The 70273 Project

with a side of Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

Author: jeanne (page 2 of 108)

Holidays

Whatever you eat

Whatever you imbibe,

Whatever you say

Whatever you sing,

Whatever you decorate

Whatever you do . . .

I wish you deep, everlasting Peace

and more Good, Heartwarming Memories than you can count.

Quilt 335 of The 70273 Project

A white quilt with paris of red X's being held on the beach in front of the ocean

Some of the first people I heard from when I launched The 70273 Project were Kim Monins and Gisele Therezein, two creative, talented, dynamo women who immediately stepped up and put Jersey, Channel Islands U.K. on The 70273 Project map. Here we see Quilt #335 made of blocks made by these residents of Parish St. Helier:

two red x's stitched onto a white background

two red X's stitched to a base of white fabric

aa pair of red X's - one large and one smaller - stitched to a base of white fabric

Helen Asplet
Maureen Baxter
Edward Bell
Alison Brown
Amanda Carroll
Louise Cave
Martina Coppinger
Vic Tanner Davy
Susan De La Haye
Doreen Drever
Kathleen Freeley
Gloria Freeman
Sue Frost
Steph HaIron
Annie Le Brun
Anonymous
Pauline Le Bailly
Emily Martin
Simon Mash
Jean McLaughlin
Dorothy Patterson
Yvonne Rabet
Anne Richardson
Paul Routier
Pauline Routier
Bailey Shaw
Eberhard Stegenwalner
Marlene Stegenwalner
Andrew Sugden
Julie Sugden

pairs of red x's stitched to a background of white fabric
Quilt #335 measures 46.5″ x 79″ (118cm x 200cm) and commemorates 100 lives. Kim Monins is the Piecer, Quilter, and Finisher, and she’s also the woman who took these gorgeous photos. Doesn’t #335 look right at home in nature? From January 7 to 28, 2018, the Jersey Heritage Center is hosting an exhibit of The 70273 Project Quilts made in Jersey, Channel Islands U.K., and  I’ll be profiling more Channel Island  quilts in the coming days and telling you more about Kim and Gisele. They’re awesome.

Remember to sign up for The 70273 Project XXtra newsletter. First edition coming out soon. And thank you for continuing to commemorate the 70273.

The 70273 Project Emporium Grand Opening

a mound of red ribbons lay on top of a white quilt with pairs of red X's

Welcome to the Grand Opening of The 70273 Project Emporium, our shiny new online shop!

A few notes . . . New items will be added periodically – like more art quilts, for example – so do check back, and because I’m the stockist, shelf elf, manufacturer, clerk, and mail room, the shop will close periodically when I know I won’t be here to ship things. Shipping prices are for the US only because, honestly, I don’t know how to calculate international shipping charges. But I will go to the post office and ask, so if you live outside the US and see a little something you’d like, let me know. I’ll hold it for you and get back to you about the shipping charges. I’ll even hand deliver it if you’re gonna’ be at either Rochester or Durham Cathedrals when I’m there in January.

Oh, one more thing: if you have something you’d like to contribute – something we can sell to raise money for The 70273 Project coffers – let me know.

Now click right this way to do some shopping for yourself or others.

Thank you for your continued support of The 70273 Project. You’re awesome. Happy shopping! Wish I had some hot cider to offer you to sip on while you make your selections. But you’d probably spill it on your keyboard, anyway.

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Preparing Quilts for Durham Cathedral

quilts made of white bases covered with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables at Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

Quilts are being made to  hang in Rochester Cathedral from January 19 to March 12, 2018, and in another part of the U.K., quilts are being made to hang in Durham Cathedral from January 25 to 29, 2018.

white quilts of all sizes adorned with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables at Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

The ladies of Coxhoe quilters have been stitching and educating local students for a year, and last week they decided to take stock to see what still needs to be done, so all the quilts made locally were taken into Coxhoe Village Hall and draped from the stage and over chairs and tables. “What an amazing sight it was to see all those quilts together in one space,” writes Margaret Jackson, a U.K. Ambassador for The 70273 Project. “The expression on Chrissie Fitzgerald’s face said it all – if only I’d had a camera ready to record it!”

Margaret reports that they have most of the piecing, quilting, and finishing done now, but still have about four bundles of blocks to put together. Various members of the Coxhoe Quilters took a bundle so the quilts could be ready when it’s time to deliver the quilts to the cathedral. “Coxhoe quilters is a small group,” says Margaret, “and many of the members are relatively new to quilting, but they have pulled out all the stop to ensure Durham’s contribution to The 70273 Project is a beautiful success.”

quilts of all sizes, each with a white base adorned with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables at Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

The biggest challenge is the largest of the quilts comprised of 395 blocks and measuring 16 feet by 8 feet. It was made in nine smaller sections which have been joined into three rows of three sections each – something that will be done when the Coxhoe Quilters gather at the Village Hall on January 8. “We’re taking sandwiches,” Margaret says with a chuckle, “because it will be a BIG job.” There will no doubt be cakes, too, as Eva is very good at keeping her fellow quilters sustained.

“We are still flabbergasted by the response we have had,” says Margaret. “Everybody has been so generous. It is amazing how The 70273 Project draws in people who are committed to compassion and kindness.”

Two members of the Coxhoe Quilters deserve a special mention here: Marjorie Collins has contributed almost 200 blocks, and Julie Lovatt (Margaret’s hairdresser) has contributed over 150 blocks.

whit3e quilts embellished with pairs of red X's are draped over chairs and tables in the Coxhoe Village Hall in the U.K.

“Everything is going to plan,” Margaret says with confidence. “What an amazing sight it will be in the magnificent Durham Cathedral which has stood in Durham since AD 996. A fitting place to commemorate some of the 70,273 lives cut short.”

~~~~~~~

Marjorie, Julie, Chrissie, Mary, Margaret, and many other Coxhoe Quilters have commemorated many of those we honor. Please share these posts because you never know who’ll see it and want to become a part of The 70273 Project and go see the quilts at either Rochester Cathedral or Durham Cathedral – such is the magic of social media. I have over 7000 blocks waiting to be pieced and quilted. Interested? Let me know.

Postcard from Across the Pond

Writes The 70273 Project Ambassador, Lucy Horner . . .

We will be filling the Nave of Rochester Cathedral with XX from Friday 19th January to Monday 12th of March.  Many thanks to Rochester Cathedral’s management committee for extending the time period to give more people chance to see it, and for extending the scope of the display area so that we can commemorate even more people.

On Wednesday 24th January, we will be gathering to remember, celebrate, thank, and raise a glass … more details to follow!

 Thank you to Grosvenor Shows for hosting us at the Autumn Quilt Show at Detling, and thank you to all of you who came, and sat and stitched our Middlings and commemorated more lives.
Edina and The A Team Facilitate a Block Drive for The 70273 Project in the UK

It’s so good to see Edina, back on her pins, and firing on all cylinders again with her A Team of helpers after breaking her foot a few months back.  This Project runs on Love, and everyone who helps with it makes sacrifices … whether it is their time, aching fingers … (or brains) … family time … ‘me’ time … or dipping into their coffers, but Edina really has given so much to The 70273 Project.  There’s no way that our South East contribution would be where it is without her. Thank you Edina! XX

a collage of people in the UK making blocks for The 70273 Project
More quilts and blocks being made in the U.K.
an assortment of people making blocks in the U.K.

Thanks to Francis Iles Galleries in Rochester, we will be swelling the coffers of The 70273 Project as they raise funds with their Art on a Postcard Sale.  Their Gallery Artists have donated original works that will be sold on the night of Thursday 30th of November from 6pm for £25 each, and proceeds will be split between The 70273 Project and The Cinnamon Trust.

The donation of people’s time in making blocks and commemorations is invaluable, but we also have a number of wonderful people to thank who have given us donations towards materials.  They are

Medway Council who have given us a £250 grant, Rob Flood – whose company ‘Feet on the Ground’ generously provided £200 for materials for the altar banners, Bev Bunn who donated money from her lemon-sherbert-loving Dad Vic’s funeral donations, Christine Tedman and Roy Clarke THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH … the cost of materials for the South East 70273 Project is running towards £1,000 so all donations are very much appreciated.

students at Waldegrave School in the U.K. make blocks for The 70273 Project
Nicole Davis, Head of Design & Technology, Fashion & Textiles at the Waldegrave School in the U.K., looks at the quilts and blocks made for The 70273 Project by students
Students at the Waldegrave School in the United Kingdom make blocks for The 70273 Project
Wearing the blue sweaters of their school uniform, students of the Walgrave School in the United Kingdom use needle and thread to stitch red fabric in the shape of two red X's to a base of white fabric
More Waldegrave students make blocks for The 70273 Project

And talking of heroes … we met Nicole Davies at The Great British Sewing Bee Live a few months back and she pledged to get her students at Waldegrave School, (where she is Head of Design & Technology, Fashion & Textiles) to make some blocks.   Being an absolute super star, she’s been as good as her word, and has made 5 quilts!!  Thank you to Nicole, and the pupils, staff and parents who have helped in this massive achievement. XX

Teenage students of the Waldegrave School in the United Kingdom smile as they use red fabric to make pairs of red X's that are then stitched on a white base to become blocks for The 70273 Project
A female teenager wearing a blue sweater sits beside a female teenage student stitching pairs of red X's onto white bases to commemorate some of the 70273 disabled people who were murdered by Nazis
A female student of the Waldegrave School stitches two red X's on a white base to make a block for The 70273 Project
A female wearing glasses and a black sweater sews two red X's onto a white base to make a block for The 70273 Project
A huge bouquet of gratitude to Lucy for these photos and all the time and energy she’s poured into The 70273 Project, to Edina, Wendy, Nicole, Veronica, Waldegrave students, Frances Iles Gallery, Medway Council, Rob Flood, Bev Bunn, Christine Tedman, Roy Clarke, Siobhan, Sharon, and so many others who I will hopefully get to meet and thank in person when I’m there in January.
~~~~~~~
I’ve been wearing my Idea Hat which  means there will be many new things happening in The 70273 Project next year. To make sure you don’t miss anything that’s happening around the world:
subscribe to the blog
subscribe to The 70273 Project XXtra Newsletter
join The 70273 Project Campfire (English facebook group)
join Le Projet 70273 (French facebook group)
like The 70273 Project facebook page

It’s Time for Another Block Update

Photo Description: A big log sits stalled at the top of the waterfall, covered with 15″ or so of now.

Thanks to the 13-15 inches of snow that covers the ground here, for the first time in I don’t know how long, i have checked in all the blocks in my possession. That will, of course, change when we can get out and go back to the post office in 3-4 more days, but for now, today I checked in blocks from these lovely people:

BLOCKS RECEIVED
Ann Hewitt (UK)
Margaret Jackson (UK)
Mindy Masters (TX, US)
Pamela Jeffries (, SC, US)
Julie Young (TX, US)
Anonymous
Trist Seiner (TX, US)
Diana Lewis (AR, US)
Carol Biller (OH, US)
Jan Burke (PA, US)
Sandee Reynebeau (CO, US)
Connie Harrison (TX, US)
Lori Brewer (OH, US)
Laurie Wilcox (CA, US)
Barbara Kielaszek (TX, US)
Lisa Taglia (MN, US)
Judy Brinker (MO, US)
Linda Nichols (NC, US)
Deborah Sheridan (TX, US)
Heather Harbour-Bedsaul (NC, US)
Rose Marie Yates (TX, US)
Jean Mehaffey (FL, US)
Karen Adams (CA, US)
Debbie Gard (CA, US)
Kathy McCarthy (CA, US)
Cathy Hall (CA, US)
Judy Clifford (CA, US)
Mary Rapaz (CA, US)
Beth Davidson (Ca, US)
Cecily Zerega (CT, US)
Libby Williamson (CA, US)
Karen Fahel (TX, US)
Debbie Metti (OH, US)
Sharon K. Morton (OH, US)
Rebekah Delafield (TX, US)
Elaine Smith (TX, US)
Elizabeth Ferry Perkins (TX, US)
Caroline Rudisill (TX, US)
David Rudisill and Sean Rudisill (TX, US)
Wendy Tuma (MN, US)
Connie Albin (MN, US)
Emma Brinker (MN, US)
Ruth Brinker (MN, US)
Barbara J. Drentlaw (MN, US)
Amanda Roberts (MN, US)
Lydia Tilstra (Mn, US)

QUILT TOPS
Quilt tops 252 and 254, Pieced by Edna Jamandre (Anybody ready to quilt?)

QUILTS
Quilt 206, Pieced and Finished by Wendy Tuma; Quilted by Connie Albin of Turnberry Lane Quilting
Quilt 214, a block quilt Pieced by Patti Lapinsky, Quilted by Beth Schmidt, Finished by Marge Cree
Quilt 279, a Middling made by Roberta A. Pabst (CA, US)
Quilt 280, a Long Skinny made by Roberta A. Pabst (CA, US)
Quilt 282, a Middling made by Beth Schmidt
Quilt 369, a Middling made by Members of the Orlando Modern Quilt Guild (FL, US)
Quilt 370, a Middling made by Sarah Lauzon

Block count at the beginning of this post: 29,728
Block count at the end of this post: 32,239

# of blocks checked in today? 2500
How long did it take me? 7 hours
Am I complaining? Not one little bit.

To those who are mentioned in this post, thank you.
To those who continue to commemorate, thank you.
To those who will raise your hand and offer to piece and quilt, thank you.
To those who make financial donations, thank you.

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Middlings Being Made at Marbridge

Lynn Woll is a woman who does what she says she’s gonna’ do. I meet Lynn at The 70273 Project Special Exhibit at the International Quilt Festival in Houston, Texas last month. She asks if she can interview me for Create Whimsy, her beautiful blog, and she does. She tells me she is going to make quilts with her sister and friends at Marbridge, and she does.

On December 2, 2017, Lynn takes fabric and other supplies to Marbridge where 12 people make 12 Middlings.

Photo Description: A man wearing a red sweater and a big smile adds fabric in the shape of pairs of red X’s to a base of white fabric.

 

Photo Description: A woman wearing a green t-shirt weaves strips of red fabric to make a pair of red X’s on a base of white fabric.

 

Photo Description: A man wearing a white t-shirt and a big smile cuts and arranges red ribbon in the shape of pairs of X’s to a base of white fabric.

 

Photo Description: Janet, Lynn’s sister wears a big smile, a Christmas headband, and a long-sleeved t-shirt with the word “Texas” on it as she arranges red fabric as pairs of red X’s to a base of white fabric.

Writes Lynn after the quilt-making afternoon:

“I had 12 residents participate and made 12 Middlings. We had so much fun today, and I love sharing your story with the residents of Marbridge. I explained about WWII and the Nazis and how they didn’t like people who were different from them and that 70273 people who doctors said were different were murdered, and we were honoring those people. The resident got it – a few even said, ‘People like me?'”

Thank you Lynn, Janet, and friends at Marbridge. I can’t wait to hear more stories and see your finished quilts.

Audio of Jeanne reading this blog post
~~~~~~~
I’m starting a monthly newsletter – The 70273 Project XXtra –  that will be filled with bits of information you might be interested in and might not see anywhere else. Maybe you want to subscribe?

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Let’s Update the Block Count Why Don’t We

Before we talk numbers, this: beginning in December 2017, I’ll be sending out The 70273 Project XXtra  – a newsletter that will come out once a month filled with bits and pieces about The 70273 Project that you won’t see here on the blog, To subscribe, click right here. And hey, thanks for the name, Fiona Egan, Suzanne McCarthy, and Nancy Carroll.

Now about that block count update. I hope you’re sitting down . . .

Blocks:
Lisa Franzman (US)
patsy monk (US)
Janet Cates (US)
Elisabeth Miller (Germany)
Deb Bear (US)
Diana Vandeyar (Australia)
Kathy Odell (US)
Sharon Henry (US)
Anonymous
M. V. Wendell (US)
Nan Ryan (US)
Madeline Hughes (US)
Rosary Lomonaco (US)
Carol Oglesby (US)
Margaret Creek (UK)
Lori-Lyn Dunn (US)
Sandra Walker (Canada)
Rachel Williams (US)
Eve Trester-wilson (US)
Anita Barsalou (US)
Allison Ramboth (US)
Lindsay Norlen (US)
Lucy Poloniecka (UK)
Eileen DiPietro (US)
Patricia McNeely (US)
Jayne Elton (UK)
Sally Lindsay & Children & Grandchildren (US)
Janet Eidem (US)
Jeanie Crosthwait (US)
Maggie McCain (US)
Norie Mohs (US)
Jocelyne Feuguet (France)
Cabral Patchwork France
Club De La MJC de Claix (France)
Edna Jamandre (US)
Martine Molet-Bastien (France)
Patricia Barthelemy (France)
Association Filament (France)
Patch Patcha Ol’Hossegar (France)
Antoinette Kuborn (Belgium)
Claudine Oger (Belgium)
Brigitte Martin (Belgium)
Carmen Gayo (Belgium)
Nadia Van Comp (Belgium)
Agnes Camplon (Belgium)
Agnes Thys (Belgium)
Michelle Bellin (Belgium)
Club Patchwork Atelier Recreation Plan D’Orgon (France)
Vero Patch (Belgium)
Nicole Malcotti (France)
Nancy Bass (US)
Robin C. Perry (US)
Abbie Metti (US)
Debbie Burchell (Canada)
Sandy Dadck (US)
Liz Dougherty (US)
Theresa Elerman (US)
Dayna Harris (US)
Sacred Heart High School (Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK)
Sharleen Jespersen (US)
Beth Schmidt (US)
Dale Lauzon (US)
Sarah Lauzon (US)

# of Global Block Day / Blockapalooza blocks received: 3286 (included in blocks noted above)

Quilts (Future blog posts on each individual quilt will give more info and photos.)
#80 (France)

#81 from Chantal Baquin (France)

#130 from Chantal Baquin (France)

#131 (France)

#199, a Middling by Nan Ryan (US)

#235, a Middling made by Susan Long (US)

#248, a Long Skinny made by Love Sullivan with a block by Rosary Lomonaco

#281 (France)

# 306 with blocks made by Sarah Brookes, Kay Mills, Kay Coolbear, Marion Mackay, Judy Belgrave, Irene Miller, Sarah Russell, Susan Wright, Sigi Scrase, Ann Pibal, Elizabeth Niven, Alison Jones, Anne Groufsky, Errolyn Thane and Quilting Students, Anna Hicks, Fleur Morris and Stitch Sisters, Diane Harries, Anonymous, and Philippa Doyle (New Zealand)

#307 with blocks made by Philippa Doyle and Marilyn Daly (New Zealand)

#308 with blocks made by Susan Brookes, Trish Souness, Beth French, Viv Heiman, Rose Keen, Kay Mills, Kay Coolbear, Maria Cross, Pamela Lindon, Angela Tanzania, Adrienne Howard, Jacquelyn Bailey, Fyvie Murray, Vivienne Rathbone, Vera Sullivan, Carolyn Diamond, Sheryl Anicich, Catherine Watson, Debra DeLorenzo, Jill Nickel, Janet Wingrove, Beverly Featherstone, Jane Campbell, Anonymous (New Zealand)

#309 with blocks made by Marilyn Daly, Grace Wardell, Jill Bowman, Alison Elliot, Jude Ferguson, Anonymous, Claire Hodgson, Karen Simcox, Helen Hindmarsh, Sue Stephen, Christine Singleton, Pat Watkins, Celia Connor, Judy Johnson, Riet van Koeverden, Jocelyn Thornton (New Zealand)

#310, a Middling made by Bev Haring (US)

#311, a Mini made by Lori-Lyn Dunn (US)

#312, a Mini made by Lori-Lyn Dunn (US)

#313, a Mini made by Lori-Lyn Dunn (US)

#314, a Mini made by Lori-Lyn Dunn (US)

#315, a Mini made by Susan Grancio (US)

#316, a Mini made by Susan Grancio (US)

#317, a Mini made by Susan Grancio (US)

#318, a Mini made by Susan Grancio (US)

#319, a Middling made by Francoise N. Guyen (France)

#320, a Middling made by Francoise N. Guyen (France)

#323 made by Nicole Malcotti (France)

#324 made by members of Patchwork Surson (France)

#325 made by Delegation De France Patchwork D’Ille et Vilaine (France)

#326 made by Association Patchwork Apical Laüpere (France)

#331 made by members of Patchwork D’Issy Les Moulineaux et Vanves (France)

#332 made by members of St. Cast Le Guildo Côtes-D’Amour (France)

#333 made by members of Association Monisle en Patch (France)

#338, a Middling made by Debra Steinmann (US)

~~~~~~~

# blocks checked in on November 13, 14, 15, and 16 (Week 92): 4076
# quilts: 337 (I sure do need Piecers and Quilters)

Block count as of the beginning of this post: 25,652
Block count as of the end of this post: 29,728 

My heart explodes with gratitude to all who are . . .
~ making and sending blocks, finished quilts, Middlings, and Minis
~ hosting block drives in their communities, churches, libraries, and schools.
~  offering to Piece and Quilt
~ sending financial donations
~ volunteered at the recent International Quilt Festival
~ telling me their stories
~ stepping up to take on major responsibilities (I’m thinking of you, Peggy Thomas and Tari Vickery)
~ writing about The 70273 Project in social media
~ interviewing me for their blog
~ sharing The 70273 Project with quilt guilds and friends and other groups
~ keeping the spirit of The 70273 Project alive and well by being kind.

Y’all are The Best. Please don’t stop spreading the word and commemorating because enveloped in the commemorating we celebrate and champion those with disabilities who live today and move us closer and closer to a world where we talk not of abilities but simply of people.

~~~~~~~

Subscribe to the monthly newsletter The 70273 Project XXtra

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Join the Facebook group

Join the French Facebook group

Like The 70273 Project Facebook page

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Spending Thanksgiving with Nancy

My vision of a daily diary quickly
disappeared in an unceremonial poof
as the days grew long and full. Here are the highlights  . . .
Animals are usually quite leery of Nancy,
scurrying to unimaginably small hiding places.
I was very proud of Mother’s cats
who didn’t run from Nancy,
but got up close with their curiosity.

Our daughter’s cats were not . . . well, they behaved
like cats usually behave around Nancy.

Our 1.5 year old grandson Calder Ray
(Handfull, I call him. I’ll explain later – it’s not what you think)
simply accepted Nancy as she is without  curiosity or question.
Here we see him plopping himself down
in front of her in the restaurant’s waiting area,
talking to her about getting comfortable
by taking his shoes off.
Nancy talks a lot about shoes – her shoes.

We made it to North Carolina  around 2 in the morning
(way past Nancy’s bedtime),
and that could be why she didn’t understand
that I wanted her to
sit on the toilet not the bathtub.
She wasn’t hurt,
and I did manage to grab both of her arms,
breaking her fall
so she didn’t hit her head.
But goodness, what a way to
kick off Thanksgiving week.

Nancy, who loves her bling and doesn’t usually
share her necklaces with anybody,
seemed quite willing to let Handfull
explore his feminine side with her new necklaces.

We interrupt this blog post to share a shameless adoring Grandmother
(I think I want him to call me Sugar) moment.

We take Nancy with us (almost) everywhere – to see Santa,
to the Christmas Tree
Lighting at the Village Green,
to breakfast in Highlands.
(But not to the grocery store because
her mobility is such an issue,
and she is unable to operate
a motorized cart,
and not to Asheville on Wednesday
because it was a long day
filled with much movement.
She spent the day with our friend Debbie
where she could enjoy some quiet time.)

Handful spent a lot of his exploding
vocabulary on Nancy last week,
showing her the waterfall outside the door,
then climbing up to chat
with her about this and that.

Nancy wasn’t interested in putting puzzles together
or drawing – perhaps because
of the constant commotion – but she seemed
to have a big time, as my Daddy would say, anyway.

On the drive down the mountain from
North Carolina to Georgia Saturday night,
Nancy made a Real Big Mess in the backseat,
something she found quite funny,
even 24 hours later.
Perhaps it’s because it’s unexpected
or maybe it’s because she does it so seldom,
whatever the reason,
when Nancy laughs, everybody around her laughs.

After picking her up eight days ago, we deliver Nancy
back to her home in Florida yesterday,
and after a 72-hour nap,
we’ll begin making plans for Christmas.

~~~~~~~

Were we living in Germany in 1940,
Nancy most certainly would’ve received two red X’s,
been called a “useless eater”,
and declared “unworthy of life”.
What a drab world it would be without Nancy,
Brad, Robby, Rachel, Kevin
and my other friends with disabilities in it,
and that’s one reason I’ll be making
more blocks, quilts, Middlings, and Minis for The 70273 Project.
Join me?

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It’s Giving Tuesday & We Need Your Help

You’ve made blocks, pieced tops, quilted quilts. You continue to commemorate, and I am so deeply grateful to you for sharing your time, talent, energy, and materials to help commemorate the 70,273 people who were murdered. Perhaps you’ll be willing to help another way? Expenses for The 70273 Project have become too great for Andy and me to shoulder alone, so I’m hoping you’ll be willing to share this post and/or the Facebook fundraiser on your timeline and encourage your friends – especially those who profess to be non-stitchers but want to join in –  to contribute.

There are many expenses, and right now, our most pressing needs are shipping and storage.

The quilts of The 70273 Project have stories to tell –  stories of what unimaginable atrocities can occur when bullies are left unchecked. They also tell stories of inherited cloth used to make blocks; stories of lives touched by special needs students who taught their teachers so much; stories of loved ones with disabilities who bring such joy to the lives they touch; stories of people using a needle and thread for the very first time. The 70273 Project tells stories of people who are different contributing to a project that’s big enough to provide space for those differences in its unity of purpose. We are proving it can be done – that people who speak different languages; enjoy different likes and dislikes; have differing abilities can come together to commemorate those who died, celebrate and champion those who live, and educate all who will listen. In a time when the world needs kindness and compassion more than ever, we need money to ship the quilts around the world to tell their stories.

a few of the quilts – and that blue you see? don’t panic. it’s just the border of a pillowcase used to protect the quilts.

And we need space to store the growing collection of The 70273 Project quilts. When all is said and done, The Engineer figures we’ll have around 1200 quilts, and I have a teeny tiny little ole’ studio. I have a vision of one of those dry cleaning conveyor racks – you know, the kind that you push a button and the clothes (in this case, the quilts) move around the track till you locate the one you’re looking for –  as a way to store and retrieve the quilts. We need money to purchase the equipment and create a space to house it.

Tuesday, 11/28/2017 is #givingtuesday, and if you’re on Facebook – or you know folks who are – there are special opportunities that apply just for this one day allowing you to double the donations through matching funds.

Here’s some background info you might be interested in:
~ The 70273 Project, Inc. is recognized by the US government as a 501(c)(3) organization and is registered with Facebook as a non-profit.
~ On Giving Tuesday, 11/28/17, donations to nonprofits made through Facebook’s charitable giving tools will be matched up to $50,000 per nonprofit or $1,000 per fundraiser or donate button, until the $2 million in matching funds run out.
~ The matching begins at 8AM EST (5AM PST).
~ On Giving Tuesday, from 12 a.m. to 11:59 p.m., Facebook will forego the 5% fee it usually takes from donations made on Facebook, which means that 100% of all donations made through Facebook go to The 70273 Project.
~ You’ll see a banner on your fundraiser page after #GivingTuesday indicating the amount received in matched funds through your fundraiser.

Here’s how to set up a Facebook fundraiser on your timeline:
1. Visit  The 70273 Project Facebook Page.
2. At the bottom of the left sidebar, select “Fundraisers.”
3. Select the “+ Raise Money” button to the right of the word “Fundraisers.”
4. A pop-up box called “Create a Fundraiser” appears. Select “Get Started” at the bottom.
5. On the “Let’s Start With the Basics” page, make sure that “The 70273 Project, Inc.” is listed as who you’re raising money for.
6. Set the amount you wish to raise. (Note: Up to $1,000.00 USD will be matched.)
7. Assign an end date for your fundraiser. (Note: Only donations made on #GivingTuesday, 11/28/17 will be matched, and the matching continues until the $2 million allocated by the Gates Foundation has been depleted, so perhaps you’ll encourage your friends to donate early?)
8. Click “next”.
9. Title your fundraiser and tell why this matters to you.
10. Select “next.”
11. Choose a cover photo.
12. Select “create” and you’re off and running!

Peggy Thomas, Chief of Connections for The 70273 Project and creator of The 70273 Project Quilt #139 shown above,
created a fundraiser on her timeline. You’ll see it when you complete step 2. Feel free to use it as a template and make adjustments as desired.

Aaannnnddddd . . . if you don’t want to create a fundraiser for your Facebook timeline, you can tell your friends to simply visit The 70273 Project page, mash the “Donate” button, and contribute there.

Thank you for your continued support of The 70273 Project. I’ve got so much to tell y’all. There’s so much happening with The 70273 Project around the world – just wait till you hear. Tomorrow: Nancy and the rest of her Thanksgiving holiday then there are some new things coming up you’ll want to know about.

~~~~~~~

Other places to gather around The 70273 Project water cooler:

Shop with Amazon Smile and support The 70273 Project.

Subscribe to the blog (where all information is shared).

Join the English-speaking Facebook group – our e-campfire – where you can talk to other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Join the French-speaking Facebook group – our other e-campfire – where you can chat with other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Like the Facebook page where you can check in for frequent updates.

Follow the pinterest board for visual information.

Post using #the70273project on Instagram. (Please tag me, too, @whollyjeanne, so I don’t miss anything.)

And if you haven’t yet made some blocks, perhaps you’d like to put some cloth in your hands and join us.

Or maybe you’d like to gather friends and family, colleagues or students, club or guild members, etc. together and make a group quilt.

Or a Middling (art quilt) or a Mini (fabric postcard).

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