Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

& her barefoot heart

Author: jeanne (page 2 of 104)

Weeks 60-69 (4/3 – 5/11, 2017) Recap

The 70273 Project Quilt #10 brings home some new jewelry!

Good news: the reconstruction is as finished as it’s ever going to be, so I’ve dedicated myself to getting the blocks checked-in (among other things). You might want to fix yourself something to drink, cause we’re gonna’take this week by week, and there are a lotta’ weeks to cover . . .

My maternal grandmother’s paper scissors still sail right through paper like cutting through melted butter. I don’t know if they make ’em like this any more.

Week 60: 4/3-9, 2017 Highlights

  • The Engineer prepared and filed the income tax report.
  • Elaine Fields Smith and Pam Patterson had a booth at the Stephenville Native & Heirloom Plant Fair in Texas.
  • Received blocks from:
    • Kathryn Snow (GA/USA)
    • Deborah L. J. MacKinnon (WA/USA)
    • Sandra Readler (VT/USA)
    • Rebecca Hart (MO/USA)
    • Tree Kuhalich (SC/USA)
    • Sharon Brendle (WA/USA)
    • Vickie Turner (GA/USA)

Closeup of Quilt #10

Week 61: 4/10-16, 2017 Highlights

  • A post on the French Patchwork Guild blog
  • A post by Sandi Hazelwood on The Crafty Planner Blog
  • Computer meltdown (a.k.a. major angst)
  • Donations received from:
    • Frances Alford (financial – Thank you!)
    • Susan Burch (fabric – Thank you!)
  • Blocks received from:
    • Anon
    • Margaret Williams (GA/USA)
    • AnneVisart deBocarne (Belgium)

Week 62: 4/17-23, 2017 Highlights

  • Reconstruction from computer meltdown begins
  • Block drive at Fayette Senior Services; in Fayetteville, GA on 4/21
  • Received blocks from:
    • Tricia Stearns (GA/USA)
    • Sandy Snowden (England)
    • Betty Buford (UK)
    • Nancy Glynn (GA/USA)
    • Paula Anderson (GA/USA)</li>
    • Anne Rodriguez (GA/USA)
    • Carlotta Vagaro (GA/USA)

Making blocks in the Channel Islands, UK

Week 63: 4/24-30, 2017 Highlights

  • Sent Quilt #31 off to quilter Janet Eidem
  • Sent bundles of blocks to:
    • Janine Morrell
    • Francs Alford
  • Developed and posted new guidelines for registering a quilt with The 70273 Project
  • Another block drive in the Channel Islands, UK organized and facilitated by The 70273 Project Ambassadors Kim Monins and Gisele Therezien. Even the Parish Constable & Vicar showed up to participate!
  • Pam Patterson, Jiny, and Bob: met at post office for delightful (if short) visit and hand delivered blocks, fabric, and smiles.
  • Blocks received from:
    • Margaret Williams (GA/USA)
    • Kris Phillips (WA/USA)
    • Wendy Anton (England)
    • Pam Patterson (TX/USA)
    • Cathy Watkins (CAN)
    • Susan Burch and grands (GA/USA)

Screen shot from Instagram: Cera.Bee quilts #104 of The 70273 Project.

Week 64: 5/1-7, 2017 Highlights

  • Donation received from Teddy Pruett – Thank you, Sugar!
  • Sent bundles to:
    • Frances Alford, Quilt 151
    • Janine Morrell, Quilt 135
  • Blocks received from:
    • Rosemary Wellner and A Circle of Friends (NJ/USA)
    • Maria Conway (Argentina)
    • Marina Olivari (Argentina)
    • Beth Baray (NJ/USA)
    • Bev Betz (NJ/USA)
    • Betty Bryson (NJ/USA)
    • Pat Edwards (NJ/USA)
    • Pat Fox (NJ/USA)
    • Florence Grehlinger (NJ/USA)
    • Jean Hills (NJ/USA)
    • Arlene Schnaare (NJ/USA)
    • Dutch Wests (NJ/USA)
    • Linda White (NJ/USA)
    • Sherron Davis (NJ/USA)
    • Liz Johnson (NJ/USA)
    • Ann McCay (NJ/USA)
    • Annie O’Brien (NJ/USA)
    • Sandy Renninger (NJ/USA)
    • Linda White (NJ/USA)
    • Dianna Kelly (NJ/USA)
    • Sally Clark Massinio (NJ/USA)
    • Barbara Piquet (NJ/USA)
    • Cathy Skinner (NJ/USA)
    • Jeanne Hewell-Chambers (NC,GA/USA)
    • Deirdre McConathy (KY/USA)

The 70273 Project had a presence at the Traverse City, Michigan Human Rights Awareness Night thanks to 70273 Project Ambassador Suzanne McCarthy

Week 65: 5/8-14, 2017 Highlights

  • Suzanne McCarthy had a table at the Traverse City, MI Human Rights Commission event on 5/9, and some really good things have come from it.
  • A good post by Annie Labruyere on her blog
  • Spent the week at the beach with my family, so not home to receive blocks.

Week 66: 5/15-21, 2017 Highlights

  • Identification and reconstruction of information lost in computer meltdown still continues
  • The blog theme broke, so as a stop-gap measure, I spent time rearranging things so nothing is lost or unsightly, and in the meantime, I continue to work on the site makeover as time permits.
  • Blocks received from:
  • Quilt #3 hung in the Tree City Quilt Guild show in Gainesville, Florida.
  • Blocks received from:
    • Eileen Bradshaw (FL/USA)
    • Laver Austin (FL/USA)
    • Donna Lee (IL/USA)
    • Cindy Cavallo (NV/USA)
    • Anonymous
    • Debbie Burchell (CAN)
    • Glenna Kelley (FL/USA)
    • Jody Kelley (FL/USA)
    • Alta Paul (FL/USA)
    • Carolyn Katzoff (CO/USA) Collaborative blocks!*
    • Little Luna (VA/USA)

Special delivery from Tracey Selingo

Week 67: 5/22-28, 2017 Highlights

  • Designed shipping labels
  • Reconstruction continues. Sigh.
  • A good post by Rebecca Glotfelty
  • Blocks received from:
    • Margaret Williams (GA/USA)
    • Jan Stone (USA)
    • Tracey Selingo (PA/USA)
    • Dave Harman (UK)
    • Vanessa Black (GA)
    • Idalina DaSilva (CAN)

Week 68: 5/29-6/4, 2017 Highlights

  • A good post by Wendy Reed
  • A good post by Annie Labruyere
  • Blocks received from:
    • Andrea Schupbach (Germany)
    • Becky Lawyer (IN/USA)

Kim and Steve Monins from Jersey, Channel Islands, UK

Week 69: 6/5-11, 2017 Highlights

  • A good post by Jan Stone
  • Send a bundle of blocks to Patti Baymiller to piece
  • Delivered 5 bundles of blocks to Margaret Williams to piece and quilt
  • The 70273 Project Quilt #10 won herself some new jewelry (a.k.a. a Third Place Ribbon in the Group Quilts Category) at the East Cobb Quilt Guild Show.
  • The 70273 Project Ambassador Kim Monins and her husband, Steve came across the pond and paid us a visit. One night simply wasn’t long enough, though, even if they do talk funny. Hoping for more time next year.
  • Blocks received from:
    • Jean Gelsinger (MO/USA)
    • Long Beach Modern Quilt Guild (CA/USA)
    • Norma Hanlon (MN/USA)
    • Vina Missel (MI/USA)

There were many quilt numbers handed out and several quilts received.
I’ll tell you about those in future posts.

Okay, you might want to put your beverage down now
before you read any further, cause this is Big, y’all. This is Real Big . . .

Our current block count is – are you ready?

17,735

I’m not kidding – 17,735 people have been commemorated as of Sunday, 6/11/2017.
Y’all give yourselves a great big hug.
But wait . . . there’s more.

Block #17,568 made by Little Luna

I won’t name names, but some of you more mathematically inclined
may have already picked up on the fact that the magic 25% number
is 17,568, and now I present our block #17,568 made by Little Luna.
If her name sounds familiar, it’s because you’ve already met her.

Thank you to all of you who have stitched, who continue to stitch, and who will stitch.
To those who don’t want to stitch but do want to help commemorate,
perhaps you’d like to make a financial donation
by mashing the Donate button in the sidebar.
We have a lot of quilts to get home from around the world,
and other expenses are starting to mount,
so I promise we’ll put your money to good use.

We may have hit a milestone – a sizable milestone – and there are many more
to commemorate, so I hope this motivates you to recommit to
more stitching, to more telling, to more commemorating.
And hey, remember: June is Middling Month!

~~~~~~~

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Join.
Stitch.

Quilt 10 Gets New Jewelry

Hundred of quilts on display at the East Cobb Quilt Show June 8-10, 2017

The 70273 Project™ Quilt #10 on display at the East Cobb Quilt Guild Show 2017

The 70273 Project™ Quilt #10

The 70273 Project™ Quilt #10, detail

The 70273 Project™ Quilt #10, detail

The 70273 Project™ Quilt #10 with Margaret Williams, Piecer and Quilter

Today is the first time I’ve seen Quilt #10 since she was a mere bundle of blocks held together with a red ribbon. Margaret Williams finished piecing her, then submitted her for the East Cobb Quilt Show in Marietta, GA Our Quilt #10 was juried in (big honor), and The Engineer and I dropped by on the last day to see Margaret and #10.

Do you like her new jewelry? (And yes, the quilt part of the ribbon is hand pieced!) Drum roll, please: Our quilt #10 won a ribbon for Third Place in the Group Quilt category – another big honor!  Congratulations to Margaret Williams, Piecer, Quilter, and Finisher of Quilt #10 and to those who have blocks in Quilt #10:

Ada Hewell (US)
Adalee Beasley (US)
Andy Grimaldi (US)
Andrew R. Chambers (US)
Anonymous
Barbara Atwell (US)
Bev Wiedeman (US)
Bobbi Penniman (US)
Brenda Shimshick (US)
Caroline Rudisill (US)
Carolyn Katzoff (US)
Chase Hughes (US)
David S Leader (US)
Deborah L. J. MacKinnon (US)
Debra Steinmann (US)
Denniele Bohannen (US)
Elizabeth Belcher (US)
Emily May (Milly) Grice (FR)
Faye Cook (AUS)
Frances Holliday Alford (US)
Glenda Williams (AUS)
Hylke and Marjolein Lootens
Janet Eidem (US)
Janet Hartje (US)
Janice Foy (US)
Janine Morrell (US)
Jeanne Hewell-Chambers (US)
Jennifer Eastment (AUS)
Jennifer Lario Moya (AUS)
Jennifer Shimshick (US)
Kimberly Kuhns (US)
Kitty Sorgen (US)
Laurie Dunn (US)
Lee Durbin (US)
Linda Heron (CAN)
Linda Isaacs (US)
Linda Smith (US)
Lori East (US)
Margaret Williams (US)
Marsha Hardan (US)
Maryellen “Graz” Grysewicz (US)
Michelle Banton (US)
Michelle Hughes (US)
Mildred S (Millie) Long (US)
MJ Kinman (US)
Mona Masters (US)
Pat Gaska (US)
Pauline (AUS)
Robin Welsh (US)
Rosemary Claus-Gray (US)
Sarah Noelle Ballantine (US)
Sue Beermann (US)
Susan Getchell (US)
Susan Graham (US)
Susan Guild (US)
Susan Leader (US)
Susie Wheelis (US)

 

L to R: The Engineer (a.k.a. Andy), moi, Quilt #10, Margaret Williams, Susan Williams

Bonus: Not only did we get a personalized tour of the quilt show from Margaret, but we got to meet her delightful daughter, Susan.

L to R: The Engineer, Phoebe, Susan, and Margaret (in front)

And they got to meet our elderly Corgi, Phoebe, who was along for the ride because we are headed even further away on family business. It was a good and glorious day.

Notes: In the background, I’m doing a site makeover, creating galleries for each quilt. And this week’s update/recap post might be delayed. We’ll have to see how my time goes this afternoon. I’m at Mother’s house . . . which may or may not have something to do with it.

~~~~~~~

Other places to gather around The 70273 Project water cooler:

Shop with Amazon Smile and support The 70273 Project.

Subscribe to the blog (where all information is shared).

Join the English-speaking Facebook group – our e-campfire – where you can talk to other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Join the French-speaking Facebook group – our other e-campfire – where you can chat with other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Like the Facebook page where you can check in for frequent updates.

Get folks to help celebrate your birthday by making blocks and/or donating bucks.

Follow the pinterest board for visual information.

Post using #the70273project on Instagram. (Please tag me, too, @whollyjeanne, so I don’t miss anything.)

Tell your friends what you want for your birthday.

And if you haven’t yet made some blocks, perhaps you’d like to put some cloth in your hands and join us.

Or maybe you’d like to gather friends and family, colleagues or students, club or guild members, etc. together and make a group quilt.

Quilt 169, a Middling by Margaret Andrews

The 70273 Project Quilt 169, a Middling by Margaret Andrews. 16.5″ x 22.5″. May 2017.

The base material is the fabric that is used for soles of footed pjs. That reminds me of the security we have, but that was denied the 70,273 victims. The lace along the left border is from my bedroom curtains, and represents the security (again), and the comforts of home, for me, and for the perpetrators of the injustices committed against the victims. I also chose these materials, along with the red wool felt for the larger pairs of Xs for the textural interest, thinking of those with visual impairment. Both the columns of red Xs ending in ❌❌ outlined teardrops and the quilting represent the tears of those of us involved in The 70,273 Project, as well as tears of the family members over the loss of their loved ones.

This Middling contains 440 pairs of Xs, representing 440 lives lost in this atrocity.

~~~~~~~

Thank you, Margaret. Your beautiful stitched commemorations are made even more beautiful by your words.

June is Middling Month in The 70273 Project. Join us?

Weeks 52-59 (2/13/2017 – 4/2/2017) Recap

My constant companion during The Great Reconstruction, my Scratch Pad – receptacle for all notes about what I’ve done and what I need to do and what I might try next and other assorted detritus.

After spending many, many 14-16 hour days (and a few 24 hour days) reconstructing the information that was lost in the computer meltdown by sifting through emails, backed up files, paper files, handwritten notes, memory, blog posts, other people’s blog posts, and anywhere else I can think of to look for information, I’m ready to begin bringing us up to date . . . with emphasis on the word begin. There is still much to do, and I thank you for your continued patience. You may have assumed that I have grown tired of the project and had begun drifting away, but let me assure you that nothing could be further from the truth. My passion remains high and intact for The 70273
Project, and my gratitude continues to run deep and wide.

Like Janus, I look back with one eye and ahead with the other – and while I could do without the sometimes overwhelming stress of the to do list that tucks me in bed every night and greets me every morning, I am delighted beyond description that so many people have been commemorated and so many people are being commemorated. And shoot, I actually kinda’ enjoy the problem solving.

I do feel compelled to say, though, that there might very well be some adjustments made as Operation: Reconstruct continues and new old information is discovered. So now, without further ado, let’s see what happened in The 70273 Project between April 2 and the last time we recapped together on 2/12/2017 . . .

TRAVEL (in chronological order)

  • Denver, CO
  • Cashiers, NC
  • Fayetteville, GA
  • Berea, KY
  • Findlay, OH
  • Lebanon, KY
  • Fayetteville, GA
  • Cashiers, NC
  • Amicalola Falls, GA
  • Cashiers, NC
  • Peachtree City, GA
  • Cashiers, NC
  • Peachtree City, GA
  • Denver, CO

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • babysitting
  • The Best Birthday Party EVAH- Thank you, Chloe Grice and members of The 70273 Project Tribe! I’ve never experienced anything like it. It was wonderful, marvelous, humbling, and very much appreciated.
  • the flu that laid me flat and would not end
  • spent many days and weeks moving our daughter
  • coughed our way into Berea, KY where we spent the night and had breakfast at Boone Tavern and Inn
  • enjoyed Findlay, Ohio, thanks to our personal guide, Tanya Weising-Pike, Director of Education at Blanchard Valley Center
  • delivered Quilt #5 to Blanchard Valley Center
  • met and fell in love with the wonderful teachers, parents, and staff at Blanchard Valley; the Mayor of Findlay; and Randy Roberts of The Findlay Courier who let me use his photo, saying “I’ve got to tell you: I am very impressed with the heart of this project.”
  • coughed our way back to Fayetteville, rested for a day, then enjoyed a day of making blocks with my Tiger Girls (women I graduated from high school with). I’m gonna’ introduce you in a blog post coming soon.
  • joined Peggy Thomas and Patty Guillick at The 70273 Project booth at Joyce Beverly’s Fayette Woman LIVE where many, many, many blocks were made. I can’t wait to tell you about it, and I will . . . in a blog post coming soon.
  • made blocks with the Friendship Circle at the Fayetteville First United Methodist Church. You guessed it – there’s a post coming soon to a blog near you.
  • spoke to The Writer’s High Retreat, kicking things off on Friday night, where I met some marvelously interesting  and interested folks.
  • answered the good questions of Elodie Redoulèz for an article she was writing about The 70273 Project for the Bailiwick Express in the Jersey, Channel Islands, UK.
  • closed this time period out the way it began: babysitting in Denver.

QUILT NUMBERS ASSIGNED

  • 6 quilt numbers to Katell Renon in France (73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78)

BUNDLES SENT

  • Kitty Sorgen (Quilt #31). It’s now being quilted by Janet Eidem.
  • Jackie Batman (Quilt #56)
  • Kellye Rose ( #62, #63, and #64)
  • Sharleen Jespersen (Quilt #103)
  • Sarah Jespersen Lauzon (Quilt #104)
  • Alejandrina Pattin (Quilt #105)
  • Sandy Martin and the Caribou Quilters (Quilt #65)

QUILTS RECEIVED

The 70273 Project Quilt 102, a Middling made by Debra Steinmann.

#102, a Middling created by Debra Steinmann (GA/USA) that’s now on display at Intown Quilters in Decatur, GA. I also designed materials for the shop to hand out. If you need me to design materials for you to give others, let me know. Once upon a life chapter, I was a freelance graphic designer. It’s something I enjoy doing.

The 70273 Project Quilt 138. Pieced by Kathleen Carfagno, Quilted by Jessica Skultey.

and the beautiful quilt top now known as Quilt #138 made by Kathleen K Carfagno (NJ/USA) and currently being quilted by Jessica Skultey (NJ/USA).

BLOCKS RECEIVED

  • Beth Brennan (IL/USA)
  • Debra Woods (MO/USA)
  • Betty Jo Oliver (KY/USA)
  • Kayos Huff (aged 5, MO/USA)
  • Market Dwyer (MN/USA)
  • Celine Henries (France)
  • Jane Cunningham (New Zealand)
  • Peggy Lowrie (TX/USA)
  • Jane Riddell (GA/USA)
  • Jean Fischer (GA/USA)
  • Dianna Moore (GA/USA)
  • Linda King Smith (GA/USA)
  • Jeanne Hewell Chambers (GA,NC/USA)
  • Joan Dumas Hughey (GA/USA)
  • Elender Ballard (GA/USA)
  • Joan McKnight (Canada)
  • Faye Cook (AUS)
  • Kevin Thomas (GA/USA)
  • Olivia Ries (GA/USA)
  • Peggy Thomas (GA/USA)
  • Bisa Batten Lewis (GA/USA
  • Connie Fox (GA/USA)
  • FeFe Handy (GA/USA)
  • Nicole Simmons (GA/USA)
  • Nancy Jaworski (GA/USA)
  • Jennifer Harper (GA/USA)
  • Maggie Laton (GA/USA)
  • Jill Prouty (GA/USA)
  • Ellie White-Stevens (GA/USA)
  • Stephanie Washington (GA/USA)
  • Carla Wong McMillian (GA/USA)
  • Jamie Smith (GA/USA)
  • Carmen Johnson (GA/USA)
  • Diana M Lovell (GA/USA)
  • Julie Irby/Camryn Johnson (GA/USA)
  • Cathy Jackson (GA/USA)
  • Paulette Bass (GA/USA)
  • Kathy Bohannon (GA/USA)
  • Shelly Gable (GA/USA)
  • Delores Epps (GA/USA)
  • Jean Peck (GA/USA)
  • Jennifer Harper (GA/USA)
  • Elisa Marcus Price (GA/USA)
  • Melodie Parks (GA/USA)
  • Fairy L. Wortham (GA/USA)
  • Jackie Pope (GA/USA)
  • Carrie Franklin (WA/USA)
  • Melodie Parks (GA/USA)
  • Jackie Pope (GA/USA)
  • Loose Threads (MN.USA)
  • Deborah L. J. McKinnon and members of the Kingston/North Kitsap Rotary Club (WA/USA)
  • Wendy Caton Reed (ME/USA)
  • Diane Dresden (VA/USA)
  • Gail Georgia (ID/USA)
  • Polly Davis (USA)
  • Dottie Gray (GA/USA)
  • Bonnie Giglio (GA/USA)
  • Carly Burch (GA/USA)
  • Janet Baileys (GA/USA)
  • Charlotte McAdams (GA/USA)
  • Marilyn Harris (GA/USA)
  • Amanda (Nikki) Neal (GA/USA)
  • Tami Kemberling (GA/USA)
  • Susan Burch (GA/USA)
  • Roselyn Roberts (GA/USA)
  • Clara Martin (GA/USA)
  • Carolyn McKinley (GA/USA)
  • Alida Palmisano (MD/USA)
  • Brigid Martin (GA/USA)
  • Jean Foglein (Canada)
  • Marlies (Belgium)
  • Karlijn Lecluyse (Belgium)
  • the 99 commemorations in Quilt 102
  • the 62 commemorations in Quilt 138

And now, what you’ve all been waiting for: the block count as of 4/2/2017: 9099 (and growing)!

(Bear with me as I makeover the web site in the background of the reconstruction . . . which means that some things – oh, like the block counter chart, for example –  might not be where you remember them or where they’re supposed to be or where you will find them next week.)

The Engineer

 

He fetches the mail,

sets up (and takes down) tables,

and quilt stands.

He develops hanging systems for the round In Our Own Language 3,
so it can be a backdrop for a block drive.

He addresses postcards,

and helps create holiday cards.

He makes blocks,

he makes more blocks,

and he prepares materials so others can make blocks
for The 70273 Project.

When we travel, he takes a turn carrying the backpack.

and stops (or at least slows down) while I snap photos on our walks,

and pulls over to the side of the road to let me hop out
and snap photos of things I find captivating.

When the big projects I juggle feel like a quagmire
or an imminent implosion,
he doesn’t just tell me to take a break,
he takes me out to play

or on a date to the Georgia Tech bookstore
(where he looks at Science & Technology
while I browse the poetry section, you’ll note).

He is the light at the end of my tunnel,
The Man behind The 70273 Project,

and were I a cat,
this is how I would spend our evenings
because I adore this man.
I absolutely, thoroughly, flat-out adore him.

Happy birthday to The Engineer.

~~~

Why yes, he was born one day after Nancy
. . . and a few years earlier.

Time for Nancy to Blow Out the Candles Again!

It’s that time of year again – the day for Nancy to blow out the candles on her cake! If you’ve poked around this blog, you know who Nancy is, and if you’re at all familiar with The 70273 Project, you know that I was stitching Nancy’s drawings when The Idea came and whispered to the ears of my heart. Since Nancy is a woman of few words, I think we’ll celebrate today in photos.  Click on the photos and get to know Nancy, if you’re a mind to. I’ll be surprised if you don’t leave this post smiling and feeling a little lighter. Nancy does that for folks.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy birthday, Nancy. May you have many, many, many more.

~~~

P.S. I want y’all to know that when I called to order flowers for our Nancy, the owner of the shop told me about her brother who is 1 year older than Nancy, disabled, and lives right down the street from her. Can we say “small world” one more time?!

June: Middling Month

The 70273 Project Quilt 52, a Middling made by Margaret Williams, 110 people commemorated

Y’all probably remember that on February 1, 2017, I introduced The 70273 Project Middling Quilts, and now – today, June 1, 2017 – I’m declaring June as Middling Month.

The 70273 Project Quilt 134, a Middling by Maria Conway. This is the Middling in progress. I’ll show you the finished Middling soon.

If you’ve been thinking about making a Middling, this is a good time to get started. If you’ve been meaning to get that Middling finished, this is a good time to get it finished. If you’re looking for a goal to sink your needle into, this is a good time to decide how many Middlings you want to make and thread your needle. Me, I’m going to make at least two in addition to the 3 I’ve already made. (Truth: I’d love to make one a week – and while I have the fantasy life to do it, I’m trying to be more realistic, so I’ll say 2.) (And hope for more.)

The 70273 Project Tribe Member, Piecer, and Quilter Sharlene Jespersen, stands with The 70273 Project Quilt 1 at QuiltCon in Savannah, February 2017.

Now let’s be clear: this does not mean that Middlings are replacing blocks – not at all, far from it, never gonna’ happen. If you want to keep stitching the original blocks, please do. If you want to receive a bundle (or more!) of blocks to piece and quilt – either or both – please let me know. I have a studio filled with blocks just waiting to be pieced and quilted, and they’d love to come spend the summer with you.

The 70273 Project Quilt 44 made by the Can’canettes in Castres, France

Or if you’re vacationing with family or attending camp or retreats with friends, maybe y’all would like to make a group quilt. That’d be awesome.

The 70273 Project Quilt 34, a Long Skinny made by Gisele Therezien in Jersey, Channel Islands UK

The 70273 Project Quilt 125, a Long Skinny made by Margaret Jackson and her family in the UK

And if you’re inclined to make a Long Skinny, by all means do it, Sugar. I’d love to have more Long Skinnies.

Though important, guidelines for Middlings are kept to a minimum, and you can click right this way to read more about them.

Middlings are now my Am Ex – I never leave home without them. Why do I love them so? Oh, just let me count the ways . . .
~ They fit quite nicely in the smallest of bags
~ It’s easy to pull them out and stitch on them even in the smallest, tightest spaces,
~ In this small piece of cloth there’s plenty of room to spread your creative wings
~ You can commemorate as many people as you like.
Are you convinced? (Say Yes.)

I’ll also be profiling some astoundingly moving Middlings here, so be sure to check back often. Whatever you’re stitching, these Middlings will be kindling to your creative fire, I promise you that. They are astonishing and deeply moving.

How many Middlings do you think we can get made in June? If you’re joining in as a June Middler, leave a comment here on the blog; in the Facebook group or on the Facebook page and let us know. And be sure to send photos as you stitch along to whet our appetite and so we can cheer you on.

Stitch on, y’all, and hey, thanks for helping commemorate these special folks.

You Just Never Know . . .

The 70273 Project Quilt 34, a Long Skinny made by Gisele Therezien from Jersey, Channel Islands, UK

Did your mama always tell you to wear clean underwear so you wouldn’t bring disgrace to the family should you be in an accident and be caught wearing dirty underwear? Well, this story isn’t about that – it’s more about 6 degrees of separation – but I was thinking about that so I wrote it down. Now you a little peephole into the way my brain works these days as I tend to all sorts of big 70273 projects that I’m behind on.

But I digress.

March was filled with amazingly wonderful people and places as I traveled to present quilts, make blocks, and speak with amazingly wonderful people about The 70273 Project. Friday, March 17 found me standing in front of a group of wicked good writers at The Writers High Retreat founded by my friend Mari Ann Stephanelli. One of the delightful women I met that night is Kyle Ann Robertson, and let me tell y’all, it didn’t take me long to realize that she is a real dynamo of a woman who can tell a story like you wouldn’t believe.

Now Kyle Ann lives in Sarasota, and last week I received a facebook message from her saying that she was recently at The Four Pillars in San Marco’s Circle when  she heard a woman’s poem that began with the line “In AWARENESS lies answers.”

That particular line stuck with Kyle Ann like spinach on a front tooth, so later that day, when she happened by the Sarasota library to return a book and spied some quilters there, I want y’all to know she just walked right up to them and told them about The 70273 Project.

She gave me Lenore’s name, saying she thought I might be hearing from her and others because they sure did seem interested. And hearing from them I have been. I’d already received a friend request from Lenore, along with a request to join The 70273 Project Campfire Facebook group.

And listen to this, y’all: today I received a message on the blog from Nan who said “It was the strangest thing. We were meeting in the Sarasota Library when this woman came in to return a book, saw us, and took center stage to tell us about your project.” Nan goes on to say that she’s working with a local reporter to get something in the papers there, and that there are already several groups in the area working on blocks.

And that’s not all.

Nan lives in a place where my in-laws lived for years and years, and by “place”, I mean subdivision. Yes, she lives in the very subdivision my in-laws called home for I don’t know how long. Shoot, she could even be living in their house, for all we know. We just never know, do we? When we follow our Bones and step up to speak to a group of strangers who happen to be quilting, and tell them about The 70273 Project, who knows where our words will lead? Who knows how many will follow the breadcrumbs trail? I know one thing, though: you can bet your bottom dollar it’s no coincidence.

Today, in the wake of Nan’s email, I’ve been sending silent Thank you’s to Kyle Ann, to Lenore, to Nan, to those who are making blocks, to the Sweet Spirit of Surprise, and to Mama C and Mr. C, parents to Nancy and The Engineer. Not only do I miss them and enjoy the memories we made together, I never, ever forget that were it not for them . . .

there would no The Engineer in my life, and without The Engineer . . .

there would be no Nancy in my life, and without Nancy . . .

In Our Own Language 3, detail

. . . I would have nothing to stitch, and with nothing to stitch, I might’ve missed the documentary in January 2016, and without the documentary, I wouldn’t have had the pleasure and the honor of meeting y’all as we work together to commemorate these 70,273 people.

Can y’all believe it? It really is a small world after all.

~~///~~

Now when you go out there and tell people about The 70273 Project and they ask for more information, direct them here:

Other places to gather around The 70273 Project water cooler:

Shop with Amazon Smile and support The 70273 Project.

Subscribe to the blog (where all information is shared).

Join the English-speaking Facebook group – our e-campfire – where you can talk to other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Join the French-speaking Facebook group – our other e-campfire – where you can chat with other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Like the Facebook page where you can check in for frequent updates.

Get folks to help celebrate your birthday by making blocks and/or donating bucks.

Follow the pinterest board for visual information.

Post using #the70273project on Instagram. (Please tag me, too, @whollyjeanne, so I don’t miss anything.)

Tell your friends what you want for your birthday.

And if you haven’t yet made some blocks, perhaps you’d like to put some cloth in your hands and join us.

Or maybe you’d like to gather friends and family, colleagues or students, club or guild members, etc. together and make a group quilt.

Backstage Pass: Checking Blocks In

From the get-go, I’ve numbered the blocks, tagging them and logging them in. At first, I wrote the block number on a small strip of fabric (drawing a little line under the last digit in the number because numbers like 698 are easy to misread if you don’t know which end is up.) and used a safety pin to attach it to the block. Can we say time consuming? Then one day The Engineer walked in, watched for a few minutes, and suggested I find a gizmo like they use to attach price tags to clothing. A visit to a nearby quilting store yielded just such a gizmo that saved time, but writing the block number on fabric still ate up some clock, so I wrote the numbers on paper then began typing out the numbers, spending a lot of time figuring out the spacing so that once I cut off the edges, I could make one horizontal cut then snip off each number. I attached these with the gizmo, and it was good – especially once I asked if somebody would do that and not one, not two, but three volunteers – Debbie Burchell, Vonnie Grant, and Janet Hickey – raised their digital hands and took this chore over.

That worked well for several months, then I discovered how well painter’s tape sticks to fabric, so I began using a red marker to write the block numbers on the back of blocks with X’s dark enough and wide enough to keep the ink from showing through, and write the number on painter’s tape and stick it to the back of other blocks with smaller red X’s.

In the beginning I scanned every block as part of the cataloguing system. (Actually, in the very beginning I took photos of every block, moving the scanner in only when I figured it would shave some time off the cataloguing process.)

Let me say that again: in the beginning I scanned EVERY block. Every. Single. Block. (imagine me thunking myself upside the head) before entering all the information into a database, and by “all the information”, I mean the information for every block. Every. Single. Block.

I want y’all to know that Diane Dresdner has commemorated more than 500 people so far! I love her.

Nowadays I scan blocks randomly, making notes on the Provenance Forms, then scan the Provenance Form, titling the file with the block numbers (using the word in its plural form so that the files will fall in line by block number. The singular form – block – is used to title files of photos or stories to go with specific photos.), week received, envelope number (it’s a purposeful quirk of mine), and the Maker’s name. One day, when I’m looking for something to do, I’ll enter all the information on the Provenance Forms into a database.

Every envelope is labeled by the week it was received, bagged, then every bag is labeled by week of envelopes and boxes it contains.

Current day tagging kit. It goes with me everywhere. I attach a strip of tape to the inside of the bag telling me which block # and envelope # to start with when I begin another cataloguing session.

Last week, for the first time since the first week in February, I unpacked my suitcase and stored it away. In the past several months, whenever we made a quick run up to the mountain to check on the bees and fetch the mail, I divided the mail into weeks, put each week’s mail in a separate bag, then schlepped it back down the mountain where I worked on checking blocks in as time allowed. Not only are the envelopes labeled by the week number received, I label the bag by the week number because a girl like me can never have too many ways to check, double check, and triple check herself. Checks and balances are at the heart of every one of my systems, and I’ve used them more than once. You know I have.

When the blocks have been numbered and the Provenance Form scanned, the blocks are put into a holding box where they will stay until its time to bundle them to send to Piecers. I’ll tell you that part of the system later.

Now listen, y’all remember how my computer had a meltdown several weeks ago? Well, it’s taken a good, long while to figure out what information was lost by sifting through emails, social media posts, and journal entries to reconstruct it. (Remember what I said about ways to check, double check, and triple check things?) I hope I’m not being overly optimistic when I say give me another 2 days, and I think I’ll have Humpty Dumpty put back together again and we’ll get back to our Sunday recap posts and a whole bunch of other goodness.

~~~~~~~

Other places to gather around The 70273 Project water cooler:

Shop with Amazon Smile and support The 70273 Project.

Subscribe to the blog (where all information is shared).

Join the English-speaking Facebook group – our e-campfire – where you can talk to other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Join the French-speaking Facebook group – our other e-campfire – where you can chat with other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Like the Facebook page where you can check in for frequent updates.

Get folks to help celebrate your birthday by making blocks and/or donating bucks.

Follow the pinterest board for visual information.

Post using #the70273project on Instagram. (Please tag me, too, @whollyjeanne, so I don’t miss anything.)

Tell your friends what you want for your birthday.

And if you haven’t yet made some blocks, perhaps you’d like to put some cloth in your hands and join us.

Or maybe you’d like to gather friends and family, colleagues or students, club or guild members, etc. together and make a group quilt.

Quilts 44 and 45 Stitched in France

Dear Jeanne,
Not far from Lacaze, where 35 quilts will be displayed for the Project 70273 on June,25th, a group of ladies worked hard to take part in it. Here is their story, enjoy!
Katell

 We are a group of 14 happy quilters, gathering every Tuesday afternoon, some of us for more than 10 years. We used to have the name of our room, called Les Salvages, indeed we rescue sometimes old fabrics! But our new name, les Can’canettes, is a joke with the French name for bobbin (canette) and French cancan. We live near the birth place of the famous painter Toulouse-Lautrec!


We live in a delightful small town called Castres, famous for their houses along the river l’Agout. Last year we made a collective quilt showing this idyllic scene. It is now displayed in the airport Castres-Mazamet.

 We heard about the Project 70273 on Katell’s blog La Ruche des Quilteuses and decided to take part in it. All volunteers decided first to make each 7 blocks, then we were encouraged to make them in two quilts for the exhibition in Lacaze, on June, 25th, 40 minutes away from Castres.

The first one is made of 46 blocks and shows two crosses made of crosses. 8 persons took part in it and one person pieced and quilted it but wishes to remain anonymous. Thank you!

This quilt has Number 44, shows 46 blocks, and measures 1.45 m x 1.38 m.

 The second one is more traditional and shows 56 blocks. Ten persons took part in it and Jo made the top and quilting. It is Number 45 and is 1.12 m x 1.29 m.

 

To sum up our participation, 13 quilters took part in the Project 70273: Yvette DURAND, Carole GIOVANOLLA, Béatrice TAVIRRE, Claudine BIZE, Colette BOUISSET, Dominique MEDARD, Jo DROUET and 6 wish to be anonymous. Our two quilts are here for 102 victims.

 We will be so happy and honored to meet Jeanne HEWELL – CHAMBERS on June 25th in Lacaze! We are very proud to have contributed to this tremendous project.

Jo Drouet

~~~~~~~

Hello Katell, Jo, Yvette, Carole, Beatrice, Claudine, Colette, Dominique, and others! What a fun group you must be – the name of your group makes me chuckle aloud – and how I would love to sit with you stitching on rescued fabric (my favorite). 102 more people are now commemorated thanks to your generous efforts. I am counting down the days till I stand beside you and gaze upon these quilts from your hands and hearts. It will be a fine day, a very fine day. (And it won’t be long now!) Merci beaucoup.

Love,
Jeanne

~~~~~~~

Other places to gather around The 70273 Project water cooler:

Shop with Amazon Smile and support The 70273 Project.

Subscribe to the blog (where all information is shared).

Join the English-speaking Facebook group – our e-campfire – where you can talk to other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Join the French-speaking Facebook group – our other e-campfire – where you can chat with other members of The 70273 Project Tribe.

Like the Facebook page where you can check in for frequent updates.

Get folks to help celebrate your birthday by making blocks and/or donating bucks.

Follow the pinterest board for visual information.

Post using #the70273project on Instagram. (Please tag me, too, @whollyjeanne, so I don’t miss anything.)

Tell your friends what you want for your birthday.

And if you haven’t yet made some blocks, perhaps you’d like to put some cloth in your hands and join us.

Or maybe you’d like to gather friends and family, colleagues or students, club or guild members, etc. together and make a group quilt.

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