person! She split her time between the Interactive Booth and the Special Exhibit, and today she’s bringing her two boys to help with set strike.

And oh my goodness, what on earth would I do without The Engineer (who’s called Andy behind the scenes). He hasn’t sat down a single time since we’ve been here. There are always people,
so he’s always telling them about The 70273 Project.

Catherine Bonte, President of the French Patchwork Guild, came by. We looked at all the French quilts (there are many that were also exhibited in Lacaze, France in June of this year). Here we are in front of a quilt that was pieced by Katell Renon. I have a story to tell you about this, but no time now, except to say that when I mentioned my friend Chantal who is gathering blocks for us in France, Catherine knew I meant Chantal Baquin without me having to mangle her last name. (I get very self-conscious when speaking French to people from France! They pronounce the words so melodiously. I don’t.) If you live in France and have blocks to send, please contact Chantal Baquin for her mailing address. Catherine and I share a hope that One Day, all – as in every single one – of The 70273 Project quilts will be exhibited somewhere in France.

Now y’all, I tell you what: I don’t let dogs lick me (especially on the face) ’cause I know where their mouth has been. But Neely, the seeing eye dog? He’s different. With his owner’s permission,
I let him lick me till he didn’t have any saliva left to lick me with.

Emma from the Quilt Alliance came by to do a quick 3-minute interview about the project.

And there were quilts. These are just a few of them, of course. Over the next several weeks, I’ll be profiling each quilt individually with stories and names of all who had a hand in creating them.

Quilt 185

Quilt 113

Quilt 111

Quilt 78

Quilt 76

Quilt 75

Quilt 70

Quilt 60

Quilt 54

Quilt 45

Quilt 28

Quilt 23

Walls of The 70273 Project Special Exhibit

And that’s not all! This morning I received these photos . . .

From Uta Lenk, the German Ambassador for The 70273 Project, this photo of 80 commemorations made in Germany, now on their way to be pieced and quilted.

And from Lucy Horner, a 70273 Project Ambassador in the U.K., this photo showing quilts being made that will fill Rochester Cathedral in January 2018. More about that soon.

With that, I’m off to go commune with the quilts before the doors open. Being at the International Quilt Festival is a phenomenal, amazing, magical opportunity and experience. Thank y’all for letting me be the steward for The 70273 Project.

~~~~~~~

Other places to gather around The 70273 Project water cooler:

Shop with Amazon Smile and support The 70273 Project.

Subscribe to the blog (where all information is shared).

Join the English-speaking Facebook group – our e-campfire – where you can talk to other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Join the French-speaking Facebook group – our other e-campfire – where you can chat with other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Like the Facebook page where you can check in for frequent updates.

Get folks to help celebrate your birthday by making blocks and/or donating bucks.

Follow the pinterest board for visual information.

Post using #the70273project on Instagram. (Please tag me, too, @whollyjeanne, so I don’t miss anything.)

Tell your friends what you want for your birthday.

And if you haven’t yet made some blocks, perhaps you’d like to put some cloth in your hands and join us.

Or maybe you’d like to gather friends and family, colleagues or students, club or guild members, etc. together and make a group quilt.

Older posts

© 2017 The 70273 Project

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑