Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

& her barefoot heart

Search results: "middling" (page 1 of 3)

Quilt #187, a Middling made by Laurie Dunn

The 70273 Project Quilt #187, a Middling made by Laurie Dunn

Laurie writes . . .

“What is a middling?”  I asked. “made from fat quarter size fabric.” (Really–those little bundles tied up at the fabric store unfold?)   A small quilt. Someone shared a picture.  I was getting it. Remember I am not a quilter.  

Quilt #187, a Middling by Laurie Dunn

I cut fabric the required size plus a half inch. I grabbed my embroidery hoop and the spool of red sewing thread I had been using and began to stitch pairs of X’s. Always in pairs. I absent-mindedly follow the curve of the hoop. When it got awkward, I moved the hoop. Continued and removed the hoop. Hmmmm. Looks like a heart, sort of. So I tried to continue the heart idea. XX of various stitches, various sizes. My January project.

I took my thread and my hoop to visit my 91 year old Dad. “Are you going to finish it by Valentine’s Day?” he asked as I was still working on it after his February 3rd birthday. A new deadline.

Jeanne asked me how it felt to make a Middling. I started with trepidation. I am not a quilter. This is taking a lot of time if it is not right. I set it aside, picked it up, took it to work when I watched the grandkids.

Quilt #187, a Middling made by Laurie Dunn

One of the Monthly Mixer challenges was “a picture of the smallest pair of XX you can find.” That somehow gave me the freedom to make very small XX pairs. And that led me to thinking of small individuals – how young were the lives we are remembering. Some of the individuals I work with are adults but are of very small stature for their age. Some of my pairs were prickly, some stout. My pairs marched and meandered . . . is that how “our” individuals entered the gas chambers?

Quilt #187, a Middling by Laurie Dunn

When I got my decidedly wonky heart shape finished, I counted 200 pairs. Then I added 14 more larger ones from fabric – just because that is how many fit. I cut the back and the filling (an old felted waterbed pad – my mother-in-law always used old blankets for batting in her quilts.) I stitched around the edges – pillow case style – a term I learned form fellow participants in The 70273 Project. My plan had been to machine stitch between the rows of pairs of X’s. Around the inside of the heart I went. Then the inside of the inside row. I could not do more, the rows seemed too close together. I sent a picture to Chloe Grice asking if she thought it was “right”. She said to post it, so I did, and y’all (another term I’m learning from this group!), y’all hit “like”. No one said to add more quilting.

Laurie Dunn and Quilt #187, a Middling

Took it to show my dad. He got a big grin. Later on that evening, he suddenly said, “Don’t do any more quilting.” I have always tried to obey my dad.

I keep looking at it, moving it from place to place. I still need to put a sleeve on the back. It is very much like a baby blanket, like a baby I’m not ready to send into the world quite yet.

~~~~~~~

Laurie, your Middling and your words are tender and quite touching. I am moved by the fact that as you say, you are not a quilter, and yet you feel so deeply about the people you work with and the people we commemorate that you simply cut the fabric, thread the needle, and start. You may  have been working on it since January, but you’ll finish it in June, which as you know, is Middling Month! Please hug your dad for me next time you see him, and tell him what I always ask you to tell him: that I thank him for his service and for the daughter who is now my friend.

Quilt #179, a Middling Made by Cindy Cavallo

The 70,273 Project Quilt #179 made by Cindy Cavallo

Dear Jeanne,

My name is Cindy Cavallo. I am a lifetime Reno, Nevada resident. I retired from University of Nevada-Reno in December of 2012, where I was an instructor of Interior Design for 11.5 years. I taught Residential Design, Housing, and Textiles, with Textiles being my first love. I learned of The 70,273 Project from my Quilt Guild – Truckee Meadows Quilters. I’ve been quilting on and off for the last 25 years. I’ve made many quilts, tried many blocks, and left many project unfinished out of lack of importance. I’ve wanted to “quilt with a purpose” for several years now, and The 70,273 Project seemed to speak straight to my heart!

One of the most moving experiences of my life was a trip to the National Holocaust Museum in Washington, D. C. I’m honored to be a part of this amazing movement – the remembrance of those whose lives were randomly cut so short. I think of what the world truly lost and imagine if the Steven Hawkings, Helen Kellers, the FDRs and Kim Peeks of the world were taken early – where would the world be today without their gifts?

The 70,273 Project Quilt #179, detail

My Middling (18.5″ x 22″) was made and finished in April of 2017 with fabrics from my stash. In my twenties I traveled to Europe. I collected fabrics and ribbons from France and Belgium, those are included in my quilt. The backing and some ribbon are from my mother’s collection. She passed at the age of 95 in 2015, and working with her things was a sweet reminder of her and learning to sew as a youngster on her old Singer! I wanted to use some traditional techniques (flying geese) and modern advancements of dye cutting fonts to recognize individuals. 33 lives are commemorated in all – each with love and the deepest respect.  

The 70,273 Project Quilt #179, detail

I honor family and friends who suffer from physical and mental diseases and realize they, too, would have most likely received the dreaded XX. Their love and compassion, not to mention individual talents, would have been taken from us. The very thought! Education is the only remedy for such atrocities. I want everyone to remember the past so we don’t repeat this mistake made by calloused individuals. I thank you for taking on the creation, responsibility, and the monumental task of The 70,273 Project. 

Kindest regards,

Cindy

~~~~~~~

Cindy, thank your beautiful Middling and for your touching words. I can’t tell you how many time a day I think what a big empty hole would be in my life were there no Nancy. It’s unfathomable, really. I look forward to our paths crossing in person one day so I can call you Sugar to your face. xo

~~~~~~~

Would you like to make a Middling?
Would you like to make blocks?
Would you like to Piece a top or Quilt a quilt or both? Just let me know.

Quilt 169, a Middling by Margaret Andrews

The 70273 Project Quilt 169, a Middling by Margaret Andrews. 16.5″ x 22.5″. May 2017.

The base material is the fabric that is used for soles of footed pjs. That reminds me of the security we have, but that was denied the 70,273 victims. The lace along the left border is from my bedroom curtains, and represents the security (again), and the comforts of home, for me, and for the perpetrators of the injustices committed against the victims. I also chose these materials, along with the red wool felt for the larger pairs of Xs for the textural interest, thinking of those with visual impairment. Both the columns of red Xs ending in ❌❌ outlined teardrops and the quilting represent the tears of those of us involved in The 70,273 Project, as well as tears of the family members over the loss of their loved ones.

This Middling contains 440 pairs of Xs, representing 440 lives lost in this atrocity.

~~~~~~~

Thank you, Margaret. Your beautiful stitched commemorations are made even more beautiful by your words.

June is Middling Month in The 70273 Project. Join us?

June: Middling Month

The 70273 Project Quilt 52, a Middling made by Margaret Williams, 110 people commemorated

Y’all probably remember that on February 1, 2017, I introduced The 70273 Project Middling Quilts, and now – today, June 1, 2017 – I’m declaring June as Middling Month.

The 70273 Project Quilt 134, a Middling by Maria Conway. This is the Middling in progress. I’ll show you the finished Middling soon.

If you’ve been thinking about making a Middling, this is a good time to get started. If you’ve been meaning to get that Middling finished, this is a good time to get it finished. If you’re looking for a goal to sink your needle into, this is a good time to decide how many Middlings you want to make and thread your needle. Me, I’m going to make at least two in addition to the 3 I’ve already made. (Truth: I’d love to make one a week – and while I have the fantasy life to do it, I’m trying to be more realistic, so I’ll say 2.) (And hope for more.)

The 70273 Project Tribe Member, Piecer, and Quilter Sharlene Jespersen, stands with The 70273 Project Quilt 1 at QuiltCon in Savannah, February 2017.

Now let’s be clear: this does not mean that Middlings are replacing blocks – not at all, far from it, never gonna’ happen. If you want to keep stitching the original blocks, please do. If you want to receive a bundle (or more!) of blocks to piece and quilt – either or both – please let me know. I have a studio filled with blocks just waiting to be pieced and quilted, and they’d love to come spend the summer with you.

The 70273 Project Quilt 44 made by the Can’canettes in Castres, France

Or if you’re vacationing with family or attending camp or retreats with friends, maybe y’all would like to make a group quilt. That’d be awesome.

The 70273 Project Quilt 34, a Long Skinny made by Gisele Therezien in Jersey, Channel Islands UK

The 70273 Project Quilt 125, a Long Skinny made by Margaret Jackson and her family in the UK

And if you’re inclined to make a Long Skinny, by all means do it, Sugar. I’d love to have more Long Skinnies.

Though important, guidelines for Middlings are kept to a minimum, and you can click right this way to read more about them.

Middlings are now my Am Ex – I never leave home without them. Why do I love them so? Oh, just let me count the ways . . .
~ They fit quite nicely in the smallest of bags
~ It’s easy to pull them out and stitch on them even in the smallest, tightest spaces,
~ In this small piece of cloth there’s plenty of room to spread your creative wings
~ You can commemorate as many people as you like.
Are you convinced? (Say Yes.)

I’ll also be profiling some astoundingly moving Middlings here, so be sure to check back often. Whatever you’re stitching, these Middlings will be kindling to your creative fire, I promise you that. They are astonishing and deeply moving.

How many Middlings do you think we can get made in June? If you’re joining in as a June Middler, leave a comment here on the blog; in the Facebook group or on the Facebook page and let us know. And be sure to send photos as you stitch along to whet our appetite and so we can cheer you on.

Stitch on, y’all, and hey, thanks for helping commemorate these special folks.

A New Way To Make Blocks and Quilts: Middlings

Remember how I’ve always said that I want quilts of all sizes so we can fit into any venue that will have us? Remember how I’ve always said I want our displays to be a feast for the senses?
Remember how I’ve always said I want viewers to feel the full impact when viewing The 70273 Project quilts?

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project made by Margaret Williams

Well now, thanks to an idea seed planted by Lynn Krawczyk, I’m opening up a new way to make not just blocks, but quilts for The 70273 Project. It’s a whole new category of quilts called Middlings, and I asked a few elves to stitch up some to give you some ideas.

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project Made by Margaret Williams (GA/USA)

Most guidelines remain in place: background is white, pairs of red X’s, no writing or other embellishments to distract from the red X’s, but then . . . Middlings are quilts that measure 18″ x 22″ (46 cm x 56 cm) (yes, fat quarter size) when finished, and, as long as you remember the basics, you are free to get as creative as you want.

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project made by Margaret Williams (GA/USA)

And are you ready for this? You can also commemorate many more people because as long as the red X’s are presented as easily recognizable pairs, you can commemorate as many people as desired in one Middling quilt. In the quilt above, there are 119 pairs of red X’s which means that Margaret made 119 blocks which means that she commemorated 119 people. Yes, that’s right: each pair of red X’s counts as one block. I’m not kidding.

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project Made by Margaret Williams (GA/USA)

Guidelines for Middlings:
~ Background fabric must be white (representing the medical records, the only information assessing physicians used to make their life and death decisions).
~ Red X’s MUST be presented as easily recognizable pairs because each pair of red X’s represents one person.
~ Get as creative as you like and put as many red X’s as desired on the Middling, just remember to place the red X’s so that they are easily identifiable as pairs.
~ An amended Provenance Form includes a space for you to tell me how many pairs of red X’s are on your Middling. We’re gonna’ operate on the honor system, and I’m sure you can figure out why.
~ Finished size of Middlings is about 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm).
~ Bindings or facings (finished edges) must be white.
~ Backing fabric must be white (quilting cotton or bleached muslin is okay).
~ Middlings must come to me completely finished and ready to hang.
~ Middlings need a hanging sleeve attached to the top of the back.
~ There must be an official 70273 project label on the back of the quilt. When you’ve completed your Middling, contact me, and I’ll create the label for you and send it digitally. You’ll simply print and stitch.  I’ll be writing a post about that in the next few days, so check back for more details.

Important note: We are still making blocks and piecing them together to make Big Quilts. This does not replace blocks, it simply provides another option for those who are interested.

A few more Middlings in progress to send you looking for your sketch book:

A Middling for The 70273 Project Being Made by Maria Conway (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

A Middling in the making by Gisele Therezien (Channel Islands, UK)

Gisele writes: Prepping my Middlings background from a vintage doily & the edge of an old embroidered sheet donated by Mum which originally was part of her wedding trousseau 59 years ago, also have some vintage red lace which may fit in nicely. So we see that when it comes to stories and layers of meaning, size doesn’t matter.

Over the next several months, I’ll be revealing at least 3 more ways to make quilts for The 70273 Project over the next several months, so be sure you subscribe so you don’t miss out.

Your homework:
Check back for the shiny new Provenance Form.
Tell others about The 70273 Project.
Subscribe.
Start sketching!

~~~~~~~

UPDATE 2/2/2017:

Good clarification questions, asked and answered:

Q: Is it ok to have cream color in the background?
A: Yes, provided there’s some white and no other colors. Think of the creme/off white as an accent.

Q: Is it ok to have a textured background in cream or white i see that too?
A: Yes.

Q: i see that the middlings are finished with top quilting also
which requires batting. Can we do that too and what thickness of batting?
A: Yes, use batting. Doesn’t matter what kind, though most folks are using the 80/20 mix. You can find a little more about that on the Information for Piecers and Quilters page.

Q: Also what is the seam allowance for the larger size?
A: Just so long as the finished size is about 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm),  the seam allowance is up to you.

Q: Also i see a heart design out of the x’s which i love. So am i free to make any shape as long as it signifies pairs of x’s On white Or cream?
A: Yes! Isn’t that fun? You can use pairs of red X’s to make shapes, just remember that the red X’s must be stitched in pairs, so be sure to leave space between each pair like Margaret did.

Q: Can the red x’s just be on whole cloth or do they still need to be pieced?
A: The background of Middlings can be whole cloth or pieced, your preference, it just has to be about 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm) when finished.

Q: How will you catalog these?
A: Each pair of red X’s = one block (so be sure to tell me on the Provenance Form how many pairs are on your Middling) and my database is set up so that one block = one entry. That is, I must enter each block (or in this case paris of red X’s) separately. Here’s how the Middling process will go:

1. You make a middling
2. When finished, you email me this information: the total number of people commemorated; the finished size; when it was completed (month/year); and your name as you want it to appear on the quilt label.
3. I assign a quilt number, design the label and email it back to you.
4. You print and attach the label.
5. You send the Middling to me, with a Provenance Form (even if you’ve already completed one) telling me how many “blocks” (or pairs of red X’s) are on the Middling.
6. I enter each pair as a block (to update the block count and keep my records straight), giving you credit for each one. So you get credit for those “blocks” and for the Middling quilt itself.
Q: Do I need to complete a Provenance Form for each Middling, even if you already have a Provenance Form on file for me because I’ve sent you blocks?
A: Yes. I need a Provenance Form completed, signed, and sent with each Middling. If you send me 3 Middlings, I’ll need a Provenance Form pinned (safety pins, please) to each Middling because I’ve added the space for you to tell me how many blocks, or in this case, pairs of red X’s, are in each Middling. It will help me so much if I don’t have to count every pair of red X’s, so thank you for taking the time to do this.

Lacaze, Here We Come

Sunday morning
25 juin 2017
8:30 a.m.

Katell picks us up at our hotel in Albi, France and off we go to Lacaze with Katell behind the wheel and Kristine navigating.

The air is cool

the sun is shining

and the scenery is exquisite.

About an hour later, we round the curve

and we are at Lacaze, greeted with our country’s flag


and a sign to let us and others who will come later
know we are at the right place.



There are tears
at this first hint of the hospitality to come.

~~~~~~~

I will be writing the only way I can right now: in blurts, snippets, and bits – we’ll call them postcards, why don’t we –  that won’t necessarily be presented in chronological order, but as they rise to the surface of my heart. Which means you’ll receive these postcards all out of order, just as if I put a stamp on them and sent them through the postal service. That is how I will tell you about the first major European exhibit in Lacaze, France.

Now if you’d like to know more about The 70273 Project and help commemorate these people who deserved to live, here are some links you might be interested in:
~ making blocks
~ registering quilts
~ making middlings

And if you’d like to read the other postcards from this magical trip, here’s a road map for you:
Under Two Flags

Paris, Day One

Paris Day Two

Toulouse

Paris Again

More Kindness in Paris

“I drive you from airport. It is not much. This is how I contribute to this projet magnifique.”

They speak to each other in rapid-fire French. I can’t even pick out an “une” or a “du” or a “oui” – Chantal Baquin and the landlord to the flat we rent in Paris – so I give up trying and just stand there smiling, nodding when they look at me, hoping that’s appropriate. Suddenly the landlord’s face registers something – what? Surprise? Shock? She rubs each arm with the hand on the other arm and continues looking at me. Her eyes fill with tears. Chantal tells us that she’s just told the landlord why we are in France – for the Lacaze exhibit of The 70273 Project – and the landlord says she gets goosebumps and is very grateful for what we are doing.

They resume talking, and this time the landlord says she is so moved, she is doing something she’s never, ever done before: she insists that she will pick us up at the airport in Orly when we fly back to Paris after the exhibit. We thank her, never thinking about how we will be on our own – no Chantal with us to read and speak for us – trying to find her. We are blissfully stupid about this.

On Monday, the day after the exhibit, we arrive at the airport in Orly a few minutes late, fetch our bags, and head to the 10-minute parking lot – something we know to do because the thoughtful landlord called Chantal the night before and gave her instructions, except she didn’t mention where we find this 10-minute parking lot, and of course we didn’t think to ask till this very minute. I count aloud to ten in French – the only way I know to remember the word for the number ten – then scan signs in search of the word. Not seeing it anywhere, I do the only thing I know to do: I stand in the middle of the sidewalk and turn around and around with my mouth open while my face registers worry. Sure enough, before I complete the second turn, a man stops to ask if he can help us. He’s speaking in French, but I’m sure that’s what he asked. Yes, I’m very sure.

“Dix,” I say to him and hold up 10 fingers because I don’t trust my French, being only 4% fluent according to Duo Lingo.

Through hand gestures, he indicates we must re-enter the airport, walk to the other end, exit the airport, and walk around to the left where we will (eventually) find the 10-minute parking. “Merci beaucoup,” I tell him, and when he smiles, I do a little hop, so excited I am that he understood me.

At least, that’s the way I chose to interpret his smile. It could be my accent. I’m told I  have one.

Though I feel no panic like I think I should, I have no idea what we will do if Madame Landlord has already come and gone – which surely she has because it’s been more than 10 minutes after we asked Chantal to tell her we would be there. We are outside again on the other side of the terminal. I see the word “dix”, and I’m not sure if I’m happier that my French was correct or that we are finally in the right place. I stay with the bags and send Andy to find a car . . . oh no. We have no idea what kind or color car Mme. Landlord drives. There’s nothing to do but move forward, so I stay with the suitcases and tell Andy to go look for the landlord’s face. He is about 20 steps away, when she pulls up to the curb, leaps from her car, and runs towards us. She is sorry she is late and made us wait. I assure her we just got there ourselves. At least that’s what I meant to say. What actually came out of my mouth could be something totally different.

She had water and cups bearing a mid-century plaid. So thoughtful. Such hospitality.

She has a big bottle of water for us in the car, with the cutest paper cups (bearing my favorite mid-century plaid) I’ve ever seen. I am so touched by her hospitality, I surreptitiously save the cup.

She opens the sunroof so we can see better, and I have to tell you it is the most fabulous sunroof I’ve ever seen.

The Paris sky isn’t bad either.

She tells us of things we are passing, giving us a personalized tour. When she gets to The Bee Hotel, she is concerned that we didn’t understand about the bees that were raised on a floor of the hotel, so what does she do? She dials Chantal to ask for the words in English. Yes, she’s that thoughtful.

pairs of X’s everywhere

We get back to the flat, and Madame Landlord insists on helping us get our luggage into the flat. Once that’s done, we thank her again, to which she puts her hand up and tells us through tears, that she is quite moved by The 70273 Project, and picking us up at the airport will be her small contribution to this projet magnifique.

~~~~~~~

Because:
~ we had only one night between arriving home from France and flying to Florida to visit Nancy,
~ we had no internet in Florida,
~ we got home from Florida and left to come to Georgia where we have been working long hours every day,
~ I am still overwhelmed with thoughts, memories, and emotions from the trip to France,
~ there is so much to tell,
~ I am still processing it all
~ and receiving photos,
I will be writing the only way I can right now: in blurts, snippets, and bits – we’ll call them postcards, why don’t we –  that won’t be presented in chronological order, but as they rise to the surface of my heart. Which means you’ll receive these postcards all out of order, just as if I put a stamp on them and sent them through the postal service. That is how I will tell you about the first major European exhibit in Lacaze, France.

Now if you’d like to know more about The 70273 Project and help commemorate these people who deserved to live, here are some links you might be interested in:
~ making blocks
~ registering quilts
~ making middlings

Week 69: June 9-15, 2017 Recap

Week 69 – up and down the road we went. One night atop the mountain, then it was right back down. Highlights of the week include . . .

EVENTS:
On Saturday, 6/17/17, Peggy Thomas and I held a block drive at the Peachtree City Library in Peachtree City, GA. When Library Administrator Jill Prouty stopped by our booth at Fayette Woman Live last March to hear about The 70273 Project and make a block, she immediately invited us to hold a block drive as part of their summer theme, Build a Better World. We immediately said Yes.

Many blocks were made on Saturday – including blocks from people visiting Peachtree City from China, India, and Australia! Peggy and I proposed to Rebecca Watts, Circulation Supervisor, that they collect blocks throughout the summer and make a Peachtree City Library Quilt in the fall. Rebecca not only agreed, she asked if she could display some Middlings on the ends of the shelves. Guess what I said! Peggy is creating go bags of materials to make blocks, so when you stop by the library to grab your bag or turn in your blocks, take a minute to look at Middlings 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, and 52 made by Margaret Williams (Tucker, GA USA) and Middling #134 made by Maria Conway (Buenos Aires, Argentina).

BLOG POSTS WRITTEN:
Annie Labruyere paid a heartwarming visit to the vocational school Armand Malaise in Charleville-Mezieres, France, and she wrote about it in Episode 1 and Episode 2

Wendy Reed’s involvement in The 70273 Project has grown since she first heard about it. Here’s the latest.

Katell Renon (what would I do without her?) writes about another example of how French and Americans work together with creativity and dedication to ensure that history is not forgotten.

And in case you missed it, Katell writes of the upcoming-won’t-be-long-now First Major European Exhibit of The 70273 Project in Lacaze, France that she and many others have worked tirelessly to bring into being.

DONATIONS RECEIVED:
Frances Holliday Alford – Thank you!

The 70273 Project Quilt 141, made by Debra Woods

BLOCKS & QUILTS RECEIVED:
Quilt 134: Maria Conway: (Argentina) 202 commemorations
Quilt 141: Debra Woods (USA)  (31 commemorations)
Suzy Jubin (Switzerland)
Layette Martin (France)
Chantal Sogno (France)
Christine Prades (France)
Marie-Claude Paris (Netherlands)
Nadine Gaudin (France)
Janette Resano (France)
Dominique Bernot (France)
Annie Rimbault (France)
Nicole Dufour (France)
Yolanda Dray (France)
Martine Priarli (France)
Marie Claire Vagnati (France)
Laetitia Brugere (France)
Dominique Deutsch (France)
Danielle Fayet (France)
Claire Schwartz (France)
Christianne Humbert (France)
Chloe Grice (France)
Cecile Dennis (France)
Anonymous

Which brings our block count to: 18,078! 

Thank y’all for continuing to commemorate, and remember: June is Middling Month (though you can make a Middling any time, of course), so maybe you want to kick the summer off (depending on what part of the world you call Home) by stretching your creative wings.

On we grow as on we sew!

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Weeks 60-69 (4/3 – 5/11, 2017) Recap

The 70273 Project Quilt #10 brings home some new jewelry!

Good news: the reconstruction is as finished as it’s ever going to be, so I’ve dedicated myself to getting the blocks checked-in (among other things). You might want to fix yourself something to drink, cause we’re gonna’take this week by week, and there are a lotta’ weeks to cover . . .

My maternal grandmother’s paper scissors still sail right through paper like cutting through melted butter. I don’t know if they make ’em like this any more.

Week 60: 4/3-9, 2017 Highlights

  • The Engineer prepared and filed the income tax report.
  • Elaine Fields Smith and Pam Patterson had a booth at the Stephenville Native & Heirloom Plant Fair in Texas.
  • Received blocks from:
    • Kathryn Snow (GA/USA)
    • Deborah L. J. MacKinnon (WA/USA)
    • Sandra Readler (VT/USA)
    • Rebecca Hart (MO/USA)
    • Tree Kuhalich (SC/USA)
    • Sharon Brendle (WA/USA)
    • Vickie Turner (GA/USA)

Closeup of Quilt #10

Week 61: 4/10-16, 2017 Highlights

  • A post on the French Patchwork Guild blog
  • A post by Sandi Hazelwood on The Crafty Planner Blog
  • Computer meltdown (a.k.a. major angst)
  • Donations received from:
    • Frances Alford (financial – Thank you!)
    • Susan Burch (fabric – Thank you!)
  • Blocks received from:
    • Anon
    • Margaret Williams (GA/USA)
    • AnneVisart deBocarne (Belgium)

Week 62: 4/17-23, 2017 Highlights

  • Reconstruction from computer meltdown begins
  • Block drive at Fayette Senior Services; in Fayetteville, GA on 4/21
  • Received blocks from:
    • Tricia Stearns (GA/USA)
    • Sandy Snowden (England)
    • Betty Buford (UK)
    • Nancy Glynn (GA/USA)
    • Paula Anderson (GA/USA)</li>
    • Anne Rodriguez (GA/USA)
    • Carlotta Vagaro (GA/USA)

Making blocks in the Channel Islands, UK

Week 63: 4/24-30, 2017 Highlights

  • Sent Quilt #31 off to quilter Janet Eidem
  • Sent bundles of blocks to:
    • Janine Morrell
    • Francs Alford
  • Developed and posted new guidelines for registering a quilt with The 70273 Project
  • Another block drive in the Channel Islands, UK organized and facilitated by The 70273 Project Ambassadors Kim Monins and Gisele Therezien. Even the Parish Constable & Vicar showed up to participate!
  • Pam Patterson, Jiny, and Bob: met at post office for delightful (if short) visit and hand delivered blocks, fabric, and smiles.
  • Blocks received from:
    • Margaret Williams (GA/USA)
    • Kris Phillips (WA/USA)
    • Wendy Anton (England)
    • Pam Patterson (TX/USA)
    • Cathy Watkins (CAN)
    • Susan Burch and grands (GA/USA)

Screen shot from Instagram: Cera.Bee quilts #104 of The 70273 Project.

Week 64: 5/1-7, 2017 Highlights

  • Donation received from Teddy Pruett – Thank you, Sugar!
  • Sent bundles to:
    • Frances Alford, Quilt 151
    • Janine Morrell, Quilt 135
  • Blocks received from:
    • Rosemary Wellner and A Circle of Friends (NJ/USA)
    • Maria Conway (Argentina)
    • Marina Olivari (Argentina)
    • Beth Baray (NJ/USA)
    • Bev Betz (NJ/USA)
    • Betty Bryson (NJ/USA)
    • Pat Edwards (NJ/USA)
    • Pat Fox (NJ/USA)
    • Florence Grehlinger (NJ/USA)
    • Jean Hills (NJ/USA)
    • Arlene Schnaare (NJ/USA)
    • Dutch Wests (NJ/USA)
    • Linda White (NJ/USA)
    • Sherron Davis (NJ/USA)
    • Liz Johnson (NJ/USA)
    • Ann McCay (NJ/USA)
    • Annie O’Brien (NJ/USA)
    • Sandy Renninger (NJ/USA)
    • Linda White (NJ/USA)
    • Dianna Kelly (NJ/USA)
    • Sally Clark Massinio (NJ/USA)
    • Barbara Piquet (NJ/USA)
    • Cathy Skinner (NJ/USA)
    • Jeanne Hewell-Chambers (NC,GA/USA)
    • Deirdre McConathy (KY/USA)

The 70273 Project had a presence at the Traverse City, Michigan Human Rights Awareness Night thanks to 70273 Project Ambassador Suzanne McCarthy

Week 65: 5/8-14, 2017 Highlights

  • Suzanne McCarthy had a table at the Traverse City, MI Human Rights Commission event on 5/9, and some really good things have come from it.
  • A good post by Annie Labruyere on her blog
  • Spent the week at the beach with my family, so not home to receive blocks.

Week 66: 5/15-21, 2017 Highlights

  • Identification and reconstruction of information lost in computer meltdown still continues
  • The blog theme broke, so as a stop-gap measure, I spent time rearranging things so nothing is lost or unsightly, and in the meantime, I continue to work on the site makeover as time permits.
  • Blocks received from:
  • Quilt #3 hung in the Tree City Quilt Guild show in Gainesville, Florida.
  • Blocks received from:
    • Eileen Bradshaw (FL/USA)
    • Laver Austin (FL/USA)
    • Donna Lee (IL/USA)
    • Cindy Cavallo (NV/USA)
    • Anonymous
    • Debbie Burchell (CAN)
    • Glenna Kelley (FL/USA)
    • Jody Kelley (FL/USA)
    • Alta Paul (FL/USA)
    • Carolyn Katzoff (CO/USA) Collaborative blocks!*
    • Little Luna (VA/USA)

Special delivery from Tracey Selingo

Week 67: 5/22-28, 2017 Highlights

  • Designed shipping labels
  • Reconstruction continues. Sigh.
  • A good post by Rebecca Glotfelty
  • Blocks received from:
    • Margaret Williams (GA/USA)
    • Jan Stone (USA)
    • Tracey Selingo (PA/USA)
    • Dave Harman (UK)
    • Vanessa Black (GA)
    • Idalina DaSilva (CAN)

Week 68: 5/29-6/4, 2017 Highlights

  • A good post by Wendy Reed
  • A good post by Annie Labruyere
  • Blocks received from:
    • Andrea Schupbach (Germany)
    • Becky Lawyer (IN/USA)

Kim and Steve Monins from Jersey, Channel Islands, UK

Week 69: 6/5-11, 2017 Highlights

  • A good post by Jan Stone
  • Send a bundle of blocks to Patti Baymiller to piece
  • Delivered 5 bundles of blocks to Margaret Williams to piece and quilt
  • The 70273 Project Quilt #10 won herself some new jewelry (a.k.a. a Third Place Ribbon in the Group Quilts Category) at the East Cobb Quilt Guild Show.
  • The 70273 Project Ambassador Kim Monins and her husband, Steve came across the pond and paid us a visit. One night simply wasn’t long enough, though, even if they do talk funny. Hoping for more time next year.
  • Blocks received from:
    • Jean Gelsinger (MO/USA)
    • Long Beach Modern Quilt Guild (CA/USA)
    • Norma Hanlon (MN/USA)
    • Vina Missel (MI/USA)

There were many quilt numbers handed out and several quilts received.
I’ll tell you about those in future posts.

Okay, you might want to put your beverage down now
before you read any further, cause this is Big, y’all. This is Real Big . . .

Our current block count is – are you ready?

17,735

I’m not kidding – 17,735 people have been commemorated as of Sunday, 6/11/2017.
Y’all give yourselves a great big hug.
But wait . . . there’s more.

Block #17,568 made by Little Luna

I won’t name names, but some of you more mathematically inclined
may have already picked up on the fact that the magic 25% number
is 17,568, and now I present our block #17,568 made by Little Luna.
If her name sounds familiar, it’s because you’ve already met her.

Thank you to all of you who have stitched, who continue to stitch, and who will stitch.
To those who don’t want to stitch but do want to help commemorate,
perhaps you’d like to make a financial donation
by mashing the Donate button in the sidebar.
We have a lot of quilts to get home from around the world,
and other expenses are starting to mount,
so I promise we’ll put your money to good use.

We may have hit a milestone – a sizable milestone – and there are many more
to commemorate, so I hope this motivates you to recommit to
more stitching, to more telling, to more commemorating.
And hey, remember: June is Middling Month!

~~~~~~~

Subscribe.
Join.
Stitch.

Weeks 52-59 (2/13/2017 – 4/2/2017) Recap

My constant companion during The Great Reconstruction, my Scratch Pad – receptacle for all notes about what I’ve done and what I need to do and what I might try next and other assorted detritus.

After spending many, many 14-16 hour days (and a few 24 hour days) reconstructing the information that was lost in the computer meltdown by sifting through emails, backed up files, paper files, handwritten notes, memory, blog posts, other people’s blog posts, and anywhere else I can think of to look for information, I’m ready to begin bringing us up to date . . . with emphasis on the word begin. There is still much to do, and I thank you for your continued patience. You may have assumed that I have grown tired of the project and had begun drifting away, but let me assure you that nothing could be further from the truth. My passion remains high and intact for The 70273
Project, and my gratitude continues to run deep and wide.

Like Janus, I look back with one eye and ahead with the other – and while I could do without the sometimes overwhelming stress of the to do list that tucks me in bed every night and greets me every morning, I am delighted beyond description that so many people have been commemorated and so many people are being commemorated. And shoot, I actually kinda’ enjoy the problem solving.

I do feel compelled to say, though, that there might very well be some adjustments made as Operation: Reconstruct continues and new old information is discovered. So now, without further ado, let’s see what happened in The 70273 Project between April 2 and the last time we recapped together on 2/12/2017 . . .

TRAVEL (in chronological order)

  • Denver, CO
  • Cashiers, NC
  • Fayetteville, GA
  • Berea, KY
  • Findlay, OH
  • Lebanon, KY
  • Fayetteville, GA
  • Cashiers, NC
  • Amicalola Falls, GA
  • Cashiers, NC
  • Peachtree City, GA
  • Cashiers, NC
  • Peachtree City, GA
  • Denver, CO

SPECIAL EVENTS

  • babysitting
  • The Best Birthday Party EVAH- Thank you, Chloe Grice and members of The 70273 Project Tribe! I’ve never experienced anything like it. It was wonderful, marvelous, humbling, and very much appreciated.
  • the flu that laid me flat and would not end
  • spent many days and weeks moving our daughter
  • coughed our way into Berea, KY where we spent the night and had breakfast at Boone Tavern and Inn
  • enjoyed Findlay, Ohio, thanks to our personal guide, Tanya Weising-Pike, Director of Education at Blanchard Valley Center
  • delivered Quilt #5 to Blanchard Valley Center
  • met and fell in love with the wonderful teachers, parents, and staff at Blanchard Valley; the Mayor of Findlay; and Randy Roberts of The Findlay Courier who let me use his photo, saying “I’ve got to tell you: I am very impressed with the heart of this project.”
  • coughed our way back to Fayetteville, rested for a day, then enjoyed a day of making blocks with my Tiger Girls (women I graduated from high school with). I’m gonna’ introduce you in a blog post coming soon.
  • joined Peggy Thomas and Patty Guillick at The 70273 Project booth at Joyce Beverly’s Fayette Woman LIVE where many, many, many blocks were made. I can’t wait to tell you about it, and I will . . . in a blog post coming soon.
  • made blocks with the Friendship Circle at the Fayetteville First United Methodist Church. You guessed it – there’s a post coming soon to a blog near you.
  • spoke to The Writer’s High Retreat, kicking things off on Friday night, where I met some marvelously interesting  and interested folks.
  • answered the good questions of Elodie Redoulèz for an article she was writing about The 70273 Project for the Bailiwick Express in the Jersey, Channel Islands, UK.
  • closed this time period out the way it began: babysitting in Denver.

QUILT NUMBERS ASSIGNED

  • 6 quilt numbers to Katell Renon in France (73, 74, 75, 76, 77, 78)

BUNDLES SENT

  • Kitty Sorgen (Quilt #31). It’s now being quilted by Janet Eidem.
  • Jackie Batman (Quilt #56)
  • Kellye Rose ( #62, #63, and #64)
  • Sharleen Jespersen (Quilt #103)
  • Sarah Jespersen Lauzon (Quilt #104)
  • Alejandrina Pattin (Quilt #105)
  • Sandy Martin and the Caribou Quilters (Quilt #65)

QUILTS RECEIVED

The 70273 Project Quilt 102, a Middling made by Debra Steinmann.

#102, a Middling created by Debra Steinmann (GA/USA) that’s now on display at Intown Quilters in Decatur, GA. I also designed materials for the shop to hand out. If you need me to design materials for you to give others, let me know. Once upon a life chapter, I was a freelance graphic designer. It’s something I enjoy doing.

The 70273 Project Quilt 138. Pieced by Kathleen Carfagno, Quilted by Jessica Skultey.

and the beautiful quilt top now known as Quilt #138 made by Kathleen K Carfagno (NJ/USA) and currently being quilted by Jessica Skultey (NJ/USA).

BLOCKS RECEIVED

  • Beth Brennan (IL/USA)
  • Debra Woods (MO/USA)
  • Betty Jo Oliver (KY/USA)
  • Kayos Huff (aged 5, MO/USA)
  • Market Dwyer (MN/USA)
  • Celine Henries (France)
  • Jane Cunningham (New Zealand)
  • Peggy Lowrie (TX/USA)
  • Jane Riddell (GA/USA)
  • Jean Fischer (GA/USA)
  • Dianna Moore (GA/USA)
  • Linda King Smith (GA/USA)
  • Jeanne Hewell Chambers (GA,NC/USA)
  • Joan Dumas Hughey (GA/USA)
  • Elender Ballard (GA/USA)
  • Joan McKnight (Canada)
  • Faye Cook (AUS)
  • Kevin Thomas (GA/USA)
  • Olivia Ries (GA/USA)
  • Peggy Thomas (GA/USA)
  • Bisa Batten Lewis (GA/USA
  • Connie Fox (GA/USA)
  • FeFe Handy (GA/USA)
  • Nicole Simmons (GA/USA)
  • Nancy Jaworski (GA/USA)
  • Jennifer Harper (GA/USA)
  • Maggie Laton (GA/USA)
  • Jill Prouty (GA/USA)
  • Ellie White-Stevens (GA/USA)
  • Stephanie Washington (GA/USA)
  • Carla Wong McMillian (GA/USA)
  • Jamie Smith (GA/USA)
  • Carmen Johnson (GA/USA)
  • Diana M Lovell (GA/USA)
  • Julie Irby/Camryn Johnson (GA/USA)
  • Cathy Jackson (GA/USA)
  • Paulette Bass (GA/USA)
  • Kathy Bohannon (GA/USA)
  • Shelly Gable (GA/USA)
  • Delores Epps (GA/USA)
  • Jean Peck (GA/USA)
  • Jennifer Harper (GA/USA)
  • Elisa Marcus Price (GA/USA)
  • Melodie Parks (GA/USA)
  • Fairy L. Wortham (GA/USA)
  • Jackie Pope (GA/USA)
  • Carrie Franklin (WA/USA)
  • Melodie Parks (GA/USA)
  • Jackie Pope (GA/USA)
  • Loose Threads (MN.USA)
  • Deborah L. J. McKinnon and members of the Kingston/North Kitsap Rotary Club (WA/USA)
  • Wendy Caton Reed (ME/USA)
  • Diane Dresden (VA/USA)
  • Gail Georgia (ID/USA)
  • Polly Davis (USA)
  • Dottie Gray (GA/USA)
  • Bonnie Giglio (GA/USA)
  • Carly Burch (GA/USA)
  • Janet Baileys (GA/USA)
  • Charlotte McAdams (GA/USA)
  • Marilyn Harris (GA/USA)
  • Amanda (Nikki) Neal (GA/USA)
  • Tami Kemberling (GA/USA)
  • Susan Burch (GA/USA)
  • Roselyn Roberts (GA/USA)
  • Clara Martin (GA/USA)
  • Carolyn McKinley (GA/USA)
  • Alida Palmisano (MD/USA)
  • Brigid Martin (GA/USA)
  • Jean Foglein (Canada)
  • Marlies (Belgium)
  • Karlijn Lecluyse (Belgium)
  • the 99 commemorations in Quilt 102
  • the 62 commemorations in Quilt 138

And now, what you’ve all been waiting for: the block count as of 4/2/2017: 9099 (and growing)!

(Bear with me as I makeover the web site in the background of the reconstruction . . . which means that some things – oh, like the block counter chart, for example –  might not be where you remember them or where they’re supposed to be or where you will find them next week.)

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