The 70273 Project

with a side of Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

Category: 70273 (page 1 of 18)

Making Minis

 

A Mini Made by Cindy Cavallo

A Mini made by Kim Monins, Jersey, Channel Islands U.K.

Just in time for #GlobalBlockDay and Blockapalooza, a new way to make quilts: fabric postcards which will be called Mini Quilts or Minis for short. The spark for this idea goes to Jennifer Lario Moya who tucked the cutest mug rug into a batch of blocks, and one thing led to another, and here we are talking about how to make Minis.

A Mini made by Pam Patterson

To keep things creative to make and visually interesting to look at, there are some familiar guidelines/rules and some new guidelines/rules:

  • Minis must be made of fabric.
  • Minis are 6″ x 4″ / 15cm x 19cm – that is 6″/15cm wide x 4″/10cm tall. Think landscape or horizontal orientation.
  • Minis must have 3 layers: a top, stiff middle; backing. Top and backing must be fabric.
  • The top must be of white or slightly off white background.
  • Backing fabric can be whatever you choose, though many of the samples made by veteran postcard makers feature a light colored backing fabric so it can be made to look like a postcard.
  • Include as many pairs of red X’s as you like on the front of the Mini, but they must be presented in pairs, just like in Middlings, and each pair of red X’s will be considered a commemoration.
  • You must tell me on the Provenance Form how many pairs are in each Mini. You may send one Provenance Form with a batch of as many Mini Quilts as you want to create, and each Mini Quilt must have a note attached telling me the number of commemorations (pairs of red X’s) on that particular Mini.
  • Please no words, numbers, names, drawings, or symbols, etc. on the front – only pairs of red X’s.
  • Feel free to write a note or a favorite quote or make a drawing on the back, but say it with me: not on the front.
  • Embellishments (beads, lace, ribbons, textured fabrics etc.) are welcomed.
  • Edges must be finished in red or white.
  • If mailing them as postcards, check with your local post office for mailing regulations. (See notes below for more info.)
  • Even if you mail them in envelopes, please get the Minis hand canceled so that when they’re displayed, viewers can see how far they traveled.
  • Remember that the backs will often be displayed, so don’t write anything (like your address) you don’t want the world to see.

Another Mini made by Pam Patterson

Minis Made by Jennifer Lario Moya

PLANNING COMMITTEE
Thank you and thank you big to these people for teaching me about fabric postcards, making samples, and helping me figure out how to turn them in to Minis for The 70273 Project:
Betty Hedrick
Carolyn Katzoff
Chantal Baquin
Janet Hartje
Jennifer Lario Moya
Kim Monins
LindaMarie Davinroy Smith
Margaret Andrews
Marjorie Holme
Pam Patterson
Suzanne McCarthy

From Pam Patterson

From Pam Patterson

From Kim Monins

From Cindy Cavallo

MAILING

  • Just mailed my postcards. Because they are fabric, the postal service was going to treat them as a parcel and put one of those ugly stickers all across it, even after I specified “hand cancellation”. After I said WAIT! the post lady did not apply the sticker. I explained to her I needed it to really be handcancelled (stamped with a stamper.) Since the post office rules did not allow that, we came up with a plan for her to handcancel the fabric and then mail all three postcards in a mailer. It cost $3 and something cents to mail all three that way. Mission accomplished. ~ Pam Patterson
  • The US post office will mail postcards without envelopes only if they’re thinner than 1/4″. ~ Marjorie Holme
  • I don’t know a lot about the French Post Office, I probably wouldn’t send it  except inside an envelope. ~ Chantal Baquin
  • Fabric postcards are an art form in themselves. postal art. That has gone thru the post in a normal way, with a PO cancelled stamp. ~ Kim Monins
  • If I put my fabric postcards in a clear envelope, my local post office made me put the stamp on the envelop and wouldn’t take time for hand cancelling. ~ Janet Hartje
  • Clear envelopes protect any embellishments like beads etc. I have occasionally mailed in a clear envelope but get thE PO to hand cancel the stamp before sealing it. So it’s ‘legal’ AND looks like it’s made its journey! ~ Kim Monins

A Mini Made by Kitty Sorgen

TECHNIQUE

  • I’ve made a bunch of fabric postcards. As long as it’s less than 1/4″ thick, it mails with regular first class letter postage. I usually use the thick double fusible pellon, like is used for fabric bowls. I fuse plain muslin to the back and draw a traditional postcard back design with half for message and half for address. On the other side I fused my collaged/embroidered/stamped fabric piece. I prefer hand stitching so I usually buttonhole stitched the edges…most people use a machine stitch zigzag over the edge. It’s best to secure any embellishments, like buttons, well. Smaller things can be trapped under a layer of netting or tulle. ~ Marjorie Holme
  • Minis need a tiff middle which can be interfacing, buckram, Pellon or the like. ~ Kim Monins
  • Just as on blocks, red X’s can be painted, embroidered, hand stitched, appliquéd – apply them any way you choose.

I think these Minis will add much visual interest to exhibits, and they will fit into spaces where big quilts won’t. We welcome experienced fabric postcard makers, those who’ve been meaning to make fabric postcards, and those who never thought about it before, but adopt a why-not attitude and dive right in. We welcome Minis and look forward to seeing many of them on social media as you post on 14 October 2017, Global Block Day! If you have anything to add, please leave a comment or email me. And hey, thanks for telling all your friends ’cause I know you’re popular.

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Gentle People, Thread Your Needles

Q: What October 14 is?
A: The 20 month birthday of The 70273 Project

Q: How will we celebrate?
A: We’re throwing a Blockapalooza!

Let’s see how many blocks we can make on that one day – October 14, 2017.

Participation is easy:

  1. Cut a piece of white or nearly white fabric in one of these sizes: 3.5×6.5″ or 6.5×9.5″ or 9.5×12.5″ 2)
  2. Put two red Xs on it. Don’t sew? Don’t let that stop you cause there are many ways to lay those two red X’s down on the base of white or near-white fabric. You can use paint, permanent marker (red Sharpies work swell), ribbon, fabric, lace, embroidery, stencil, – whatever method you choose. If you enjoy sewing, you stitch those two red X’s down any way you want to. These quilts will not be washed, so don’t worry too much about the red being colorfast. No words, no numbers, no drawings or symbols – just two red Xs. That’s all that goes on the blocks. That’s it. Period.
  3. Grab yourself a badge like the one above and share on social media on October 14 (or even before to build enthusiasm and give folks time to gather supplies) to help us get the word out and encourage your friends become involved. Use the hashtags #globalblockday and #the70273project to show us your blocks or quilts and to let us know how many people you’ve commemorated.
  4. Repeat as many times as desired.
  5. Get involved and get others involved. Let folks know you’re participating by mashing the “going” button on the Facebook event then invite your friends and make a pledge in the comments. Pen a blog post about Global Block Day or invite me to write one for you. Or maybe you’re a shop or a library or an organization or an individual who’d  like to host a physical or virtual Global Block Day Event and write a post for me?  Let me know.
  6. Fill out a Provenance Form and mail with your blocks or quilts.

A few notes . . .

  • If you have blocks, a quilt made from your blocks, or a Middling you’re working on and just haven’t gotten around to finishing, get that needle in motion so it can be included in our numbers for Global Block Day or Blockapalooza.
  • Can’t stitch on October 14? I’m gonna’ make it easy for you: Global Block Day is October 14, and Blockapalooza starts today, October 7, and runs till November 14 to allow time for stitching and shipping. Blocks, Middlings, or quilts made from your own blocks received by me or an Ambassador by the end of 11/14/17 will be counted as Global Block Day/Blockapalooza contributions and added to the official block count.
  • If you have a stack of blocks or a Middling or a quilt made from your blocks that you’ve been meaning to get in the mail but just haven’t gotten around to it, get around to it in time for me to receive it by November 14. If you’re in Europe, let me know and I’ll put you in touch with a 70273 Project Ambassador near you.
  • Though they won’t be added to the official block quilt until received by Ambassadors or me, 70273 Project Ambassador Tari Vickery will be donning her green visor to keep a tally on 10/14/17 Global Block Day and keep us updated, so check in often to watch the numbers grow as this big beautiful rock we call Earth makes its way around the sun. After Global Block Day, look for Blockapalooza updates on the blog.
  • Join The 70273 Facebook Digital Campfire, like The 70273 Project Facebook, or subscribe to the blog to stay in the loop.
  • A big Thank you to 70273 Project Ambassador Sarah Jespersen Lauzon for creating the badge and easy-to-follow instructions. Please use the badge and share this post as often as possible to let others know about The 70273 Project and to encourage them to participate.
  • Another big Thank you to 70273 Project Ambassador Lucy Horner for researching and creating the hashtag #GlobalBlockDay.
  • And last but not least, a big Thank you to y’all for helping us remind and/or convince the world that Every life has value. Every. Single. Life.

Now let’s get busy commemorating.

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The 70273 Project in Germany

In Germany, Uta Lenk, German Ambassador for The 70273 Project is quite busy. . .

She just finished quilting The 70273 Project Quilt #265 containing 117 commemorations made by Conny Fleck and members of The Quilter vom Junfernkopf.

Uta and Chantal

Last month while waiting on the shuttle when attending the Ste. Marie-aux-Mines in France and, Uta spied two red X’s on a name tag and met Chantal Baquin, a 70273 Project Ambassador from France.

The Engineer and I had so much fun with Uta and her son
when they came for a visit in late August of this year.
There was stitching,

 

boating

sliding down web, slippery boulders

eating fast food

and did I mention stitching?

When she’s not quilting or teaching or dying fabric or traveling or attending quilt gatherings, Uta writes blog posts and makes blocks to commemorate those we honor. If you’re in Germany or the vicinity of Germany and want to make blocks or quilts, let me know and I’ll put you in touch with Uta or go direct and leave her a comment on her blog. Thank you, Uta, for bringing Germany to The 70273 Project.

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How are you shaping your involvement in The 70273 Project? I’d love to talk to you, so please let me know what’s happening in your studio and in your part of the world.

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Make blocks.
Make Middlings.
Make quilts.
Subscribe to the blog.

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Things Are A-Buzz Across The Pond

I met Lucy Horner in an online photography class, and fell immediately in love with her exquisite photos and her enthusiastic, can-do personality. Though she undoubtedly had no idea what she was in for, it sure was a lucky day for me when she heard of The 70273 Project and offered to collect blocks in her area of the U.K. She is an amazing, talented dynamo of a woman, and I am hugely awed and grateful by all that is going on in her neck of the woods across The Pond. Writes Lucy in her most recent update . . . 

UPCOMING EVENTS:

Friday 13th October 7.30pm St Stephens Church, Maidstone Rd, Chatham ME4 6JE … We will be having a ‘Putting Together’ Evening.  If you are an experienced sewer with your own machine, please bring it along to St Stephens and help us start putting together the Rochester Cathedral Quilts.  Thank you to those of you who have already volunteered to put together quilts – YOU’RE AMAZING!  If you can help put together a quilt but don’t live near to Medway then do get in touch – bundles of blocks can be sent XX Email: Lucy for more info and if you can come along to St Stephens.

Friday 10th- Saturday 11th November 10 am-4.30 pm (4 pm on Saturday) – The Autumn Quilt Festival, Kent Showground, Detling, Kent ME14 3JF. Lucy and her Team 70273 will be block making and putting together quilts at the Grosvenor Show  What better way to commemorate Armistice Day in 2017 – making blocks and quilts for The 70273 Project.  Click on the link above for full details.

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Thank you thank you thank you XX Thank you to all of you wonderful people at The Great British Sewing Bee LIVE who stopped and made blocks, pledged blocks and have promised to give our Project wings by getting their sewing groups, schools and community groups involved back home. Thank you to Berol, Bev, Debs, Edina, Gabby, Linda, Louise, Lydia, Sal and Sally who donated their days to run the stand.  To Upper Street Events for the opportunity to spread our message, and to our fellow stand holders for making blocks and donating fabric & ribbon XX

Here are some photos from The Great British Sewing Bee Live, and I love how they contain the meditation of people stitching to remember somebody, the connection and chat with whoever they are sitting next to, and the happiness at contributing to this beautiful blanket of love that we want to wrap the world in.

Val flew over from Toulouse to be at the show and was delighted and surprised to see two of the French Quilts being displayed at The Great British Sewing Be LIVE.  She contributed blocks to the quilts that were displayed in Lacaze, in the South of France back in June.  Twenty of these quilts are now doing a UK tour, and will be on display in Durham and Rochester Cathedral next year.

This week is National Inclusion Week, and this year the theme is ‘Connect for Inclusion’.  This could be the perfect week and way to introduce The 70273 Project to groups, schools and colleges.

And big thanks to Louise Back for cutting all those 100’s and 100’s of blocks up for TGBSBL!  If you’ve got sheets and white fabric to donate then let us know!

271 blocks arrived through the post this week … many from people who pledged to make blocks at TGBSBL.  Jill Nibloe sent a letter with hers which sums things up beautifully:

‘Dear Ladies, I am very pleased, proud and humbled to take part in this Project.  I have worked for many years supporting secondary school students with learning difficulties, so when I saw the stand at the Sewing Bee show I was hooked.  I had no idea about Aktion T4 so this is a way of spreading love around the world and perhaps atoning a little for all the ‘wrongs’ that happen.  Many thanks and lots of love.’  Lots of love to you Jill!  We salute you! XX

Photo By Clive Tanner

Photo By Colin Tolhurst

And finally, The 70273 Project received a royal block when the Countess of Wessex visited Rochester Cathedral and she took time to make her own commemoration. The Countess was visiting the newly opened Cathedral Library and also touring the tactile timeline in the Textus Roffensis exhibition space which the incredibly talented and delightful Wendy Daws and the Kent Association for the Blind Medway Art Group were involved in, as well as The Crypt Glass Manifestation which was created and designed by artists from the Kent Autistic Trust.  Both of these groups will be involved in creating the altar hanging for The 70273 Project which will be on display in the Cathedral from Mid January to early March.

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A hearty Thank you to you, Lucy, and the dynamic Team 70273 you’ve put together. I can’t wait to be over there next year and meet y’all in person.

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Other places to gather around The 70273 Project water cooler:

Join the English-speaking Facebook group – our e-campfire – where you can talk to other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Join the French-speaking Facebook group – our other e-campfire – where you can chat with other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Like the Facebook page where you can check in for frequent updates.

Follow the pinterest board for visual information.

Post using #the70273project on Instagram. (Please tag me, too, @whollyjeanne, so I don’t miss anything.)

And if you haven’t yet made some blocks, perhaps you’d like to put some cloth in your hands and join us.

Or maybe you’d like to gather friends and family, colleagues or students, club or guild members, etc. together and make a group quilt.

If you’d prefer to work solo and need a little more room to spread your creative wings, consider making a Middling.

Block Count Update!

Block #17311 by Christine Prades

I’ve had a productive week while feeding, chauffeuring, and otherwise tending to our daughter during her post-surgery complications. I’ll tell you about all those exciting things in various blog posts to come. Today, I’ll cut right to the chase and give you the block count info. This week I checked in blocks from:
Malek Suleiman (US)
Jennifer Suleiman (US)
Sylvie Keryhuel (FR)
Mireille Grot (FR)
Evelyne Ollivier (FR)
Isabelle Comte (FR)
Annie Hemmerlin (FR)
Catherine Guignol-Moraine (FR)
Agnes Rozenknop (FR)
Anne-Marie Andrau (FR)
Marianne Petition (FR)
Evelyne Lattore (FR)
Chantal Benoudiz (FR)
Annick Petit (FR)
Suzanne Mounters (FR)
Aline Bouchard (FR)
Bethany Sharpton (US)
Amy Castillo (US)
Jeffrey Allen-Kantrowitz (US)
Carlyn Clark (US)
Wendy Caton Reed (US)
Barbara Williamson (US)
Jeffrey Bovee (US)
Becky Ludden (US)
Joanne Sowa ((US)
Alisa Stedman (US)
Sophie Hudson (UK)
Pauline Jennings (UK)
Alida Palmisano (UK)
Avril Bond (England)
Sue Maudling (England)
Ros Masrin (UK)
Karen Bingham (UK)
Jean Higgins (England)
Ginny Crosthwait (US)
Janet Eidem (US)
Carolyn Katzoff (US)
Barbara Ellis (US)
Dian Dresdner (US)
Sam Bell (Scotland)
Jean Dargie (Scotland)
Pamela Cameron (Scotland)
Elsie Swales (Scotland)
Roger Clare (Scotland)
Patricia Menzies (Scotland)
Teresa Parnham (Scotland)
Jean Iso (UK)
Liz Crichton (Scotland)
Sally Bennett (Scotland)
Sylvia Clark (Scotland)
Anonymous

and a quilt from:
Quilt 264 Edna Dorris (US)
(Don’t panic if you sent quilts in. I have 3 to 5 boxes that I simply haven’t had time to open yet, and I’m sure there’ll be more waiting for me when I get back up on the mountain.

I assigned several more quilt numbers and have other quilts yet to be checked in. I was interviewed several times, and did A LOT of infrastructure work that we’ll talk about later. For now, let’s get an answer to what we all want to know: how many blocks do I have right now?

Are you ready?

As of right now, our official block count stands at :::::: 24,720! Maybe one of you mastheads can figure out what percentage that is, all I know is that’s a lot of blocks checked in since our last update 12 days ago. Be sure to scroll down to the bottom of the page and look at how our graph tube is filling up! And I know there are thousands of blocks being stitched and quilts being made around the world even as I type, so please keep commemorating and sending them in. And always, always, always, Thank you.

~~~~~~~

Other places you might want to visit:
The Introduction Post
The English-speaking Facebook Group (Our Digital Campfire)
The French-speaking Facebook Group
The Facebook Page
To Subscribe and Have Blog Posts Delivered to You
Block Instructions
To Make and Register a Quilt
To Make Middling Quilts
To Make Long Skinnies Quilts
Pinterest Board

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Just Look at These Blocks from Scotland

What are the chances I’d open two envelopes from Scotland as I check in blocks today? (I should’ve bought a lottery ticket!)

Sam Bell sent these beautiful blocks – one in each size – and a copy of the Spring 2017 issue of The Quilter magazine, the periodical of The Quilters’ Guild of the British Isles because on page 9 is a short article about The 70273 Project and the good work U.K. Ambassadors Mary Turner, Margaret Jackson, and Chrissy Fitzgerald are doing along with other members of the Coxhoe Quilters.

Envelope #400 is filled with many blocks and this delightful note from Petrina Menzies, a Development Worker at The Session House & Open Learning Centre in Perthshire . . .

Dear Jeanne,
Enclosed are the blocks made from a very small group of ladies in Perthshire Scotland. Working on the blocks gave the ladies time to give thoughts and prayer to something that we had all forgotten. Thank you to you for spreading the word about your wonderful project.
Yours sincerely,
Petrine Menzies

Made by Jean Iso

Made by Liz Crichton

Made by Teresa Parnham

Made by Teresa Parntiam

Made by Sylvia Clark

Made by Sally Bennett

 

Made by Petrine Menzies

Made by Elsie Swales

Made by Jean Dargie

Made by Pamela Cameron

And there were a few blocks made by people who wish to remain anonymous.

Big thanks to all the people in Scotland who’ve made blocks and who will make and send blocks. We still have many people to commemorate, though, so keep stitching, y’all.

~~~~~~~

Other places you might want to visit:
The Introduction Post
The English-speaking Facebook Group (Our Digital Campfire)
The French-speaking Facebook Group
The Facebook Page
To Subscribe and Have Blog Posts Delivered to You
Block Instructions
To Make and Register a Quilt
To Make Middling Quilts
To Make Long Skinnies Quilts
Pinterest Board

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Blocks Being Made Around the World

More block drives, y’all . . .

Susan Luff sends photos from today’s Block Drive and Workshop for The 70273 Project organised by Edina Geering and held in Culverstone Community Centre in Meopham. “An amazing amount of love has gone into making all these blocks – it was a pleasure to be able to help,” writes Susan. “It was also quite chilling and surreal as I was sewing today to imagine that I was sewing someone’s life.”

 

 

 

L to R: Susan and Edina

Our Edina fell and dislocated her toe, leaving her foot a colorful array of bruises. She will be at The Great British Sewing Bee tomorrow as scheduled, but she needs help, so if you’re going, please consider volunteering your time for at least a little while.

The amazing, dynamic Lucy Horner sends these photos from The Great British Sewing Bee today where more blocks were made and pledged:

 

 

Three Generations of Women Stitching Blocks for The 70273 Project

And over in Franklinton, Louisiana, Mary Teresa Green held a workshop for the Queen Bees Guild and sends these photos and words:

“Today I hosted a 70273 Block Making Party at one of my quilt guilds, The Queen Bees of Franklinton, LA,” Mary writes. “The members had a great time and took a lot of white squares and red fabric to make blocks. In Franklinton, Louisiana. One member who wasn’t able to make it to the meeting even texted me photos of two blocks she made ahead of time.  Everyone was very moved and motivated. The members will continue to make blocks and bring hand them in to me to send to you.  The Queen Bees  have two steadfast rules: leave your bad attitude at the door and you don’t have to do anything you don’t want to. Those rules make for a laid back group that is amazingly productive.”

 

 

 

 

 

So many people being commemorated with reverence and beauty. Please keep making blocks, Middlings, Long Skinnies, and block quilts, encouraging your friends and family to join in, and send me photos and stories. I’ve got some important news coming out over the next few days, so be sure you either subscribe to the blog or check back here frequently so you’re always in the know.

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Making Blocks at The Great British Sewing Bee

The Great British Sewing Bee opened today, and thanks to the efforts of 70273 Project Ambassador Lucy Horner (who took and sent every one of these photos),  Edina Geering (you met her and her adorable and precocious granddaughter on Hever Castle weekend), and I don’t know who all else, The 70273 Project has a beautiful booth and plenty of block making supplies ready for the making. And oh the making that did happen today . . .

Patrick  Grant
– Great British Sewing Bee judge and menswear fashion designer –
stopped by today and promises to be back tomorrow to make a block.

Thank you for the shout-out Natasha McCarty
of Channel 78, The Sewing Quarter,
and for going back tomorrow to make a block.

So if you live in the vicinity (or even if you don’t),
get yourself over to The Great British Sewing Bee
sometime before it closes on 9/24/2017
to enjoy the sights;
meet Edina, Lucy, Berol, and Debs;
and make a block or three to commemorate
these special people we honor.

Who knows? You might even get to drive through
a rainbow on the way home,
as did Lucy, Edina, Berol, and Debs today.

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There’s a lot coming up in The 70273 Project,
and here’s how to make sure you don’t miss a thing:
subscribe to the blog
join the English Facebook group
join the French Facebook group
like the Facebook page
follow along on Instagram
have a look at the Pinterest board

About Those Two Red X’s

Block #1, made by Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

They’re such a little thing,
a simple design, folks say,
and yet they’re incredibly hard to make.

When I sat to stitch the first block,
I had no trouble cutting out the base
or threading the needle.
I had no trouble cleaning toilets
or cleaning out the dishwasher
or going to the grocery store.
But I had much trouble
stitching two red X’s.
The fact that they represented
a life
did not escape my heart,
my brain,
or my hands.
Continue reading

Highlights and Recap: August 14, 2017 to September 17, 2017

Here are highlights of the weeks that were:

Week 79, August 14-20, 2017
Two people mentioned corporate matching programs and began investigating. Do you know of a corporation that offers grants or have matching funds programs? Let me know because there are expenses . . . especially shipping.

Week 80, August 21-27, 2017
Uta Lenk, The 70273 Project Ambassador from Germany and her son, Jan came to spend a few days with us. There was basketball, fast food, Sliding Rock, boat rides, antique stores, and, of course, stitching blocks. We had so much fun and can’t wait for them to come back.

I shipped three big boxes of quilts to Houston for our Special Exhibit at the International Quilt Festival. They arrived on the same day as Harvey. Yeah, really. More about that in a blog post coming to you soon.

Daughter Alison had emergency surgery.

Week 81, August 28-September 3, 2017
A week filled with mother-as-nurse duties with 70273 duties and responsibilities and infrastructure projects in between. I delivered another suitcase filled with quilts to Laurel Alford who graciously agreed to sew labels and hanging sleeves on.

A magnificent weekend across The Pond at Hever Castle where blocks were made and people were commemorated.

I am honored to be invited to spend Saturday morning, 9/2 with the Dixie Wing Angel Squad, telling them about The 70273 Project. They’ve decided to make enough blocks to make their own quilt, something I consider a Very Good Idea.

Week 81, September 4-10, 2017
Michelle Freedman (@stitchwellandprosper on Instagram) hosted a Block Drive at Modern Domestic on 9/4. People made blocks and watched Quilt #219 being quilted on the long arm.

Quilt 219

Bethany Sharpton and Chris Petersen from WXII 12 News came and interviewed me about The 70273 Project. Bethany also treated me to a solo-exhibit-of-her-quilts-for-one.

Week 83: September 4-10, 2017
Hurricane (Tropical Storm by the time she reached us) irma came; the power went, remaining out from Monday night till Friday morning.

The 70273 Project received a financial donation from Frances Holliday Alford, who makes a monthly donation. Thank you, Frances! You have supported The 70273 Project in every way imaginable. it does not go unnoticed or unappreciated.

Over and around all of these highlights, much work was going on – most of which I’ll tell you about in blog posts coming soon. Blocks were bundled, so let me know if you’d like to And quilts were registered and added to the official block count. Would you like to make your own quilt and register it with The 70273 Project? Or turn a bundle of blocks into a quilt? Perhaps you’d like to make a Middling for The 70273 Project? And remember that we still and always accept blocks, so get those needles threaded and go forth to stitch more commemorations.

And that’s not all: I still have many, many, many blocks and entire quilts waiting to be checked in and counted. This week, I spent my time checking in these complete, finished quilts (and I only mention the block makers because we’re counting the blocks. Full information will be included when I profile each quilt in its own blog post)

Quilt 14, a Middling by yours truly
Quilt 15, another Middling by moi
Quilt 58 (the extra blocks made by Margaret Williams to complete the top)
Quilt 59 (extra blocks created by Margaret Williams to complete the top)
Quilt 65 (blocks made by Sandy martin to complete the top)
Quilt 71 (blocks made by Brighter Skies, Elizabeth Budgeon, Savvy Christophides, Jane Coulter, Joyce duncan, Chrissie Fitzgerald, Margaret Grieves, Helen Grindley, Margaret Jackson, C. Knight, Shirley Gliver, V. Pearson, Linda Smalley, Ellen Smith, and Mary Turner)
Quilt 73 (blocks made by Mary Turner, Margaret Jackson, and others)
Quilt 105 (blocks made by Alexandrian Pattin to complete the top)
Quilt 111 (made by Cathrine Symchych)
Quilt 127 (from Nouvelle Aquitaine – blocks made by Nicole John, Magali Sallard, Francoise Sebilleau, Francoise Frontenaud, Francoise Lelionnais, Adrienne, maryLou Renault, and Annie Sellier)
Quilt 128 (from Nouvelle Aquitaine with blocks made by Nanette Andersen, C. Andersen, Town Andersen, Marie Alice Wilke, Nome Wilke, Raphael Wilke, Charlotte Wilke, Camille Wilke, Lunette Arrive, Micheline Monvoisin, Jacqueline Guichard, Taffathe Saldani, Francoise Lelionnais, Francoise Fresneau, Marie-Jeanne Pannier, and Nicole Brard)
Quilt 141 (blocks made by Makers from Belgium and members of Du Club de Leognan France)
Quilt 145 (a Middling by Cathy Busson)
Quilt 149 (blocks made by Eva Jackson)
Quilt 152 (a Middling made by Chantal Trouillot)
Quilt 153 (blocks by Christine Richter (Germany), Pia Magnusson (Sweden), Annette Lenk (Germany), and Hannah (Germany))
Quilt 156 (blocks by Anne Vignals and Anonymous Makers)
Quilt 159 (a Middling made by Danielle Birello)
Quilt 177 (a Middling made by Deirdre McConathy)
Quilt 178 (blocks made by Members of Club Aussillion – Danielle Albert, Genevieve Bacque, Sylvaine Benezech, Regine Cahuzac, Cecile Milhau, Michele Mouton, Suzanne Pons, Fina Rodriguez, Lillians Several, Yvette Trombetta, and Lesley Westlake)
Quilt 173 (blocks made by members of the Leisure Time Crafting and Brighter Skies Fundraising Group of Spennymoor, Durham, UK)
Quilt 179 (a Middling made by Cindy Cavallo)
Quilt 186 (a Middling made by Debra Steinmann)
Quilt 210, (a Middling made by Jane M. McCarthy)

Wanna’ know the current official block count? You don’t? Oh you jokesters, you.

As of yesterday, the current official block count is . . . . 24,166! (Scroll to the bottom of the page to see how our graph is filling up!) The Engineer tells me that we are slightly more than one-third of the way to our goal, so please, y’all, keep stitching and telling and sending.

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