The 70273 Project

with a side of Jeanne Hewell-Chambers

Search results: "middling" (page 1 of 5)

Middlings Being Made at Marbridge

Lynn Woll is a woman who does what she says she’s gonna’ do. I meet Lynn at The 70273 Project Special Exhibit at the International Quilt Festival in Houston, Texas last month. She asks if she can interview me for Create Whimsy, her beautiful blog, and she does. She tells me she is going to make quilts with her sister and friends at Marbridge, and she does.

On December 2, 2017, Lynn takes fabric and other supplies to Marbridge where 12 people make 12 Middlings.

Photo Description: A man wearing a red sweater and a big smile adds fabric in the shape of pairs of red X’s to a base of white fabric.

 

Photo Description: A woman wearing a green t-shirt weaves strips of red fabric to make a pair of red X’s on a base of white fabric.

 

Photo Description: A man wearing a white t-shirt and a big smile cuts and arranges red ribbon in the shape of pairs of X’s to a base of white fabric.

 

Photo Description: Janet, Lynn’s sister wears a big smile, a Christmas headband, and a long-sleeved t-shirt with the word “Texas” on it as she arranges red fabric as pairs of red X’s to a base of white fabric.

Writes Lynn after the quilt-making afternoon:

“I had 12 residents participate and made 12 Middlings. We had so much fun today, and I love sharing your story with the residents of Marbridge. I explained about WWII and the Nazis and how they didn’t like people who were different from them and that 70273 people who doctors said were different were murdered, and we were honoring those people. The resident got it – a few even said, ‘People like me?'”

Thank you Lynn, Janet, and friends at Marbridge. I can’t wait to hear more stories and see your finished quilts.

Audio of Jeanne reading this blog post
~~~~~~~
I’m starting a monthly newsletter – The 70273 Project XXtra –  that will be filled with bits of information you might be interested in and might not see anywhere else. Maybe you want to subscribe?

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Quilt #187, a Middling made by Laurie Dunn

The 70273 Project Quilt #187, a Middling made by Laurie Dunn

Laurie writes . . .

“What is a middling?”  I asked. “made from fat quarter size fabric.” (Really–those little bundles tied up at the fabric store unfold?)   A small quilt. Someone shared a picture.  I was getting it. Remember I am not a quilter.  

Quilt #187, a Middling by Laurie Dunn

I cut fabric the required size plus a half inch. I grabbed my embroidery hoop and the spool of red sewing thread I had been using and began to stitch pairs of X’s. Always in pairs. I absent-mindedly follow the curve of the hoop. When it got awkward, I moved the hoop. Continued and removed the hoop. Hmmmm. Looks like a heart, sort of. So I tried to continue the heart idea. XX of various stitches, various sizes. My January project.

I took my thread and my hoop to visit my 91 year old Dad. “Are you going to finish it by Valentine’s Day?” he asked as I was still working on it after his February 3rd birthday. A new deadline.

Jeanne asked me how it felt to make a Middling. I started with trepidation. I am not a quilter. This is taking a lot of time if it is not right. I set it aside, picked it up, took it to work when I watched the grandkids.

Quilt #187, a Middling made by Laurie Dunn

One of the Monthly Mixer challenges was “a picture of the smallest pair of XX you can find.” That somehow gave me the freedom to make very small XX pairs. And that led me to thinking of small individuals – how young were the lives we are remembering. Some of the individuals I work with are adults but are of very small stature for their age. Some of my pairs were prickly, some stout. My pairs marched and meandered . . . is that how “our” individuals entered the gas chambers?

Quilt #187, a Middling by Laurie Dunn

When I got my decidedly wonky heart shape finished, I counted 200 pairs. Then I added 14 more larger ones from fabric – just because that is how many fit. I cut the back and the filling (an old felted waterbed pad – my mother-in-law always used old blankets for batting in her quilts.) I stitched around the edges – pillow case style – a term I learned form fellow participants in The 70273 Project. My plan had been to machine stitch between the rows of pairs of X’s. Around the inside of the heart I went. Then the inside of the inside row. I could not do more, the rows seemed too close together. I sent a picture to Chloe Grice asking if she thought it was “right”. She said to post it, so I did, and y’all (another term I’m learning from this group!), y’all hit “like”. No one said to add more quilting.

Laurie Dunn and Quilt #187, a Middling

Took it to show my dad. He got a big grin. Later on that evening, he suddenly said, “Don’t do any more quilting.” I have always tried to obey my dad.

I keep looking at it, moving it from place to place. I still need to put a sleeve on the back. It is very much like a baby blanket, like a baby I’m not ready to send into the world quite yet.

~~~~~~~

Laurie, your Middling and your words are tender and quite touching. I am moved by the fact that as you say, you are not a quilter, and yet you feel so deeply about the people you work with and the people we commemorate that you simply cut the fabric, thread the needle, and start. You may  have been working on it since January, but you’ll finish it in June, which as you know, is Middling Month! Please hug your dad for me next time you see him, and tell him what I always ask you to tell him: that I thank him for his service and for the daughter who is now my friend.

Would you like to make a Middling? Here are the important things to remember:
~ Middlings are sent to me as finished quilts.
~ finished size is approximately 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm) .
~ The base must be white or slightly off white.
~ The binding is white.
~ Creativity is allowed in that you can create shapes but please, no words, letters, or numbers other than “70273” – and that one number can only be used on Middlings. Individual blocks can have only two red X’s.
~ The two red X’s must be presented as obvious pairs, not as an endless string of red X’s because each pair represents a person commemorated, and that’s what we’re about.
~ The Provenance Form must be completed, signed, and sent as usual – one for each person who helped create the quilt.
~ You must tell me on the Provenance Form how many people you’ve commemorated so I don’t have to stop and count.

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Quilt #179, a Middling Made by Cindy Cavallo

The 70,273 Project Quilt #179 made by Cindy Cavallo

Dear Jeanne,

My name is Cindy Cavallo. I am a lifetime Reno, Nevada resident. I retired from University of Nevada-Reno in December of 2012, where I was an instructor of Interior Design for 11.5 years. I taught Residential Design, Housing, and Textiles, with Textiles being my first love. I learned of The 70,273 Project from my Quilt Guild – Truckee Meadows Quilters. I’ve been quilting on and off for the last 25 years. I’ve made many quilts, tried many blocks, and left many project unfinished out of lack of importance. I’ve wanted to “quilt with a purpose” for several years now, and The 70,273 Project seemed to speak straight to my heart!

One of the most moving experiences of my life was a trip to the National Holocaust Museum in Washington, D. C. I’m honored to be a part of this amazing movement – the remembrance of those whose lives were randomly cut so short. I think of what the world truly lost and imagine if the Steven Hawkings, Helen Kellers, the FDRs and Kim Peeks of the world were taken early – where would the world be today without their gifts?

The 70,273 Project Quilt #179, detail

My Middling (18.5″ x 22″) was made and finished in April of 2017 with fabrics from my stash. In my twenties I traveled to Europe. I collected fabrics and ribbons from France and Belgium, those are included in my quilt. The backing and some ribbon are from my mother’s collection. She passed at the age of 95 in 2015, and working with her things was a sweet reminder of her and learning to sew as a youngster on her old Singer! I wanted to use some traditional techniques (flying geese) and modern advancements of dye cutting fonts to recognize individuals. 33 lives are commemorated in all – each with love and the deepest respect.  

The 70,273 Project Quilt #179, detail

I honor family and friends who suffer from physical and mental diseases and realize they, too, would have most likely received the dreaded XX. Their love and compassion, not to mention individual talents, would have been taken from us. The very thought! Education is the only remedy for such atrocities. I want everyone to remember the past so we don’t repeat this mistake made by calloused individuals. I thank you for taking on the creation, responsibility, and the monumental task of The 70,273 Project. 

Kindest regards,

Cindy

~~~~~~~

Cindy, thank your beautiful Middling and for your touching words. I can’t tell you how many time a day I think what a big empty hole would be in my life were there no Nancy. It’s unfathomable, really. I look forward to our paths crossing in person one day so I can call you Sugar to your face. xo

~~~~~~~

Would you like to make a Middling?
Would you like to make blocks?
Would you like to Piece a top or Quilt a quilt or both? Just let me know.

Quilt 169, a Middling by Margaret Andrews

The 70273 Project Quilt 169, a Middling by Margaret Andrews. 16.5″ x 22.5″. May 2017.

The base material is the fabric that is used for soles of footed pjs. That reminds me of the security we have, but that was denied the 70,273 victims. The lace along the left border is from my bedroom curtains, and represents the security (again), and the comforts of home, for me, and for the perpetrators of the injustices committed against the victims. I also chose these materials, along with the red wool felt for the larger pairs of Xs for the textural interest, thinking of those with visual impairment. Both the columns of red Xs ending in ❌❌ outlined teardrops and the quilting represent the tears of those of us involved in The 70,273 Project, as well as tears of the family members over the loss of their loved ones.

This Middling contains 440 pairs of Xs, representing 440 lives lost in this atrocity.

~~~~~~~

Thank you, Margaret. Your beautiful stitched commemorations are made even more beautiful by your words.

June is Middling Month in The 70273 Project. Join us?

June: Middling Month

The 70273 Project Quilt 52, a Middling made by Margaret Williams, 110 people commemorated

Y’all probably remember that on February 1, 2017, I introduced The 70273 Project Middling Quilts, and now – today, June 1, 2017 – I’m declaring June as Middling Month.

The 70273 Project Quilt 134, a Middling by Maria Conway. This is the Middling in progress. I’ll show you the finished Middling soon.

If you’ve been thinking about making a Middling, this is a good time to get started. If you’ve been meaning to get that Middling finished, this is a good time to get it finished. If you’re looking for a goal to sink your needle into, this is a good time to decide how many Middlings you want to make and thread your needle. Me, I’m going to make at least two in addition to the 3 I’ve already made. (Truth: I’d love to make one a week – and while I have the fantasy life to do it, I’m trying to be more realistic, so I’ll say 2.) (And hope for more.)

The 70273 Project Tribe Member, Piecer, and Quilter Sharlene Jespersen, stands with The 70273 Project Quilt 1 at QuiltCon in Savannah, February 2017.

Now let’s be clear: this does not mean that Middlings are replacing blocks – not at all, far from it, never gonna’ happen. If you want to keep stitching the original blocks, please do. If you want to receive a bundle (or more!) of blocks to piece and quilt – either or both – please let me know. I have a studio filled with blocks just waiting to be pieced and quilted, and they’d love to come spend the summer with you.

The 70273 Project Quilt 44 made by the Can’canettes in Castres, France

Or if you’re vacationing with family or attending camp or retreats with friends, maybe y’all would like to make a group quilt. That’d be awesome.

The 70273 Project Quilt 34, a Long Skinny made by Gisele Therezien in Jersey, Channel Islands UK

The 70273 Project Quilt 125, a Long Skinny made by Margaret Jackson and her family in the UK

And if you’re inclined to make a Long Skinny, by all means do it, Sugar. I’d love to have more Long Skinnies.

Though important, guidelines for Middlings are kept to a minimum, and you can click right this way to read more about them.

Middlings are now my Am Ex – I never leave home without them. Why do I love them so? Oh, just let me count the ways . . .
~ They fit quite nicely in the smallest of bags
~ It’s easy to pull them out and stitch on them even in the smallest, tightest spaces,
~ In this small piece of cloth there’s plenty of room to spread your creative wings
~ You can commemorate as many people as you like.
Are you convinced? (Say Yes.)

I’ll also be profiling some astoundingly moving Middlings here, so be sure to check back often. Whatever you’re stitching, these Middlings will be kindling to your creative fire, I promise you that. They are astonishing and deeply moving.

How many Middlings do you think we can get made in June? If you’re joining in as a June Middler, leave a comment here on the blog; in the Facebook group or on the Facebook page and let us know. And be sure to send photos as you stitch along to whet our appetite and so we can cheer you on.

Stitch on, y’all, and hey, thanks for helping commemorate these special folks.

~~~~~~~

Important things to remember when making Middlings:
~ Middlings are sent to me as finished quilts.
~ The finished size of a Middling is approximately 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm) .
~ The base must be white or slightly off white.
~ The binding is white.
~ Creativity is allowed in that you can create shapes but please, no words, letters, or numbers other than “70273” – and that one number can only be used on Middlings. Individual blocks can have only two red X’s.
~ The two red X’s must be presented as obvious pairs, not as an endless string of red X’s because each pair represents a person commemorated, and that’s what we’re about.
~ The Provenance Form must be completed, signed, and sent as usual – one for each person who helped create the quilt. The address is on the form.
~ Indicate on the Provenance Form how many people you’ve commemorated (so I don’t have to stop and count).

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A New Way To Make Blocks and Quilts: Middlings

Remember how I’ve always said that I want quilts of all sizes so we can fit into any venue that will have us? Remember how I’ve always said I want our displays to be a feast for the senses?
Remember how I’ve always said I want viewers to feel the full impact when viewing The 70273 Project quilts?

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project made by Margaret Williams

Well now, thanks to an idea seed planted by Lynn Krawczyk, I’m opening up a new way to make not just blocks, but quilts for The 70273 Project. It’s a whole new category of quilts called Middlings, and I asked a few elves to stitch up some to give you some ideas.

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project Made by Margaret Williams (GA/USA)

Most guidelines remain in place: background is white or slightly off white, pairs of red X’s, no letters, numbers, words, names, or writing of any other sort to distract from the red X’s, but then . . . Middlings. Here’s what you need to know about making Middlings:

~ Middlings are sent to me as finished quilts.

~ The finished size of a Middling is approximately 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm)  (fat quarter size).

~ The base must be white or slightly off white.

~ The binding is white.

~ Creativity is allowed in that you can create shapes but please, no words, letters, or numbers other than “70273” – and that one number can only be used on Middlings. Individual blocks can have only two red X’s.

~ The two red X’s must be presented as obvious pairs, not as an endless string of red X’s because each pair represents a person commemorated, and that’s what we’re about.

~ The Provenance Form must be completed, signed, and sent as usual – one for each person who helped create the quilt. The mailing address is on the form.

~ You must tell me on the Provenance Form how many people you’ve commemorated so I don’t have to stop and count.

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project made by Margaret Williams (GA/USA)

And are you ready for this? You can also commemorate many more people because as long as the red X’s are presented as easily recognizable pairs, you can commemorate as many people as desired in one Middling quilt. In the quilt above, there are 119 pairs of red X’s which means that Margaret made 119 blocks which means that she commemorated 119 people. Yes, that’s right: each pair of red X’s counts as one block. I’m not kidding.

A Middling Quilt for The 70273 Project Made by Margaret Williams (GA/USA)

Guidelines for Middlings:
~ Background fabric must be white or slightly off white (representing the medical records, the only information assessing physicians used to make their life and death decisions).
~ Red X’s must be presented as easily recognizable pairs because each pair of red X’s represents one person.
~ Using easily identifiable pairs of red X’s, you can make shapes, but no letters, names, words to distract from the double X’s.
~ The only number that can be used is “70273”.
~ An amended Provenance Form includes a space for you to tell me how many pairs of red X’s are on your Middling. We’re gonna’ operate on the honor system, and I’m sure you can figure out why.
~ Finished size of Middlings is about 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm).
~ Bindings or facings (finished edges) must be white.
~ Backing fabric must be white (quilting cotton or bleached muslin is okay).
~ Middlings must come to me completely finished and ready to hang.
~ Middlings need a 4″ hanging sleeve attached to the top of the back.
~ There must be an official 70273 project label on the back of the quilt. When you’ve completed your Middling, contact me, and I’ll create the label for you and send it digitally. You’ll simply print and stitch.

Important note: We are still making blocks and piecing them together to make Big Quilts. This does not replace blocks, it simply provides another option for those who are interested.

A few more Middlings in progress to send you looking for your sketch book:

A Middling for The 70273 Project Being Made by Maria Conway (Buenos Aires, Argentina)

A Middling in the making by Gisele Therezien (Channel Islands, UK)

Gisele writes: Prepping my Middlings background from a vintage doily & the edge of an old embroidered sheet donated by Mum which originally was part of her wedding trousseau 59 years ago, also have some vintage red lace which may fit in nicely. So we see that when it comes to stories and layers of meaning, size doesn’t matter.

Over the next several months, I’ll be revealing at least 3 more ways to make quilts for The 70273 Project over the next several months, so be sure you subscribe so you don’t miss out.

Your homework:
Tell others about The 70273 Project.
Subscribe.
Start sketching!

~~~~~~~

UPDATE 2/2/2017:

Good clarification questions, asked and answered:

Q: Is it ok to have cream color in the background?
A: Yes, provided there’s some white and no other colors. Think of the creme/off white as an accent.

Q: Is it ok to have a textured background in cream or white i see that too?
A: Yes.

Q: i see that the middlings are finished with top quilting also
which requires batting. Can we do that too and what thickness of batting?
A: Yes, use batting. Doesn’t matter what kind, though most folks are using the 80/20 mix. You can find a little more about that on the Information for Piecers and Quilters page. Batting can also be a piece of cotton flannel or a piece of muslin.

Q: Also what is the seam allowance for the larger size?
A: Just so long as the finished size is about 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm),  the seam allowance is up to you.

Q: Also i see a heart design out of the x’s which i love. So am i free to make any shape as long as it signifies pairs of x’s On white Or cream?
A: Yes! Isn’t that fun? You can use pairs of red X’s to make shapes, just remember that the red X’s must be stitched in pairs, so be sure to leave space between each pair like Margaret did, and no words, names, or letters. Only the number “70273” can be used.

Q: Can the red x’s just be on whole cloth or do they still need to be pieced?
A: The background of Middlings can be whole cloth or pieced, your preference, it just has to be about 18″ x 22″ (46cm x 56cm) when finished.

Q: How will you catalog these?
A: Each pair of red X’s = one block (so be sure to tell me on the Provenance Form how many pairs are on your Middling) and my database is set up so that one block = one entry. That is, I must enter each block (or in this case paris of red X’s) separately. Here’s how the Middling process will go:

1. You make a middling
2. When finished, you email me this information: the total number of people commemorated; the finished size; when it was completed (month/year); and your name as you want it to appear on the quilt label.
3. I assign a quilt number, design the label and email it back to you.
4. You print and attach the label.
5. You send the Middling to me, with a Provenance Form (even if you’ve already completed one) telling me how many “blocks” (or pairs of red X’s) are on the Middling.
6. I enter each pair as a block (to update the block count and keep my records straight), giving you credit for each one. So you get credit for those “blocks” and for the Middling quilt itself.
Q: Do I need to complete a Provenance Form for each Middling, even if you already have a Provenance Form on file for me because I’ve sent you blocks?
A: Yes. I need a Provenance Form completed, signed, and sent with each Middling. If you send me 3 Middlings, I’ll need a Provenance Form pinned (safety pins, please) to each Middling because I’ve added the space for you to tell me how many blocks, or in this case, pairs of red X’s, are in each Middling. It will help me so much if I don’t have to count every pair of red X’s, so thank you for taking the time to do this.

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Happy Second Birthday To The 70273 Project!

bags and boxes full of mail to be opened

photo description: boxes and bags filled with mail to be opened

Happy birthday to us . . .

Two years ago today, I launched The 70273 Project, ten days after the big, fat, crazy idea came to call and before I had time to think myself out of it. It has changed my life in the most astonishingly wonderful ways:
I have friends – good friends – all over the world.
I am seeing part of the world I never dreamed I’d walk on and breathe in.
I never have to look for something to do.
I could go on, but y’all want to know how many people we have commemorated, so on we go. Here’s what I’ve checked in since last time:

a bag filled with large envelopes of mail

photo description: a bag filled with large envelopes of mail

Happy birthday to us . . . 

BLOCKS
Pat Loveland (US)
Erin Bross (US)
Becca Brackett (US)
Paula Golden (US)
Judy Munford (England)
Anonymous
Suzanne Elswick (US)
Diane Dresdner (US) – She’s made 700 blocks to date and is creating a Middling next!
Maria Conway (Argentina)
Sara Foster (US)
Linda Crews Carter (US)
Sarah Arrington (England)
Amanda Jane Ogden (Durham, U.K.)
Sonja Koons (US)
Lea Ann Ferring (US)
Alamo Heritage Quilt Guild (US)
Members of the Sewing Servants Ministry in Escondido, CA (US)*

a box filled with large envelopes

photo description: a box filled with envelopes

Happy birthday 70273 Project,

QUILTS
Quilt 306, Pieced and Quilted by Diane Lewis
Quilt 307, Pieced and Quilted by Diane Lewis
Quilt 529 (a top) made by Australian Stitchers**
Quilt 530 (a Long, Skinny) made by Lois Sullivan (US)

*Members of the Sewing Servants Ministry:
Ann Drake
Mary Barker
Elias Espinoza
Lupe Cox
Rosa Maria Mendoza
Beatrice Eaton
Linda DeSaverio
Marlene English
Mahbanoo Iradipanah
Beritna Cazarez
R. K. (beautiful handwriting, but I just can’t make out the name)

** Australian Quilters
Musse Harper
Kerry Rochford
Anonymous
Alicia White
Alison McFadden
Lynn King
Rose Cooney
Rebecca Nguyen
Phoebe Adams
Marcia Cameron
Bonnie Niu
Janet Hay
Joanna Stanek
Victoria Cameron
Charis Harper
Cubekal Jasper
Christine Rose B Esmenda

QUILT TOPS
Quilt 409, Pieced by Sandy Panagos
Quilt 410, Pieced by Sandy Pangs
Quilt 392, Pieced by Edna Jamandre
Quilt 393, Pieced by Edna Jamandre

This means I have 4 quilt tops ready to be quilted! If you’re interested, leave a comment, email me, or find me on Facebook or Instagram and let me know.

an envelope, a postcard, a drawstring bag, and a ceramic heart

photo description: an envelope, a postcard, a drawstring bag, and a handmade ceramic heart

a magazine and quilt labels from The International Festival of Quilts

photo description: a magazine and quilt labels from the International Festival of Quilts

Happy birthday, to us.

OTHER GOODIES
~ Pam Arena is at it again – doing something creative and fun. This time she’s started making hearts of clay and leaving them for strangers to find, and she sent me one to leave as a surprise for some attentive passerby.
~ Labels for all the quilts that were in the Special Exhibit at the International Quilt Festival. Last year (or was it the year before?) the Truckee Meadows Quilt Guild in Nevada asked if they could attach one of their quilt show labels on the back of the quilt that hung as part of their show. I thought it was such a good idea, I vowed to make a label for every quilt show every quilt has or will be in. Thank you,  Good People at Quilts, Inc.. You’ve saved me a lot of time!

As of today, we have commemorated 33,491 people, y’all.

And this doesn’t include those commemorated at Durham Cathedral, Rochester Cathedral, or the Jersey Museum. Way back when, I counted some of the blocks and quilts from Durham and Jersey, then I realized it’s easier to count once the quilt are finished and on exhibit, so I have to go back through my records to figure out which ones were counted so I don’t count them twice. I’ll do that next week, so look forward to a new update soon.

Any day now, I’m going to have all the photos from Durham Cathedral, Rochester Cathedral, and Jersey Museum titled and organized so I can share them in blog posts. And I’ll be sharing info about some digital adventures you won’t want to miss, so subscribe to the blog and to The 70273 Project newsletter,.

Thank you for pouring your kind, compassionate, respectful hearts into this project and into the world. I can feel the difference it makes, can you? Happy birthday to us.

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This is What Compassion Looks Like

pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

woman holds a quilt made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

2 women hold a small quilt made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

closeup of a quilt made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

closeup photo of a quilt made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

closeup photo of a quilt made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white and beige background

closeup photo of a quilt made of pairs of red X's stitched to a background of white and beige

closeup photo of a quilt made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

closeup photo of a quilt made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

at Durham Cathedral

hallway lined with quilts

quilts made of pairs of red X's stitched to white backgrounds

wall filled with quilts made of pairs of red X's stitched onto white background fabric

pairs of red X's stitched to a white background fabric

quilts made of pairs of red X's stitched to white background fabric

a small quilt made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

quilts made of pairs of red X's stitched to white background fabric hanging on a wall

a wall filled with quilts made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

a wall filled with quilts made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

quilts made of pairs of red X's stitched to white background fabric

at the Jersey Heritage Museum in the Channel Islands

quilts made of pairs of red X's sewn onto white fabric hanging from the ceiling

small quilts made of pairs of red X's sewn onto a white background fabric

a small quilt made of pairs of red X's sewn onto white fabric

small quilts made of pairs of red X's sewn onto white background fabric

a quilt made of pairs of red X's sewn onto white fabric

huge pairs of red X's stitched to an expanse of white fabric hanging in front of the cathedral in Rochester

quilts hanging from arches in the Rochester Cathedral

a quilt made of pairs of red X's stitched to a white background

a quilt made of pairs of red X's sewn onto a white background

quilts made of pairs of red X's sewn to white background fabric hang in the cathedral

in Rochester Cathedral

There will be many, many more stories and people and photos to come
on the blog and in the newsletter.

Quilt 241

A large quilt with a white background covered with pairs of red X's is shown on the floor in a living room of someone who lives in the U.K.

Photo by Margaret Jackson

Meet The 70273 Project Quilt 241 that will soon hang in Durham Cathedral in observance of Holocaust Memorial Day. Though I can’t tell you the exact dimensions, I think you can tell that she’s a girl of sizable proportions.

395 people are commemorated in Quilt 241, and these are the people who made the blocks:
Julie Lovatt (Coxhoe, Durham, U.K.) (She commemorated 168 people in this amazing quilt!)
Painting for Pleasure Art Group (Trimdon, Durham, U.K.)
Ann Hewitt (Ferryhill, Durham, U.K.)
Emmajayne Saunders (County Durham, U.K.)
Marjorie Collins (County Durham, U.K.)
Mary Robinson (County Durham,U.K.)
Pauline Marr (County Durham, U.K.)
Lesley Snell (Kelloe, Durham, U.K.)
Alex Storey (County Durham, U.K.)
Matthew Storey (County Durham, U.K.)
Marcus Storey (County Durham, U.K.)
Margaret Jackson (Coxhoe, Durham, U.K.)
Valerie Collins (County Durham, U.K.)
C McLean (County Durham,U.K.)
Jenna Wilson (County Durham, U.K.)
Beryl (County Durham, U.K.)

Quilt 241 was Pieced, Quilted, and Finished by Margaret Jackson.

The Engineer and I will be headed across The Pond soon, and I am beyond excited at the prospect of seeing these quilts and meeting the people who made them. I’ll be able to spot the Makers in even the most crowded room because they’ll be the ones wearing bandages on their sore-from-stitching fingertips!

Thank you, Coxhoe Quilters and Neighbors, for your dedication in making sure the 70,273 people are not forgotten and that they did not die in vain as they help us celebrate the perfectly imperfect who live today.

You can read more about The Coxhoe Quilters here and here,

And if you’d like to make a quilt by yourself or with your group (think family, guild, club, school, colleagues, etc.), you can find more about that here. Or if you’re more inclined to make a Middling (fat-quarter sized art quilt), head this way. If a fabric postcard is more to your liking, go right over here and find out more about that. And of course we still accept blocks, if that’s what interests you. However you decide to participate and help us commemorate the 70,273 people who deserved to live, thank you.

Block Count Update: How We Begin the New Year

pairs of red X's sewn to bases of white fabric

Blocks made by Jeff Rich, fellow member of the Orlando Modern Quilt Guild

Between Christmas and New Year’s Day, I checked in blocks from these good folks:

Rachel Williams (US)
Barbara Jensen (US)
Alida Palmisano (US)
Jeff  Rich (US)
Brenda Andrews (US)
Robin Olsen (US)
Elizabeth (Liz)  Sutcliffe (US)
Cindy Ridgedell (US)
Anonymous
Patsi Brletich (US)
Gayle Visher (US)

and quilts from:
Quilt 335 from the Channel Islands (U.K.)  (there will be many more. I’m compiling them now for a series of blog posts.)
Quilt 206 made by Wendy Tuma and others
Quilt 482, made by Patricia Gaska (US)
Quilt 483 made by Susan Bianchi (US)

When we kicked off 2017, we had commemorated 6845 people. Do you want to guess how many commemorations we have as of January 1, 2018? If you said 32,922, give yourself a gold star ’cause you’re exactly right! In case you think your eyes are playing tricks (and because I like saying it), as of January 1, 2018, we have:

32,922 commemorations

or, according to The Engineer, 46.8% of the 70,273 people we will commemorate 

Thank you to all of you who continue to commemorate by making blocks, block quilts, Middlings, and Minis, and to all of you who turn bundles of blocks and quilt tops into finished quilts (if you want a bundle or top, let me know). Please don’t stop stitching and sharing news of The 70273 Project, inviting others to pick up a needle and thread, too. And please keep sending me your stories. They fuel me. They really do.

There are some exciting things right around the bend, so be sure you either subscribe to the blog or check back often. And remember the occasional newsletters called The 70273 Project XXtra.

I hope each one of you know how amazing you are.

Wishing all of you The Best Year Ever in 2018.

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